FAQ Education

FAQ Easy access (teacher faq's)

I want to share (part of) a copyrighted publication with my students. What do I need to do?

Please check if providing a hyperlink to students is a viable alternative for access to the publication. If it is not, you can check if inclusion of the work is allowed because of permissions or licences. For example, some publishers give permission to share accessible articles as PDFs on the digital learning environment (Canvas).

If none of the above is applicable, check how much of the work you need to include. If it is ≤50 pages and at most 25% of the full book or journal – this can be the case with single articles or short book chapters – you are allowed to include the excerpt (‘overname’). If it is more than 50 pages or 25% of the work, permission (and possibly additional compensation) is required.

In either case, please register the materials you wish you use. This way we can monitor the use of copyrighted material at the UT. You can contact Info Point Readers or your information specialist for help.

For a visualized summary, see the flowchart on this webpage.

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Can I provide a copy of an article or book of which I am the (co-)author?

Even though you have created this work, when it gets published you transfer (parts of) the exploitation rights to the publisher. It therefore depends on the agreements with the publisher for what purposes you can use the material, just like with other publications. However, it is often possible to archive pre-prints of your articles in UT Research Information (i.e. green Open Access), and then link to that version in Blackboard or Canvas.

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I want my students to read a book (chapter) that isn’t digitally available…

Students can of course be requested to purchase books to study. Alternatively, the University Library can provide digital access after purchase of the e-book. Should these options be too expensive, for example, but a printed copy of the book is available, students are legally allowed to make a private copy of parts of the book, provided they only use it for their own study.

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Can I upload my PowerPoints/lecture slides?

Copyright of your own educational material, like assignments or lecture slides, typically resides with the University, and you can of course use it for your teaching as you would expect. However, many teachers wish to include visual material that is often copyrighted. While the Dutch citation right and educational exception (comparable to the American Fair use principle) allow for copyrighted visual or audio material to be used during lectures to support your teaching, we recommend selecting freely licensed materials (and referencing correctly) for presentations that will be uploaded.

For more info on finding licensed materials, see Rules for digital educational resources or this website.

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How do I create a link?

In your course on Blackboard or on Canvas, you can share links with your students both in text or as separate content types (e.g. Web Link in Blackboard). Linking to accessible online material is the best and easiest way to provide students with sources. As long as the material in question was not illegally placed online, linking (or alternatively; embedding) ensures there’s no violation of the rules.

In general we can distinguish four types of hyperlinks, ranked here in order of reliability:

1.       https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-6443-2_6
2.       https://ut.on.worldcat.org/oclc/875634755

The first one is a persistent link or permalink made with a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), that is usually available for online scientific sources. The unique DOI can be found in (or at the website of) the publication, and can be added to https://doi.org/ to make the persistent link, like example 1.

Another kind of permalink can be generated by UT systems and databases, like FindUT (example 2). Using these persistent links means you don’t have to check them each year or if the website changes; the link always redirects to the correct source location.

3.       https://goo.gl/vyCH56

Shortlinks (e.g. Google URL or Bit.ly) can also be persistent, are useful to shorten long URLs, and sometimes offer additional benefits like keeping track how often the link is used.

4.       https://typesofengineeringdegrees.org/what-is-biomechanical-engineering/

Lastly we have standard URLs (example 4), as often used when referring to websites. One disadvantage is that they are more susceptible to link rot, like when a website is moved or restructured.

Note: On campus, students and teachers have access to all the library’s sources. To facilitate off-campus access, you can put https://ezproxy2.utwente.nl/login?url=  before the hyperlink. For example: https://ezproxy2.utwente.nl/login?url=https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-6443-2_6

Some additional FAQ can be found on the website of PRO (in Dutch).

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