Ancillary activities

Ancillary activities

FAQ   

1. Are all activities that are not part of a job at the university considered work carried out for third parties?  

Yes, all activities that are not part of a job at the university are considered work carried out for third parties. However, not all work carried out for third parties needs to be reported. 

Work carried out for third parties that does not need to be reported is work that clearly has no relation to the employee's work for the university and that is obviously not detrimental to the interests of the university and 

a. that does not threaten the effective and full performance of the employee's university duties and 
b. that is performed outside working hours, and 
c. for which no payment of any kind is received.   

Such work may include a membership to an amateur sport club board or school board. If you are unsure whether certain work carried out for third parties should be reported, please contact your superior.  

 2. What is understood by a person's ‘position or duties’?  
The tasks and activities that you are expected to perform as an employee are based on the duties assigned to you by the employer. Your classification in the job profile of the University Job Classification System (UFO) is derived from this. Please see your supervisor or the HR-adviser of you faculty or department if you have any questions about your duties or your UFO job profile.  The scheme also applies to specific people who are not employed with the University: e.g. a professor occupying an endowed chair The duties of these persons include agreements made with them regarding specific tasks to be performed.   

3. What is understood by ‘work carried out for third parties’   
a. Is participation in an academic committee or consultative body considered to be work carried out for third parties?  
Not automatically, as these are tasks that fall under your university duties. There can sometimes be ‘grey areas’, however, so in case of doubt it would be advisable to request permission anyway so that the Dean (for academic staff) or Director (for support and administrative staff), possibly supported by HR, can help identify any potential risks with respect to conflicts of interest or academic integrity. If participation is assigned to you, this shall be considered part of your job in any way and not work carried out for third parties. In any event, ensure that activities such as participation in committees or consultative bodies are mentioned on your publicly accessible web page.  
 
b. Is editing work (including as editor-in-chief) and reviewing articles considered to be an ancillary activity?
 Not automatically, as these are tasks that fall under your university duties. There can sometimes be ‘grey areas’, however, so in case of doubt it would be advisable to request permission anyway so that the Dean (for academic staff) or Director (for support and administrative staff) supported by HR, can help identify any potential risks with respect to conflicts of interest or academic integrity. If this work is assigned to you, this shall be considered part of your job in any way and not work carried out for third parties. In any event, ensure that activities such as editing work are mentioned on your publicly accessible web page.  

4. The scope of my work elsewhere exceeds my work at the university, so which activities are considered work carried out for third parties?  
Work you perform elsewhere is considered work carried out for third parties. This means that you will require permission for this work and (if you are a professor) it must be mentioned on your publicly accessible web page. This may seem counter-intuitive since an appointment elsewhere will be your main activity. Permission and disclosure are essential for safeguarding the academic integrity of the university. For these activities, you must comply with the provisions in the scheme and request permission, if applicable, and these ancillary activities must be disclosed. If you are a professor, the kind of you ancillary activities and the organization you work for will be showed automatically on people pages and the overview “Ancillary Activities Professors”. 

5. I will be employed by the university for a maximum of six months; am I still obliged to report my work carried out for third parties?  No. In order to avoid unnecessarily burdening parties engaged for such a short period, work carried out for third parties does not need to be reported in principle (unless the university has specified otherwise) except where the activities involved: 

a. pose a risk to the academic, organisational and/or business interests of the university or; 

b. form an obstacle to the effective and the complete performance of the employee in question's duties at the university or; 
c. are detrimental to the reputation of the institution or; 
d. can result in a conflict of interests with the university.   

You yourself are responsible for making this decision. If in doubt, you are advised to contact your supervisor or university contact person.   

6. I receive no earnings for my work carried out for third parties. Am I still obliged to report such work?   
No earnings do not automatically mean no obligation to report the work carried out for third parties. There are considerations besides money that may adversely affect the academic or other interests of the university or the proper performance of your job (e.g. excessive demands on your time).   

For example, the incorporation of a legal person or being engaged as an administrator, supervisor or shareholder of another organization may also warrant reporting to the university as such an engagement may involve a deferred remuneration or a possible conflict of interests.   

7. How do I request permission for work carried out for third parties or changes to this work?  You request permission and report work carried out for third parties by using the Web Application Ancillary Activities. This application can by found in the employee portal underneath My apps/My appointment. 

The procedure is as follows: You discuss with your supervisor the work for third parties that you are going to perform or the changes to (aspects of) the work for third parties that you are already performing. You must have this discussion before you commence the work or the changes occur. You then report your work carried out for third parties via the Webapplication Ancillary Activities.  Your supervisor advises on you report. The mandatary will either grant or refuse permission for the work carried out for third parties that you have reported or the mandatory will grant conditional permission. This decision will be confirmed to you in letter, sent by e-mail. The letter will be included in your personnel file. Objections to this decision may be submitted in the usual manner.   

8. How does the approval procedure start for new staff members?  During the last stage of the selection procedure (when parties also endeavor to reach agreement on the employment conditions), managers are expected to investigate whether the candidate performs any potentially problematic work for third parties. Making the new staff member aware that the ancillary activities have to be reported via the Webapplication at the start of their employment is part of the intake or the employment conditions interview  

9. I do lots of small jobs, surely it's impossible to ask for permission every single time?  In the interest of safeguarding the university's academic integrity, it is essential that you be as transparent as possible when reporting any work carried out for third parties. For this reason, it is essential that you seek permission for all work carried out for third parties, including minor jobs. Try to report such work as far in advance as possible and always keep your publicly accessible web page up to date.  If it is not possible to seek permission in advance owing to special circumstances beyond your control, it is essential that you report the work as soon as you can. If your request is rejected, you must cease the work for third parties.   

10. Are positions in public administration permitted by the employer as work carried out for third parties?  The university will always grant permission for the performance of elected positions in public administration, such as on the municipal council for example. Taking up such positions is your democratic right. Nevertheless, these positions must be reported.   

11. I perform work for third parties for which I receive earnings; do I need to report this to the university?  
Yes, if you receive remuneration for your work for third parties, this work must be reported to the university. (Article 14 of the scheme.) Additional earnings are also understood to mean deferred earnings (Article 3), such as shares and other financial interests. The primary objective of the duty to report is to identify possible conflicts of interest; it is not the case that reported additional earnings automatically benefit the university.   Earnings, including additional earnings, can be divided into three categories. Depending on the category, earnings may accrue to the employer, to you or be divided:   

a. Earnings that are not related to your position at the university accrue to you. 
b. Earnings that are directly related to your position at the university, and for which work is performed during working hours,
    accrue to the university. 
c. Earnings that indirectly arise from your position at the university may be fully or partially added to the budget of the
    department or accrue to the employee in question following consultation with the employee in question,
    at the employer's discretion. This shall be specified further in the conditions for granting permission to
    perform work for third parties.  Agreements about which earnings and how much earnings will be added
    to the budget of the department or accrue to you and in what way this happens will be made in writing
    and included in your personnel file.