agenda_onderwerpen

4. Sustainable Energy Technology nota




C o n c e p t (JBE)







Master Sustainable Energy Technology




Information in support of the application for accreditation by NVAO
































3TU Graduate School

(TU/e, TUD, UT)


October 20, 2005




1 INTRODUCTION 4

2 FINAL ATTAINMENT LEVEL (PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES) IN THE MASTER PROGRAMME 8

2.1 Domain-specific requirements 8

2.2 General and scientific requirements 9

2.3 Research oriented 10

2.4 Pedagogical approach 10

3 MASTER’S PROGRAMME 11

3.1 Overview of the Master’s programme 11

3.2 Master’s programme cohesion 15

3.3 Relation between the Master’s programme and academic research 17

3.4 Relation between final attainment level and the Master’s programme 18

3.5 Master’s programme study load 22

3.6 Academic support facilities 22

3.7 Admission 22

3.8 Duration 23

4 HUMAN RESOURCES EFFORTS 24

4.1 WO requirements 28

4.2 Staff quantity 28

4.3 Staff quality 28

5 FACILITIES 29

5.1 General services 29

5.2 Library facilities and other learning resources 29

5.3 ICT facilities 30

5.4 Video conferencing room 30

5.5 Academic support facilities 30

5.6 Office facilities 31

6 METHODS OF ASSESSMENT AND SYSTEM OF QUALITY CONTROL 32

6.1 Methods of assessment 32

6.2 System of quality control 33

6.3 Student involvement in quality control 37

7 CONTINUITY CONDITIONS 38

7.1 Guaranteed completion 38

7.2 Financial Analysis 38

7.3 Investments 39

Appendices

Appendix A: Summary of report (in Dutch): De TU/e M.Sc. Sustainable Energy – een verkenning van de markt, SDE, juli 2002

Appendix B: (In Dutch) Slagkracht in innovatie: Sectorplan Wetenschap en Technologie, februari 2004

Appendix C: Academic Criteria for Bachelor and Master Curricula, 3 TU, January 2005.

Appendix D: Description of courses: core curriculum

Appendix E: Elective subjects: M.Sc. Sustainable Energy Technology

Appendix F: Graduation projects

Appendix G: Short CV’s of Teaching Staff



1Introduction

Need for the M.Sc. programme Sustainable Energy Technology


In June 2005 the TU/e obtained the accreditation from NVAO for a M.Sc programme Sustainable Energy Technology. Already at that moment it has been the intention of TU/e and the two other technical universities TUDelft and UT, cooperating in the 3TU Graduate School to extend this M.Sc. programme to a national programme. This document is an extension of the document from TU/e, with contributions from TUDelft and UT, in support of the application of the accreditation by NVAO of this national M.Sc programme.

The actual need for engineers in sustainable energy technologies has been identified in a study performed by the director of SDE (Stichting Samenwerkingsverband Duurzame Energie) (see appendix A). Interviews were done with 18 organizations from the energy sector (i.e. EPZ, Essent and Nuon) and sectors closely related to it, such as the supplying industry, research institutes (i.e. universities, TNO and ECN), engineering offices, consultancy firms (i.e. Ecofys, CE and CEA) and parties involved in energy policy (i.e. ministries and NGO’s). The study clearly shows the need for graduate students with knowledge and skills of both sustainable energy technologies and knowledge of the introduction of these technologies in society. Hence, the future engineers need a sound technological basis of classical energy conversion systems, the physics and chemistry behind renewable energy systems based on biomass, wind and solar energy and hydrogen as possible future energy carrier and of how sustainable systems need to interact in a stable electrical grid. Current developments in the energy sector make that future engineers require more than a purely technical knowledge. The liberalization and internationalization of energy markets require understanding of (institutional) economy and their part in changes in the energy sector. During the transition to a sustainable energy supply both technical and social consequences (i.e. policy questions and legal aspects) have to be considered. The combination of engineering (beta) and policy (gamma) topics related to sustainable energy technology in one educational programme is unique and only possible in cooperation between different departments.

The need for graduate students in sustainable energy technologies also follows from the commitment of The Netherlands and many other countries to the Kyoto protocol on the reduction of greenhouse gases. For The Netherlands this resulted in a further commitment to generate 10% of the total energy use by renewable energy sources by the year 2010 (i.e. solar, wind and biomass). To reach these goals the use and generation of energy should be as efficient and clean as possible and renewable energy sources should be used as much as possible. Subsequently, the fossil fuels (i.e. oil, gas and coal) and renewable energy sources should be used as best as possible to avoid inefficient energy conversion. Only by considering the system as a whole and combining it with a thorough (multidisciplinary) knowledge about the processes within, different options can be evaluated and checked for their practical feasibility. Since September 11th 2001, the concept of sustainability also has an extra meaning in the short term. There is a new social need for the design of energy supply chains with little vulnerability. This issue is especially important for large connected grids for gas and electricity.

The Dutch Government has recently started to increase the innovative power of the Dutch society. The proposed programme will contribute to the advancement of the Dutch knowledge economy (kenniseconomie) as its graduates and researchers will contribute to new scientific developments in the area of sustainable energy technology in innovative sectors of industry.







M.Sc. Sustainable Energy Technology and the 3 TU Graduate School

In 2003 the three universities of technology in The Netherlands (Technische Universiteit Delft, Universiteit Twente and Technische Universiteit Eindhoven) embarked in a cooperation directed at the harmonization and coordination of research and educational efforts. In March 2004 the final version of the resulting joint strategy report “ Sectorplan Wetenschap en Technologie” was presented to the Staatssecretaris van Onderwijs Cultuur en Wetenschappen (appendix B). Five new M.Sc.-programmes are proposed in this plan because these programmes are not yet offered in The Netherlands and are considered as being essential for (innovation of) the Dutch knowledge-based economy (kenniseconomie). The M.Sc. programme Sustainable Energy Technology is one of these five.

The three technical universities TU/e, TUDelft, and UT are in a good position to offer a national M.Sc. programme as required by the energy sector.

The energy-related research at the three locations is accommodated in different research schools.

Examples of research areas are:

Research on energy from biomass at all three locations with different specialities. The UT has an emphasis on thermal and chemical conversion processes for the use of biomass as an energy carrier and chemicals. At the TU/e the biomass related research is focused on small scale conversion units with a special emphasis on the tar removal and cleaning of the syn gas. At the TUDelft biomass related research is focused on large scale power generation.

Research on solar energy focused in Eindhoven on the production of amorphous silicon and polymer solar cells, in Delft on nano-structured 3D solar cells and in Twente on the integration of solar energy into products.

Research on wind energy is mainly concentrated in Delft with some small contributions from TU/e in the area of fluid structure interaction and from UT in computational fluid dynamics of wind turbines

Research on hydrogen technology with its focus on the large scale production of hydrogen in Twente, the production using sustainable energy and storage of hydrogen in Delft and the small scale production of hydrogen in Eindhoven.

Characteristic for these research topics is that several departments cooperate in these areas. Only through this cooperation between different departments a good combination of broad and in-depth research can be accomplished. The connection between education and research in this field of technology guarantees a strong basis for the M.Sc. programme.


It is of great importance that a master programme is firmly and directly linked to the research groups. Through the direct participation of the heads of these groups in Sustainable Energy Technology (SET), the corresponding master programme will be firmly embedded in the participating departments. In order to take advantage of the available synergy - the master programme is defined as a multidisciplinary and interdepartmental programme, independent from existing M.Sc.-programmes at each of the participating departments.



Benchmark for the M.Sc. programme Sustainable Energy Technology

At the moment, a strong interdisciplinary technological study programme like this is unique in The Netherlands. The Utrecht University offers a track Energy and Resources within the Sustainable Development Master’s programme. The report of SDE describes the difference between the original TU/e programme and the programme in Utrecht as follows: “The M.Sc.-programme Energy and Resources, as is offered by the Universiteit Utrecht has an approach which focuses more on the stages in the energy chain and more on the policy dimensions of the supply of energy. This as opposed to the programme in Eindhoven, which follows an interdisciplinary technological approach. It is found that the interviewees (the 18 organizations from the energy sector) will be able to make a conscious choice between the Eindhoven Master Sustainable Energy (Technology) and the Utrecht Master Energy and Resources.”

Because of the need expressed in the SDE research for graduate students with knowledge of sustainable energy technologies and knowledge of the introduction of these technologies in society, this national programme will integrate technical and social sciences. The ratio between these sciences will be inverse to the ratio in Utrecht, while in Utrecht the ratio between technological and social sciences is about 25 to 75, the ratio in this 3TU programme will be 75 to 25. This way both programmes will complement each other.

Also internationally the energy courses at an M.Sc.-level can be divided into two groups: 1) more technically oriented and 2) more policy oriented. An example of a course in the second category, which can be compared to the course offered in Utrecht is: Sustainable Energy Systems at the University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

Courses in the first category, are:

-Renewable Energy at the Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Germany

-Sustainable Energy Engineering at the Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden

-Sustainable Energy Engineering at the University of Leeds, United Kingdom.

The course at the Royal Institute of Technology focuses rather on the application of technologies in the generation and utilization of energy. The course does not cover all relevant areas for sustainable energy. The 3TU programme will be more focused on research and will cover more fundamental principles in order to meet the criterion that its engineers should be broadly deployable. The course at the University of Leeds is directed at practical industrial combustion and emission problems of energy supply, including transport emission problems and the related environmental pollution consequences of polluted water and air. This course has clearly a rather limited scope with relatively one-sided attention for sustainable energy.

The programme at the University of Oldenburg has the following core courses: Solar Energy; Wind & Hydro Energy; Energy from Biomass; Energy Meteorology; Energy Systems & Power Plants and Economy of Energy Systems. Some of the main requirements to fulfil the needs identified above can be recognized in this programme, notably the interdisciplinary approach, the attention for technical and social sciences and the system approach. This programme will be seen as the benchmark for the 3TU programme. The ambition of the 3TU graduate school is, however, to offer a more research-oriented programme oriented at research-based technological design in order to fulfil the societal need for engineers that can contribute to the innovativeness of The Netherlands and the advancement of the Dutch knowledge economy.



Organizational structure of the programme


The interdepartmental master programme Sustainable Energy Technology will be accommodated in Eindhoven by the department of Mechanical Engineering in Twente by the faculty of Engineering Technology and in Delft by the faculty of Applied Sciences.

All supporting services will be provided by staff of these departments.


In the transfer to a national programme it will be the 3TU Graduate School to act as a commissioner.

At present it is not (yet) possible to have one CROHO-position for the programme. So there will be three curriculum committees (one at each location), with three programme directors, being the programme directors of the accommodating departments.

Anticipating the new WHW we suggest that the programme supervision of the M.Sc. programme will be in the hands of a small committee with one member from each of the three locations. This committee consists of dr. ir. A.M.C. Lemmens (TU/e), prof.dr.ir. Th.H, van der Meer (UT) and prof.dr. J. Schoonman (TUDelft). The programme director is dr.ir. A.M.C. Lemmens.

Another suggestion is the formation of one Examination Board. Because of practical issues this board will authorize the three local Boards.


It is very important that the Master Programme Sustainable Energy Technology (SET) is also well embedded in all the participating departments. Within SET, therefore, a number of theme-groups are distinguished: Solar Energy, Wind-energy, Biomass, Hydrogen, Intelligent electricity networks, and Transition policy. All lecturers of the different departments at TU/e, TUD and UT are members of one of these theme groups.

The theme-groups are represented in the Curriculum Committee (Onderwijs Commissie).

The research activities related to the Master Programme match perfectly with the research of the Dutch Graduate School on Process Technology (OSPT, in which the Departments of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering take part), J.M. Burgers Centre (in which the departments of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Physics take part) and of the Centre for Plasma Physics and Radiation Technology (CPS, in which the departments of Applied Physics and Electrical Engineering take part), and the Delft Institute for Sustainable Energy (DISE). The activities in the department of Technology Management will be accommodated in the Posthumus Institute and the J.F.Schouten School.

The programme also coincides with the former activities of the Dutch Foundation for Sustainable Energy (SDE). Participants of this foundation were ECN (Energy Centre The Netherlands), TNO (the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research), universities and a number of industrial partners: EDON, ENECO, Energie Delfland, ENW, EnergieNed, EPON, GASTEC, KEMA, Shell and Stork. In cooperation with SDE the subjects of the system integration projects (see appendix A) were formulated in the past years. This cooperation has been continued with some the industrial partners in varying bilateral arrangements. With these partners possibilities are investigated to incorporate in company research trainings for some of the students.

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2Final attainment level (programme objectives) in the Master programme

In this section we describe the skills and knowledge of a graduate in Sustainable Energy Technology and indicate his or her general academic level.

2.1Domain-specific requirements

The domain specific requirements are based on the needs of the energy sector and of countries as already expressed in the introduction. Organizations from the energy sector, sectors closely related to it and parties involved in energy policy indicate the need for graduate students with knowledge of sustainable energy technologies and, as well as, knowledge of the introduction of these technologies in society. Worldwide the energy from biomass and solar energy are seen as the most promising sustainable sources. Other promising sustainable energy sources differ from region to region. For the Netherlands, similar to several other countries, wind energy is definitely an important option. Hydrogen technologies are most promising in being carriers for sustainable energy in the future. In the transition from an energy system based on fossil fuels to a system based on sustainable sources, sustainable energy technologies have to be incorporated in conventional systems. Knowledge of existing energy conversion and electrical power engineering is therefore essential. Introduction of sustainable energy technologies in society and current developments in the energy sector make that future engineers require more than a profound technical knowledge. The liberalization and internationalization of energy markets require understanding of (institutional) economy. Therefore, future graduate students are expected to have knowledge of theoretical concepts and models that provide understanding in these kinds of innovation processes. Energy distribution companies have experienced that the introduction of ‘green energy’ or sustainable technologies in society require taking into account the consumers and their perception of green energy. This requires knowledge on consumer behaviour and psychology in order to achieve societal acceptance.

To evaluate the different energy options in their technological and social context and to test their practical feasibility, a system approach is needed combined with a fundamental understanding of the processes within these systems. This combination of skills and knowledge will enable the Master of Science in Sustainable Energy Technology to work on the energy supply of the future.


These requirements have been translated in specific exit qualifications in which also the academic level of the programme is indicated. The Master of Science in Sustainable Energy Technology:

has the necessary disciplinary theoretical and technical knowledge to evaluate a broad range (e.g. biomass, solar energy, wind energy, hydrogen as an energy carrier) of existing and newly designed sustainable energy systems.

is able to evaluate conventional and sustainable energy systems in an integrated electrical system context.

Is able to evaluate conventional and sustainable energy systems is a heat and power context

is able to design energy systems integrated in the built environment and is able to evaluate such designs.

is able to “design” sustainability, in particular optimizing the use of energy (“from the cradle to the grave”)

is able to evaluate existing and newly designed sustainable energy systems in the societal context taking into account both economic and consumer oriented issues.

is able to analyze and understand the socio- technical nature of system innovations and the opportunities and barriers for the development of sustainable energy technologies.

is an expert in at least one sub-area of Sustainable Energy Technology (e.g. biomass, solar energy, wind energy, hydrogen as an energy carrier, intelligent electrical networks, transitions and niche management).

is able to form an opinion and contribute to discussions about complex technological matters related to sustainable energy taking also into account the complexity of related social, economic and ethical issues and take responsibility for these judgments.


2.2General and scientific requirements

The Master of Sustainable Energy Technology has both a scientific and an engineering orientation at an academic level.

The 3 technical universities have recently published an extensive set of academic criteria for bachelor and master curricula, based on the Dublin Descriptors (appendix C). The general and scientific requirements below are based on these criteria.

Regarding academic design the graduate has the following qualifications:

- Has a thorough scientific attitude (having the ability to work independently, to reflect, to critically analyze, to generate novel ideas, etc.).

Is able to maintain and expand his expertise in the field (for instance, by consulting relevant literature).

In his scientific attitude he does not restrict himself to the boundaries of the Sustainable Energy Technology domain, and is capable to cross these, where and when necessary.

Has the ability to reflect on the complete scope of Sustainable Energy Technology issues.

As an academic, the graduate understands the potential benefits of research and is able to understand and incorporate the results of research into his own work. He/she has the potential to contribute to or perform research himself.

Knows the importance of oral and written communication, in particular in English, and can make effective use of these. He also adheres to existing academic traditions, like giving proper credits and references.

Has the habit to reflect upon own work and continuously uses relevant information to improve his capabilities.

Is able to operate in the context of a team and can act as a project leader.

Is skilled in properly documenting and presenting results.

Is able to communicate the results of scientific and design work including the underlying knowledge, choices and considerations to colleagues and to a broader public.


As a professional engineer he/she has the following capabilities in addition to the capabilities listed above:


The engineer knows that compromises are unavoidable and can effectively deal with these.

The engineer makes decisions based on calculated risk.

The engineer knows that models only approximate reality, but can develop and use them adequately, whenever this is beneficial.

The engineer knows the disadvantages of certain design decisions and can communicate these with the relevant parties (stakeholders). He can take the purpose of the design and its context into consideration.

The engineer has the attitude and is able to implement the concept of life-long-learning both in and outside the field of expertise build-up in the M.Sc. programme.

- Has acquired the necessary engineering skills (is able to work systematically and methodically, is able to invent his own tools, theories and techniques if these are not available, is able to work in a multidisciplinary environment, be application oriented, etc.).


2.3Research oriented

The Master’s of Science in Sustainable Energy Technology is a scientific and engineering Master in higher education). It is a research driven programme with strong links between the educational programme and research done at the various collaborating departments. In paragraph 3.2 a more detailed look at the relation between the programme and the academic research will be presented.


2.4Pedagogical approach

To date, business and industry require an increasing number of employees who know how to handle the ever growing knowledge and information data bases. Staff members are expected to be independent (team players?), self-directing, and willing to be involved in long-life learning. The key competence for a modern student is to be able to navigate in a vast sea of information. This requires not only a shift in emphasis from teacher-guided knowledge transfer to student guided knowledge construction, but asks for new capabilities and attitudes. The universities are familiar with educational forms such as lectures, lab. Courses, programme-centred education with or without ICT support. These forms are more or less teacher dependent.

However, a cognitivist approach of the learning process asks for more student-oriented education and is characterized by forms like: writing of papers, literature reviews, making of computer simulations and research assignments. In the past years more and more student-oriented didactical models have been introduced in the programmes of the three technical universities, such as project-led or problem oriented education

Construction of knowledge also asks for abilities. Therefore it is necessary to interconnect the process of information assimilation to the process of cognition and learning behaviour. It is necessary to create formats in which students learn how to learn. The educational programme is more and more directed towards competences. During the programmes students are mastering academic skills amongst which the most important for our research driven M.Sc. programme is doing research.


In this M.Sc. programme a balance is sought between lectures and lab. courses on the one side and project-led or problem oriented education and research assignments on the other. All core lectures will have a laboratory part to develop the empirical or modelling abilities of the students. Part of the lectures will be based on reviews of research papers to be made and presented by the students themselves. In the lectures teachers will be able to place their subject and the related research in the larger context, to motivate the students, to efficiently transfer the basic knowledge necessary for effectively start the own construction of knowledge, and to give guidelines for the construction process. In the laboratory parts students will start their own process of construction of knowledge. The first integration project is problem oriented and modelled conform the idea of Design Based Learning (DBL). The key to DBL is working on realistic problems (case studies) in project groups. These case studies stimulate a whole range of joint and individual study activities. In project groups, students analyze problems, formulate sub-tasks, and report their findings from literature studies and other educational tools. The educational approach demands a great deal of individual initiative. In the second project students will gain more individual hands-on experience in the design, analysis or application of an energy system or in the exploration of new research questions. The second project is also problem oriented but has the form of a research assignment.

Competence learning is thus interwoven in all parts of the curriculum. Consecutive course tracks are followed where each part of the programme builds upon the earlier ones, thus contributing to the students’ competences.

The link between each part of the programme and the goals of the programme, including the competences to be developed, is presented in paragraph 3.3 below.



3Master’s programme

3.1Overview of the Master’s programme

The Master’s programme is subdivided in two years. During the first year, students acquire knowledge by taking courses. In most cases these courses include a practical part in which the acquired knowledge is applied. The courses in the first semester deal with the homologation of knowledge of students with different backgrounds and provide an introduction in system thinking, while the courses in the second and third semester are more concerned with in-depth knowledge. In addition, students will be taught to apply the knowledge in projects, which are partly organized by the industry. In these projects both the system approach and the beta– and gamma- approach come back. In the first group project interdisciplinary cooperation is one of the major goals. The second project should prepare on the implementation of research and is, therefore, done individually. The second year of the programme is concentrated on research and/or design. Elective courses make it possible to acquire further in-depth knowledge that is necessary to effectively carry out the research or design project. Students can choose their M Sc.-project in one of the six theme areas: Solar Energy, Wind energy, Biomass, Hydrogen, Intelligent electricity networks and Transition policy.


The detailed structure of the programme is given in the tables below for the three different locations:


N.B. Although the three universities are working with the semester-system, the duration of the different periods within a semester differ. It is the intention that, in the near future convergence will take place.


Table 1a: Detailed structure of the SET master programme in Eindhoven

Course Schedule

Year 1


Course name

ECTS


Semester 1



Technology for sustainable development*

3


Renewable energy sources*

3


Physical transport phenomena*

3


Energy conversion*

3


Electrical power engineering and system integration*

4


Design methodology*

3


Chemistry introduction

1


Energy from biomass

4


System integration project I (group)

6


Semester 2



Solar energy

4


Energy and consumer

3


Energy and economy

3


Hydrogen technology

4


Wind energy

4


System innovation and strategic niche management

3


System integration project II (individual)

9




Year 2


Elective courses

15


Graduation project

45

* Depending on the knowledge acquired in the B.Sc.-programme these courses may be replaced by elective courses.

A detailed description of these courses is given in Appendix D


Table 1b: Detailed structure of the SET master program in Twente

Course Schedule

Year 1


Course name

ECTS


Semester 1



Technology and sustainable development

4

Transport phenomena*

3


Design methodology*

5


Energy systems*

3


Reactor Technology*

2


Energy from biomass

4


System integration project I (group)

6


Electrical power engineering and system integration*

4


Semester 2



Solar energy

4


Hydrogen technology, with contributions of prof. Kuipers

4


Institutional economics of energy

4


System integration project II (individual)

2


Wind energy, with contributions of prof. Hoeijmakers

4


System innovation and strategic niche management

4


System integration project II (individual)

7




Year 2


Elective courses

15


Graduation project

45

* 1. Depending on the knowledge acquired in the B.Sc.-program these courses may be replaced by elective courses.

2. Depending on the amount of projects in the BsC program, the system integration projects may be replaced by an internship.

A detailed description of these courses is given in Appendix D.


Table 1c: Detailed structure of the SET master programme in Delft

Course Schedule

Year 1


Course name

ECTS


Semester 1



Technology and sustainable development

3

Renewable Energy Sources

3


Advanced Flow and Transport Phenomena, Van den Akker

4


Electrical Power Engineering; Van der Sluis

5


Design Methodology: via IO

4


Energy from biomass, Van Ommen, De Jong

4


Solar Energy, Siebbeles, Zeman

4


Energy and Consumer

3


Energy and economy

3


System integration project I (group)

6


Semester 2



Sustainable hydrogen and electrical energy storage, Schoonman, Kelder

4


Fuel cell systems, Wouldstra

2


Wind energy, Van Bussel

3


System innovation and strategic niche management

3


System integration project II (group)

9

Year 2


Elective courses

15


Graduation project

45

* Depending on the knowledge acquired in the B.Sc.-programme these courses may be replaced by elective courses.

A detailed description of these courses is given in Appendix D.


Elective courses are chosen by the student in consultation with the supervisor for the graduation project and have to be approved by the Examination Board. The Examination Board provides a list of approved courses that are considered to have the required academic level. This list is presented in Appendix E. Other courses are possible as well; these courses need approval in advance from the Examination Board. More information on the graduation projects is presented in appendix F.


For the six courses connected to these theme areas, representing in total 19 ECTS the three universities have decided to use the same course material. Only slight differences are representing some local flavor at the different locations. Also the System Integration Projects I and II (15 ECTS) will be similar. This means that 34 ECTS of the first year are common. The programme of the second year at the three locations is identical as well.



3.2Master’s programme cohesion

The programme cohesion is provided by a structure of different blocks of courses, in which each block performs its own specific function as described below. Indicated is also de relation between the blocks and the way in which each block fits in the programme.


introductory courses:

‘Technology for sustainable development’ and ‘Renewable energy sources’ (TU/e)

Technology and sustainable development (UT)

These courses introduce the students into the programme and give a bird's eye view on the courses which will follow in the M.Sc.-programme.

courses to reach adequate basic levels in mathematics and physics:

‘Physical transport phenomena’ and ‘Energy conversion’ (TU/e)

‘Transport phenomena’, ‘Energy systems’ and ‘Reactor Technology’(UT)

The levels in mathematics and physics of the students from the different B.Sc.-programmes who may enter the programme can differ a lot. These courses will bring all students at the mathematical/physics level to follow the core courses. Students who already meet the requirements upon entrance will be able to follow extra elective courses.

courses to reach adequate basic levels in social sciences:

‘Energy and economy’ (TUD) ‘Energy and consumer’ (TU/e)

‘Institutional economics of energy’ (UT)

provide the necessary disciplinary knowledge in economic and psychology for the system integration course on the introduction of sustainable energy technologies into society.

core courses:

‘Energy from biomass’, ‘Solar energy’, ‘Hydrogen technology’ and ‘Wind energy’ provide the disciplinary knowledge in the different sustainable energy technology areas. Technologies in the area of energy from biomass, the sun and the wind are considered as the basic pillars for an energy system based on sustainable resources. Solar and wind energy require electrical energy storage in rechargeable batteries.

The labs included in each of the courses provide some basic experimental skills which will be used in the second integration project and the M.Sc.-research project.


system integration courses:

‘Electrical power engineering and system integration’, ‘Design methodology’ and ‘System innovation and strategic niche management’ form the basis of the integration of sustainable energy technologies in, respectively, the electrical power system, the (system of the) build environment and the society (societal system). Also in these courses labs are included to provide or improve basic experimental and research skills.


system integration projects:

‘System integration projects 1 and 2’. In these projects the knowledge and skills acquired in the courses are integrated and brought into practice. In the first project in-depth technological knowledge and knowledge on system integration are used to solve real life cases through a thorough multidisciplinary approach. The second project concentrates more on in-depth research into a specific area but placed within the broad context of system integration. As such this project is a preparation on the final year M.Sc.-project.

elective courses:

Elective courses give the students the possibility to acquire the necessary in-depth knowledge to effectively implement a graduation project in one of the theme groups.

graduation project:

During the graduation phase a student uses his competences (knowledge/skills and attitude), acquired during the programme with a view on the graduation project at hand, to carry out a research or design project of a scientific nature.



3.3Relation between the Master’s programme and academic research

The Master’s programme Sustainable Energy Technology is a research driven programme. AT all three locations research in this field is at a high level and of high importance. In the recent research plans of the 3TU Institute of Science and Technology the research area “Technologies for sustainable energy” is chosen as one of the five area’s for the formation of a Centre of Excellence. This will increase the importance of this research area and its visibility for potential students. The research groups that will be involved in this Centre of Excellence also contribute to this Master’s programme.

The interaction between parts of the programme and research can be found on three levels:

1.Research is used as example in the course;

2.Papers reflecting the research are part of the course material;

3.Research and/or design tasks in the course are based on the academic research of the group whereby the level of supervision decreases during the programme.


Based on this definition the relation between the different parts of the M.Sc. programme and research is listed in the table below.

Table 2: Relation between course parts and research

Course name

Research as example

Research papers as course material

Research/design task related to academic research

x = under supervision

0 = autonomous

Technology for sustainable development (TU/e)

Technology and sustainable development (UT)

Technology and sustainable development (TUD)

x


x



x



x

Renewable Energy Sources (TU/e)

Renewable Energy Sources (TUD)

x

x


x


x

Physical transport phenomena (TU/e)

Transport phenomena (UT)

Advanced Flow and Transport Phenomena (TUD)

x


x



Reactor Technology (UT)

x



Energy conversion (TU/e)

Energy systems (UT)

x


x



Electrical power engineering and system integration

Electrical Power Engineering (TUD)

x


x


X


x

Design methodology

x



Energy from biomass

Energy from biomass (TUD)

x

x

X

x

X

x

Solar energy

Solar Energy (TUD)

x

x

X

x

X

x

Energy and consumer (TU/e)

x

x


Energy and economy (TU/e)

Institutional economics of energy (UT)

x



System integration project I (group)



x

Hydrogen technology (TU/e/UT)

Sustainable hydrogen and electrical energy storage (TUD)

Fuel cell systems (TUD)

x


x

x

X


x

X


X

x

Wind energy (TUD)

x

x

x

System innovation and strategic niche management

x

x

x

System integration project II (individual)



0









Elective courses

x

x

x

Graduation project



0


In the description of the courses in appendix E details can be found on the topical scientific theories that are explicitly discussed, the actual research projects on which examples and cases are based and the scientific skills which are dealt with.



3.4Relation between final attainment level and the Master’s programme

Table 3 below gives an overview of the relation between the final attainment level (programme objectives) regarding domain specific requirements and the different parts of the programme. Table 4 gives an overview of the relation between the general and scientific requirements and parts of the programme. The column titles in tables 3 and 4 refer to the programme objectives listed in sections 2.1. and 2.2 respectively. In the tables only objectives to which special attention is being paid are ticked. This does not mean that in the other courses these objectives are not dealt with. For instance: in each course attention is given to the necessary scientific attitude.


The introductory courses give an introduction into the areas of sustainability and renewable energy. These courses reflect on the broad scope of the SET-domain and place this domain in its broader context. They give the students the opportunity to orient themselves on the programme, give an indication of the contribution of each of the subsequent courses to the programme and build up the motivation to follow the different parts of the programme. Students are given insight into the possible contribution of fundamental and applied science and the resulting technologies on the transition of a society with an energy system based on fossil fuels towards a society with an energy system based on sustainable energy sources. It is also shown that compromises on the way towards sustainability are unavoidable. Technology designs will solve problems but can create others at the same time. The future cannot be moulded nor is it predictable. Decisions, therefore, will always be based on risks. The task of researchers and engineers is to reduce these risks as much as possible.

The courses “Physical transport phenomena/Transport phenomena/Advanced flow and transport phenomena” and “Energy conversion/Energy systems” are basic courses, which provide the students, having a different B.Sc. level, with the required academic mathematics and physics level, in particular with a focus on transport phenomena and thermodynamics. The latter course emphasizes in particular the present energy economy, which is mainly based on fossil fuels. In the transition to sustainable energy sources, the route is “fossil fuels-clean fossil fuels-most probably also nuclear energy-and sustainable

energy”. This means that carbon dioxide capture and sequestration needs attention in the course. In addition, efficient utilization of fossil and clean fossil fuels is an important theme.


The fundamental basics of sustainable energy technologies are presented in the courses “Energy from biomass, Solar energy, Hydrogen technology, Sustainable hydrogen and electrical energy storage, and wind energy” and provide the students with the right expertise and the research and engineering skills, to be expected from SET engineers. An academic attitude, obtained by developing a curiosity-oriented and open mind for experimental and theoretical reasoning, requires high-level academic teachers with a research-oriented attitude. Here, the education in the second year of the Master curriculum requires to confront the students with developments at the frontiers of fundamental scientific and technological research developments. While the courses will focus on specific skills, the aim is also to create a scientific attitude towards understanding a broad spectrum of problem-solving techniques and analyses of research results. In addition to theoretical aspects, part of the courses will be focused on experimental aspects in order for the students to practice their acquired knowledge.


The courses “Electrical power engineering and system integration, Electrical power engineering, Design methodology, and System innovation and strategic niche management” provide the basis for the integration of sustainable energy technologies in, respectively, the electrical power system, the (system of the) built environment and the society (societal system). Also in these courses the academically trained and research-oriented teachers pay ample attention to the necessary academic attitudes.


The courses ‘Energy and economy/Institutional economics of energy’, and ‘Energy and consumer’ provide the necessary disciplinary knowledge in the social sciences for the introduction and societal acceptance of sustainable energy technologies.

This orientation of the course on social sciences gives an important contribution to the broadening of the scope of SET engineers necessary to evaluate and analyze energy systems in the societal context.


In virtually all courses attention is given to proper academic referencing and documenting. In many of the courses attention is paid to opinion forming, presentation and communication. But in the ‘System integration projects 1 and 2’ the main focus is on these skills. In both projects students will bring into practice theory from the other courses. They will work on a multidisciplinary real life problem, which is an issue on the level of system integration in the field of (sustainable) energy technology. The projects are oriented at designing, or will contain practical elements. The first project is an example of so-called design-based learning and focuses on getting experience in design. In this form of education, ample room is given to the acquisition of academic skills, such as reflecting on one’s own actions, performing critical analyses of design problems, interpreting design requirements broadly and integrating contemporary scientific knowledge and insights.


A range of elective courses (see appendix F) provides students with a broad spectrum of possibilities to specialize in one of the SET sub-areas. But there are also courses aiming at broadening the horizon of the students into the direction of sustainable energy technologies and system integration. In any case the optional courses are intended to adequately introduce the students into their research and/or design tasks of the graduation project. Therefore, the courses are selected by the students in consultation with the graduation supervisor (see below).


The graduation project will be performed in one of the six theme-groups selected for SET:

Solar Energy, Wind energy, Biomass, Hydrogen, Intelligent electricity networks and Transition policy.

Graduation is carried out in one of the research laboratories of the cooperating departments under supervision of a professor from one of the participating groups in the M.Sc.-programme. Graduation projects can be carried out in one of the fields mentioned in appendix G. Graduation projects in industry may also be possible.

The graduation project in one of the theme groups and the accompanying Master’s thesis is primarily meant to gain in-depth experience in research and/or design. Students will learn to explore and formulate new research questions regarding sustainable energy technologies or closely related fundamental issues. Students will learn the pitfalls of exploring unknown territories and develop skills to circumvent these, while gaining the understanding that abstraction and simplification are their important tools for success.






Table 3 Relation between course parts and domain specific requirements

Relation between course parts and final attainment level: domain specific requirements

Course name








scientific attitude

engineering skills

expertise

disciplinary knowledge

evaluate energy systems

design energy systems

evaluate energy systems in societal context

analyse system innovations

expert in one SET sub-area

form an opinion, contribute to discussions

skilled in presenting and documenting

communicate to colleagues and public

Technology for sustainable development




x


x


x

x


x



Renewable energy sources


x

x


x



x


x



Physical transport phenomena

Transport phenomena

x


x

x









Reactor Technology

x


x

x









Energy conversion

Energy systems


x

x

x


x





x

x

Electrical power engineering and system integration


x

x

x

x

x


x





Design methodology


x

x


x

x


x



x


Energy from biomass

x

x

x

x





x




Solar energy

x

x

x

x

x

x


x

x




Energy and consumer



x

x

x


x



x



Energy and economy

Institutional economics of energy



x

x

x


x



x



System integration project I (group)


x

x


x

x

x

x


x

x

x

Hydrogen technology

x

x

x

x

x

x



x


x


Wind energy

x

x

x

x

x

x

x


x




System innovation and strategic niche management

x


x


x


x


x




System integration project II (individual)

x


x

x





x


x

x



























Elective courses

x

x

x

x





x




Graduation project

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x










Table 4: Relation between course parts and general and scientific requirements

Relation between course parts and final attainment level: general and scientific requirements

Course name








crosses boundaries of SET-domain

reflects on complete scope

potential to contribute to research

oral and written communication

habit to reflect

operates in a team

knows compromises are unavoidable

makes decisions based on calculated risks

uses models adequately and knows their limitation

takes into consideration disadvantages of design decisions

able to implement life-long learning

Technology for sustainable development

x

x





x

x

x

x


Renewable energy sources


x





x

x

x

x

x

Physical transport phenomena

Transport phenomena

x








x



Energy conversion

Energy systems




x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Reactor Technology

x








x



Electrical power engineering and system integration

x

x



x


x

x

x

x


Design methodology

x

x


x

x

x

x

x


x


Energy from biomass



x

x


x

x

x

x


x

Solar energy



x

x


x

x

x

x


x

Energy and consumer

x

x



x


x

x


x


Energy and economy

Institutional economics of energy

x

x



x


x

x


x


System integration project I (group)

x

x


x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Hydrogen technology

x


x

x



x

x

x


x

Wind energy



x

x

x


x

x

x


x

System innovation and strategic niche management

x

x


x

x




x

x

x

System integration project II (individual)

x

x

x

x

x


x

x

x

x

x

























Elective courses

x


x




x

x

x


x

Graduation project


x

x

x

x


x

x

x

x

x










3.5Master’s programme study load

The study load of the Master’s programme is 120 EC (European Credit Transfer System) divided equally over the six semester terms. Most of the compulsory courses are finished using a regular written exam that can be done twice a year. In about one third of the courses one or more assignments are made that contribute to the final grade. The working load of the students is being monitored on a regular base. Twice each term students will have the opportunity to evaluate and comment on the courses followed.


In the Master’s thesis project supervisors will make use of a strict monitoring system to detect whether students are able to finish their Master’s project in time. This allows intervention in a timely and appropriate fashion.


On the basis of experience with other comparable programmes of the 3 universities and of programmes abroad, the ambition is that about 75% of the students will finish this Master’s programme in the time planned.


3.6Academic support facilities

A study progress registration system (SVR) will register the number of credits obtained by students in every semester. Twice a year all students will receive a review of their study progress and in addition all students can access their situation with respect to progress at any time via their notebooks. If, for one reason or the other, information is not available electronically, students can receive information from the information desk of the Educational Office. All outputs of the SVR will be published once a year and serve policymaking and remedial actions.

In all phases of the programmes the student counsellor will coach students with their planning and assist in solving study related problems. The student counsellor operates within a university-wide network of advisors and can also redirect students to the university psychologists. The student counsellor will convey important course and programme information to the students.

Students who lag behind or are in danger of lagging behind will be contacted for a discussion of their situation in which the counsellor will evaluate the situation and advise on possible measures. At the end of the first year, a written individual study advice will be given to each student. Of course students are also welcome to visit the student counsellor on their own initiative to discuss, among others, their study progress and planning.

At the institutional level the Student Service Centre will provide additional academic support services to the students.

3.7Admission

Sustainable Energy Technology is intended to be an interdisciplinary and interdepartmental master programme. Therefore, a choice has to be made between giving students of certain bachelor programmes unconditional entrance to the programme (Doorstroommaster) or to develop an admission procedure for all students regardless their prior education (Selective master). The choice has been made for the first option since the participating departments believe the students with a bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, Applied Physics and Advanced Technology all qualify directly for the M.Sc. Sustainable Energy Technology.

Students with a bachelor degree in Technology and Society (with energy specialization) or related studies will also be admitted directly, provided that they have successfully completed a relevant Minor-programme.

There are three target groups for the programme:

1.Bachelor students from technical and related science programmes at Dutch universities;

2.Bachelor students from polytechnic colleges for higher education (in particular energy technology);

3.Bachelor students from technical and related science programmes at foreign universities.

People with professional experience may participate in the programme as well, provided they have the proper basic knowledge (minimum level: polytechnic college for higher education). Furthermore, a modular-based approach offers this group the opportunity to participate in the programme on a part-time basis.


Admission for these groups is based on the following criteria:

Ad 1. Students of the B.Sc.-programmes of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Physics, Advanced Technology, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Installation Technology and Technology Management (+ relevant Minor) of TU/e, TUD and UT, can join the programme without additional requirements. Students from other technical B.Sc.-programmes of Dutch universities can get admission after following a pre-master programme which is decided by the admission committee based on the contents of the B.Sc.-programme followed by the student.

Ad 2. Bachelor students from polytechnic colleges for higher education in areas comparable to those mentioned ad. 1. are admitted to the programme after successfully completing a standard pre-master programme which can be followed at the department which is closest to the B.Sc.-programme in question.

Ad 3 Applicants with a bachelor diploma from foreign universities will have to submit their credentials to the admission office of the TU/e, UT or TUDelft. The office will check the level of education, the ability to follow the programme in the English language and some requirements with regard to the ability of the student to be able to acquire a visa. The admission office will give an indication of the education level to the admission committee of the master programme. The committee will decide on admission.



3.8Duration

The Master programme Sustainable Energy Technology consists of 120 ects. From an educational point of view, it requires a full-time student 2 years to realize the required competencies finish.

The Master programme Sustainable Energy Technology has a strong focus on

teaching Research skills and on further orientation on social sciences.

Programme’s exit qualifications are such that they guarantee the programmes

interdisciplinary character.

The master to be delivered should reflect this interdisciplinary nature both in the level of

knowledge and in the ability to integrate systems.

Technical universities abroad that offer a comparable range of technological and social sciences regarding sustainable energy all assume a study load of more than 60 ECTS.

In connection with the exit levels that are internationally desired, it is therefore demonstrably necessary to have a study load of more than 60 ECTS.

This is also in agreement with the general acceptance in The Netherlands of the graduation level of a technical master.





4Human resources efforts

The master programme Sustainable Energy Technologies is an interdepartmental programme. Teaching staff from different departments contributes to the teaching programme (see table 5).


Table 5a: TU/e staff involved in teaching the M.Sc. programme


Name


Job title course responsible


Course


Department

Prof.dr.ir. A.A. van Steenhoven

Dr.ir. H.P. van Kemenade

Dr.ir. H.C. de Lange

Professor TU/e

Energy conversion

Mechanical Engineering

Prof.dr. L.P.H. de Goey

Dr.ir. R.J.M. Bastiaans

Dr.Ir. J.A. van Oijen

Professor TU/e

Energy from biomass

Mechanical Engineering

Prof.dr.ir. R.J.C. van Zolingen

Guest lecturers

Professor TU/e

Renewable energy sources

Mechanical Engineering

Prof.dr.ir. J.C. Schouten

dr. E. Rebrov

Dr. M.H.J.M. de Croon

Professor TU/e

Hydrogen technology

Chemical Engineering and Chemistry

Dr. G.J.W. van Bussel

Associate professor TUD

Wind Energy

Aerospace engineering

Prof.dr.ir. A.J.A. Vandenput

Dr.ing. J.M.A. Myrzik

Dr. E. Lomonova

Dr.ing. A.J.M. Pemen

Dr. J.L. Duarte

Professor TU/e

Electrical power engineering and system integration

Electrical Engineering

Prof.dr.ir. M.E.H. v. Dongen

Dr.ir. J.C.H. Zeegers

Professor TU/e

Physical transport phenomena

Applied physics

Prof.dr.ir. M.C.M. v.d. Sanden

Prof.dr.ir. R.A.J. Janssen

prof dr ir R. van Zolingen

Professor TU/e

Solar energy

Applied Physics

Prof.dr. C.J.H. Midden

Dr. L.T. Mccalley

Professor TU/e

Energy and consumer

Technology Management

Dr.ir. W.J.H. van Groenendaal

Associate proffesor UvT

Energy and Economy

Economics and Business Administration

Dr.ir. G.P.J. Verbong

Dr.Ir. R.P.J.M. Raven

Associate professor TU/e

System innovation and strategic niche management

Technology Management

Prof.ir. W. Zeiler

Professor TU/e

Design methodology

Building and Architecture

Dr.ir. A.M.C. Lemmens

Ir. A.F. Kirkels

Programme director

Technology for sustainable development

System integration project I (group)

Mechanical Engineering



Elective courses


Full-time professor


System integration project II (individual)


Full-time professor


Graduation project (M.Sc.-thesis)








Table 5b: UT staff involved in teaching the M.Sc. program


Name


Job title


Course


Department

Prof.dr.ir. Th.H. van der Meer

Professor UT

Transport phenomena

Mechanical Engineering

Prof. dr. J.T.A. Bressers

Dr. J. Clancy


Ir. R. de Leeuw

Ir. M. Toxopeus

Professor UT

assistant Professor UT

assistant professor UT

assistant professor UT

Technology and sustainable development

Business, Public Administration and Technology



Mechanical Engineering

Prof.dr.ir. J.A.M. Kuipers

Dr.ir. M. Van Sint Annaland

Professor. UT


Assistant Professor UT

Reactor Technology

Chemical Engineering

Prof.dr.ir. Th.H. van der Meer

dr. S.A. Kersten


ir. E.A. Bramer

Professor UT


assistant Professor UT

assistant Professor UT

Energy from biomass

Chemical Engineering

Prof.dr.ir.H.W.M. Hoeijmakers

Professor UT

Contribution to the course wind energy

Mechanical Engineering

Prof.dr.ir. J.A.M. Kuipers

Dr.ir. M. Van Sint Annaland

Prof. L. Lefferts

Dr. K. Seshan

Professor. UT


Assistant Professor, UT

Professor UT

Assistant professor UT

Contributions to the course Hydrogen

Chemical Engineering

Dr. J.B.W. Kok

Associate Professor UT

Energy systems

Mechanical Engineering

Prof. dr.ir. F.J.A.M. van Houten

Dr. A.H.M.E. Reinders

Professor UT


assistant Professor UT

Solar energy

Mechanical Engineering

Dr. M.J. Arentsen

Associate professor UT

System innovation and strategic niche management

Business, Public Administration and Technology

Dr. M.J. Arentsen,

Dr. J. Clancy

Associate professor UT

assistant professor UT

Institutional economics of energy

Business, Public Administration and Technology

Prof. F.J.A.M. van Houten

Prof. A.O Eger

professor UT


professor UT

Design methodology

Engineering Technology



Elective courses


Full-time professor


System integration project II (individual)


Full-time professor


Graduation project (M.Sc.-thesis)




Table 5c: TUD staff involved in teaching the M.Sc. programme


Name

Job title

Course

Department

Prof.ir. L. van der Sluis

Dr.ir. M.J. Hoeijmakers

Dr.ir. H. Polinder


Dr.ir. P.H.

Schavemaker

Professor TUD


Associate Professor-TUD

Associate Professor-TUD

Assistant Professor-TUD

Electrical Power Engineering

Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computers Science


Prof.dr.ir. H.E.A. van den Akker

Professor TUD

Advanced Flow and Transport Phenomena

Applied Sciences

Prof.dr.ir. J.C. Brezet

Ir. H.L. Hellman

Ir. P. van Gennip

Professor TUD


Ph.D. Student-TUD

Researcher-TUD

Design Methodology

Industrial Design



Dr.Ir. W. de Jong






Dr.ir. J.R. van Ommen

Assistant Professor-TUD





Assistant Professor-TUD

Energy from biomass

Mechanical Engineering, Materials Engineering & Marine Engineering (3ME)

Applied Sciences

Prof.dr. L.D.A. Siebbeles

Dr. M. Zeman


Dr.ir. T.J. Savenije


Dr. A. Goossens

Professor TUD


Associate Professor-TUD

Assistant Professor-TUD

Associate Professor-TUD

Solar Energy

Applied Sciences


DIMES


Applied Sciences


Applied Sciences

Prof.dr. J. Schoonman



Dr. E.M. Kelder


Dr.ir. R. van de Krol


Dr.ir. C.J. Peters

Professor TUD




Assistant Professor-TUD

Assistant Professor-TUD

Associate Professor-TUD

Sustainable Hydrogen and Electrical Energy Storage

Applied Sciences




Applied Sciences


Applied Sciences


Applied Sciences

Ir. N. Woudstra

Assistant Professor-TUD

Fuel cell systems

Mechanical Engineering, Materials Engineering & Marine Engineering (3ME)

Prof.dr.ir. G.A.M. van Kuik

Dr.Ir. G.J.W. van Bussel

Professor TUD


Associate Professor-TUD

Wind Energy

Aerospace Engineering

Aerospace Engineering



Elective courses


Full-time professor


System integration project II (individual


Full-time professor


Graduation project (M.Sc.-thesis)




(Right from the beginning experts from outside of the university will be involved in the course programme. Staff members from the Wind Energy, Electrical Power Systems and Energy Technology units of TUD and the section Thermal Engineering of the department of Mechanical Engineering of UT will be involved as supervisors of M.Sc.-research projects)



Although most of the courses are designed specifically for this programme, they fit very well into the current educational and research activities of the lecturers concerned. Many of the programme staff holds a full professorate. Almost all staff has a PhD degree. In the System Integration Project I qualified and experienced lecturers supervise the groups and the disciplinary expertise is provided by experts from university or industry. All staff members involved are amply qualified to ensure the proper supervision of the programme and to develop and implement processes for the evaluation, assessment, and continuing improvement of the programme, its educational objectives and outcomes.
























4.1WO requirements

The staff has been recruited from the best researchers available at the different departments (see appendix H). Many of the participating staff members have a full professorate. For the other staff members responsible for a disciplinary course a minimal requirement is a PhD degree, sufficient publications, educational experience and preferably international experience. The full and associate professors and several of the assistant professors involved in the programme are leading in their fields. The staff has 40% of their time available for research and personal development. This guarantees a continuous refreshment and enhancement of knowledge and skills.


4.2Staff quantity

Staff quantity can be derived from tables 5 and 6 in the preceding paragraph. Teaching staff available for the course work is adequate – both qualitatively and quantitatively – now and in the foreseeable future. In the different participating departments there are sufficiently qualified researchers who can supervise M.Sc. research projects in their own disciplinary areas. In the theme groups the approaches of the different disciplines meet each other. In order to build-up expertise and research experience on these interfaces TU/e has made funds available to stimulate the appointment of three SET fellows (mentioned before in the introduction). These are researchers who are employed for a period of 5 years. The departments have committed themselves to make this position of a SET-fellow a permanent one after these initial five years. The SET-fellows are assigned to those theme-groups where their efforts are most needed. One will strengthen the biomass theme since here the contribution comes from many different departments and integration is very difficult. The second fellow is assigned to the hydrogen theme-group since here the research cooperation is still in a build-up-phase. The third fellow still has to be assigned to one of the remaining theme groups.

The input of the supporting staff will have to increase with growing students numbers. The department of Mechanical Engineering will assume responsibility for this issue.


4.3Staff quality

The staff requirements are already indicated in paragraph 4.1. The quality can be derived from the short curricula vita as presented in appendix G.

There is an extended quality assurance mechanism in place as is explained in chapter 6.

5Facilities

There is not any doubt that the three technical universities can accommodate the M.Sc. programme Sustainable Energy Technology. All three universities are very well equipped for this type of technical programme. In that respect this programme does not differ from other master programmes like Mechanical Engineering or Civil Engineering. For the first year of the programme use can be made of the available lecture rooms, rooms for project groups, libraries etc. In their final year the students will have their domicile in one of the research groups under the guidance of a full professor. Here he or she will be accommodated with an office and full access to all the available facilities, like desk with telephone and internet access.





5.1General services

At the TU/e the master programme will be accommodated by the department of Mechanical Engineering.


Figure 5.1.1 Main building of the Mechanical Engineering Department


At the UT the accommodation will be provided by the faculty of Engineering Technology. At TUDelft the faculty of Applied Sciences is responsible for this Master’s programme. All facilities present at these departments will be made available for this M.Sc. programme.


5.2Library facilities and other learning resources

The three universities have very advanced library facilities with documentation centres open for all students. The catalogues of these libraries are connected to each other and it is possible for the students to search for material at another location. Several bibliographic files are available for searching for scientific literature. The library facilities of the three universities are very advanced in this respect.

All kind of other learning resources will be made available by the Electronic Learning Environment. The regular shops will be used for selling course materials.

5.3ICT facilities

Nowadays, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) plays a crucial role in our education.

The three universities have a very powerful network infrastructure connected to the Worldwide Internet. Network connections are widely available in the university buildings. Since most student is provided with a notebook computer (In Eindhoven all b.Sc. and M.Sc.students are provided with a laptop, in UT all B.Sc. students are provided with a laptop) the provision of workstations and PCs has become less relevant. However for many tasks, more powerful or dedicated hardware and software are still required. So, in addition to the distributed notebook computer power, the SET students can make use of a variety of dedicated, up-to-date facilities in the labs of the different departments. Finally, they have the possibility of using supercomputer facilities elsewhere in the Netherlands. For a good and efficient exchange of course material an ELO will be used. This provides optimal communication possibilities between students and lecturers using the Internet. This is important especially for the courses for which students and lecturers are not at the same location

5.4Video conferencing room

SET-students can make use of the video conferencing facilities. Students from one location can follow lectures at other universities. Groups of students are also able to use these facilities, for example, in a project, in which they co-operate in a team with students of another (foreign) University.


5.5Academic support facilities

In addition to one education director the SET-programme for the total M.Sc. programme, at every location a Master’s programme coordinator, a student counsellor and supporting staff assigned to support the students will be available.

The student counsellor gives personal support to all students with questions about the programme and their individual study environment. The student counsellor schedules a number of evaluation interviews with each student.

For the international students additional arrangements will be made. The programme coordinator is also the international relations coordinator and provides the special guidance most international students need.


At the institutional level the Student Service Centres and the International Offices in Eindhoven, Delft and Twente provide academic support services to the graduate (international) student. The International Offices (IO) have a permanent task force within the Staff Group of the Student Service Centre and are responsible for policy making and implementation in the domains of international scientific collaboration, student exchange, Bachelor’s and Master’s students advice. The IO’s are responsible for many support tasks to create conditions to make international exchange for students possible. Issues such as insurance, support and information on exchange programme’s; funding, admission and visa application, English courses and introduction and so on all belong to the responsibilities of the IO.




5.6Office facilities

In the final year of their study the students will be facilitated one of the research groups. Here they will do their final assignments in one of the available laboratories, like the biomass lab. or the solar lab. in Eindhoven, or the lab. of Thermal Engineering in Twente.

Figure 5.6.1. laboratory of Thermal Engineering



6Methods of assessment and system of quality control


As indicated before, the master programme Sustainable Energy Technology will be hosted by the department of Mechanical Engineering at the TU/e, the faculty of Engineering Technology at the UT and faculty of Applied Sciences at TUD. The methods of assessment and the quality control system of these departments, therefore also apply to this programme. In the ABET accreditation of the Mechanical Engineering programme at TU/e of 2002 the quality system and assessment were judged as being more than adequate.

6.1Methods of assessment

The master’s programme comprises specialization courses, a multidisciplinary integration project based on mixture of didactical models (project-led education and/or design based learning (DBL) (see before), a traineeship and the final graduation assignment.


For the courses the traditional written examination is still widely used. Some courses are concluded with an oral examination or by carrying out an individual task. In general the written examinations are based on open-ended problems. A substantial part of them are so-called open-book examinations and for a growing number the use of a notebook with some specific software programme is necessary. Most courses have a practical part in which the knowledge acquired during the lectures is brought into practice. These labs do not directly give the staff member information about the progress of an individual student but it gives very important information about the processing of the lectures and the bottleneck’s in the application skills for the group of students.


For each of the DBL cases the project coordinator defines a number of specific educational goals. This project coordinator in combination with the group’s tutor assesses to what extent the work of the group and the contribution of the individual team member meet the specific objectives. The assessment of DBL has two components, namely a group component and an individual component. The group component relates to the group product, which is assessed by the case study coordinator. In this assessment, in addition to aspects pertaining to content, aspects of style also play a role. The individual component concerns the functioning of each individual student within the group. The tutor assesses this. For this assessment, he takes account of both the aspects relating to content and the group aspects.


Through the traineeship, students can gear themselves to or acquaint themselves with the graduation field. Compared with the final project, the traineeships are smaller, are often sub-projects and often offer less scope for creativity. In the final project, the student works independently on the solution of a problem. Using the skills and knowledge acquired in the B.Sc. and the first curriculum year, the student exercises and demonstrates the ability to work at the level of an engineer. In many cases the work is carried out in research teams around PhD projects and will contribute to one of the department’s research programmes or it takes place in industry under more or less the same conditions. The assessment of the traineeship is based on the analyzing capacity, self-reliance, experimental abilities, a written report and mostly an oral presentation.


During this final part of the study the student gets involved in the ongoing fundamental or applied research in the department. In this context, students take part in department colloquia, progress meetings, consultation with researchers and designers from outside the department. The assessment of the final project is based on the analyzing capacity, creativity, self-reliance, written report, the oral presentation and discussion for a broad audience and the separate, final defense for the examination committee.


6.2System of quality control


The system of quality assurance is considered a vital system to ensure the quality of the Sustainable Energy Technology programme. Essential is that all the relevant stakeholders involved are approached in the process (external contacts, alumni, staff, students).


The system to be used can be summarized in a few general statements:

-The system of quality control is aimed at the improvement of the programme

-The system of quality control is aimed at controlling the following elements:

oQualifications of the graduates (objectives and goals of the programme)

oStructure and contents of the programme

oEfficiency of the programme (intake and flow of the students and quality of the staff)

oOrganization of the education (quality of staff and adequacy of the facilities)

oThe quality system itself

-The quality assurance system is also focused on realizing the requirements of the accreditation legislation

-For quality control of the SET programme the quality control system at place in the Mechanical Engineering department (TU/e), Engineering Technology (UT) and the faculty of Applied sciences (TUD) will be used

-The Education (programme) director is responsible for implementing the measures to improve the programme

-The outcomes of the quality assurance system will be systematically introduced and discussed in the committee that is responsible for the programme. The education director is heading this team

-The qualifications and the structure of the programme are evaluated in a 3-year cycle. In this process at least the external contacts and the benchmark partners are consulted.

-Every six year an external review is carried out as part of the mandatory accreditation cycle. Well before the external review takes place an internal review is carried out based on the guidelines for the external review procedures (of NVAO). External contacts are invited to be part of the panel that evaluates the internal review.

An overview of the Quality Control System is given in table 8 on the next page. Some important elements of the system are further explained below.


In order to know how the programme objectives relate to the instructional goals and how the measurements demonstrate the desired results all forms of education will be evaluated periodically.

Besides the evaluation of curriculum parts clusters of courses, semesters, years and the whole curriculum will be evaluated. Not only the quality of the courses, but also the validity of the assessment will be involved in the evaluation. Additionally the connection between the curriculum and the research schools and research institutes will be evaluated periodically. The graduates and postgraduates will be asked to give an assessment of the value of their education for industry in order to improve the connection between the university study and the demands of modern trade and industry.



Table 6 Overview of quality control system

Focus areas

Parts

Time

Actions

Methods

Stakeholders

Reports

Follow-up

Focus A

Objectives and goals


Check

Mission, objectives and goals of the programme

3-yearly



yearly

examine whether the objectives are still valid


evaluating the objectives in relation to the requirements of the labour market and bench mark partners

evaluating the objectives in relation to the programme

research and analysis



analysis of performance-indicators

Labour market

Alumni

Students

Staff

Reports of the external consultations

internal reports,


annual report for domestic and external use

Discussions in team of lectures

Implementation of follow up measures

professionalizing and coaching of co-workers

discussion with FB and OC *

Focus B

Content of the education





Check

Structure and content of the programme


3-yearly



yearly




each semester

examine whether the content of the curriculum is executed properly

examine whether the content of the curriculum is still up to date




evaluate parts of the curriculum

Evaluation by external contacts in relation to the objectives and goals of the programme

evaluation of the courses, of each trimester, of each year, analysis of the achieved results


postal surveys / interviews / gather information by listening

Labour market

Alumni

Students

Staff

survey of the curriculum / content of the courses in the guidebook and on the worldwide web


reports to OC *

Discussions in team of lectures

Implementation of follow up measures

Discussions with lecturers about improving education, professionalization of co- workers


discussions with lecturers and enter into an agreement about the continuation

Focus C

Educational Process


Check

Educational Services

Do-ability of the curriculum

yearly




each semester

examine whether the educational process is executed properly



evaluate parts of the curriculum

see B




postal surveys / interviews / gather information by observing

Students

Staff

Alumni

see B




reports to OC *

see B and educational professionalization and coaching of co workers


discussions with lecturers and enter into an agreement

Focus D

Efficiency of Education



Check

Intake of students

Flow of students

Efficiency

yearly





yearly

analysis and control of index numbers





analysis index numbers

survey of the results of examination, facts and figures about inflow and outflow of students


follow procedure registration

progress of study

Students

Staff

Alumni

internal reports





survey of facts and figures about relevant matters

Discussions in team of lectures

Implementation of follow up measures incl. precautions to avoid bottlenecks and pressure points

monitoring on the basis of index numbers

Focus E

Organization of the Education




Check

Effectiveness

Quality plan

Quality staff

Facilities

Provision


3-yearly






yearly

examine and investigate organizational plan including quality plan in relation to the goals of the programme and in relation to the programme itself



readjust plans

postal surveys / interviews / focus groups / analysis of comparisons on the basis of documents


pick up signals

Alumni

Students

Staff

internal reports en guidebook




report to OC *

Discussions the team of lectures

Implementation of follow up measures incl. precautions to avoid bottlenecks


evaluation of the readjustments

Focus F

Alumni

external contacts internationalization


check

Quality of the graduates

Internationalization and external contacts

3-yearly






yearly

survey of the social status of graduates;

external contacts and foreign relations

examine the frictions between the quality of the graduates and the demands of the society and the science


annual report

postal surveys / interviews / group comparisons





postal surveys and interview

WO-Monitor External supervisors

Alumni

Students

Staff

internal reports






reports to the OC *

Discussions in the team of lectures

Implementation of follow up measures

on the basis of the vested information take action to improve the national and international position of the faculty


* FB (FaculteitsBestuur): Departmental Board; OC (OpleidingsCommissie): Curriculum Committee

A distinction will be made between a reactive and pro-active component in the system for internal quality assessment. The reactive component consists of identification, analysis, improvement and feedback. Systematic education assessment is an instrument in pointing out bottlenecks in the field of the ability to complete -parts of- the programme in the given time and to evaluate the educational quality. Recording study progress data is a similar identification instrument. The next step consists of further analyzing possible bottlenecks. This will result in specific actions to eliminate or prevent these bottlenecks in order to actually improve the educational quality. Finally, data and actions concerning the ability to complete -parts of- the programme in the given time and educational quality become visible by announcing them to staff members and students (feedback).

The pro-active component will mainly focus on improving the educational and pedagogic competences of the staff. Because of the fact that the courses in the programme are given in English also attention will be given to the abilities of teaching in English and the pedagogic competences to teach a group of students with a different cultural background.


In Eindhoven the Educational Service Centre (ESC) and the Centre for Communication Language and Technique (CTT) are partners in this. The CTT will evaluate each staff member that is involved in English teaching for the first time. If necessary, CTT will discuss a plan of action with the staff member. This plan can contain language courses provided by CTT and/or pedagogic courses provided by ESC. The ESC is a university institution that provides educational services to the departments. The ESC has a permanent staff member to support the department of Mechanical Engineering, including the SET programme in the quality care of the DBL component. It is organizing (together with the ME department) the introductory tutor training for each new staff member. For the purpose of the general educational and improvement of the didactical part of the profession, the quality assessment staff member and the head of the personnel department will keep in close contact with the ESC. For each new staff member a three year, extensive Education Training Plan is defined in which the individual courses, workshops and plans are formulated. This also has to be a trigger for the new-staff member for an active approach of his or her portfolio.

There are different ways in which a threshold level for the didactical quality of the tutors in DBL will be guaranteed. Firstly, every staff member will take the initial tutor course before doing his first tutorship. In the past, this training course, that was already offered to staff of the Mechanical Engineering department, was optimized on the basis of evaluations: the emphasis is now more on simulating practical situations. This training is also extended with three new parts: assessing individual students, observing a real DBL group with a full evaluation of the observations and coaching-on-the-job by the ESC staff member.

Almost the same as mentioned above, applies to the UT (Twente), where the Educational Service Centre of ITBE (Information Technology, Library and Education) focuses on bundling those activities, aimed at further improving the training provided by the UT, and making it more flexible and efficient. Amongst these activities are providing the introductory tutor training and to provide support to various target groups in the area of communication in English & other modern foreign languages and in working with international groups by means of the TCP (Taal Coördinatie Punt)

At TU Delft, The Institute of Technology & Communication (part of the Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management)is responsible for initial and advanced staff training. Courses and workshops are given on various topics such as Active and collaborative learning, Spoken English for lecturers, Working with groups of international students, Designing e-learning environments, Assessment, Project-oriented learning and
individual coaching.
There is also a 200 hours route to a Certificate "Teaching Qualification
for Higher Education", based on courses and a portfolio.

6.3Student involvement in quality control

Student involvement in quality management will for instance be evident in their participation in the Curriculum Committee: OC (Opleidingscommissie). Members of the OC are appointed by the department board. The OC comprises of six members. Of these six members, three must be students. The other three are staff members. The programme director and the student advisor are, in an advisory capacity, present in the meetings of the OC.

The tasks of the OC are:

To advise the programme director and the department board on all issues relevant to the academic programme.

To advise the programme director and the department board on the contents of the Educational and Exam Regulation: OER (Onderwijs- en ExamenReglement);

To annually evaluate the implementation of the OER;

At the end of the period there is an official evaluation of all new parts of the curriculum and those that for any reason need specific attention (see also section 6.2). The more general results of these assessments are discussed with the students in the OC.


In the first years student involvement in the quality process will also be arranged through their involvement in an assessment group. Twice every period students will be asked to comment in a more informal way on the courses and other parts of the curriculum in the past period and to comment at an early stage on the courses and projects started in the actual period. The course director and student counsellor will take action where necessary.


7Continuity conditions

From the strategic choice made by the Boards of Directors of TU/e, UT and TUD to establish and support the M.Sc. programme Sustainable Energy Technology and from the commitment and support of the Departmental Boards of all participating departments it is clear that there is a strong will to create continuity conditions for the programme.


7.1Guaranteed completion

It is a normal procedure at the three universities, laid down in the Educational and Exam Regulation (OER), that students that start a study programme are guaranteed that the study programme will always be arranged in such a way that these students will have the opportunity to complete the programme. Of course it depends on the abilities and performance of the students themselves whether they will indeed complete the programme. The experience in other programmes is that all students starting the programme have ample opportunities for completion. Courses and exams are offered with sufficient frequency (at least twice a year) for students to complete the programme in time.


7.2Financial Analysis

Cost-effectiveness is crucial for the long-term viability of the proposed programme. Cost-effectiveness is primarily dependent on the number of students following the programme. Table 7 gives a prediction of the students which will be in the programme for the first four years.


Table 7 Expected students in the master programme Sustainable Energy Technology (for the three universities)

 

Study start date

2006/2007

2007/2008

2008/2009

2009/2010

Year totals

Number of students per generation

year 1

 30

40

 50

 60

180

Number of students per generation

year 2


 26

 34

 40

100

Number of students per generation

year 3



 3

7

Number of students per generation

year 4




 0

0








 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Except for the costs of the development of the programme, that are largely covered by the “Impulsgelden”, the more structural costs for exploitation of the programme are embodied in the financial model of the universities.





7.3Investments

The investments necessary to start and run the programme are very modest. This is the case because existing facilities are used. There are some start-up cost with regard to furnishing offices and starting a PR campaign. It is estimated that k€ 100 is to cover these costs in the first two years.











Appendix D:


Course descriptions of the UTwente courses (Core curriculum)



Technology and sustainable development


Teaching staff: Dr Joy Clancy or colleague (CSTM / TSD); Ir Rianne de Leeuw (CSTM / Cartesius Instituut), ir. M. Toxopeus, (CTW)


Content:

§Basics of sustainability

owhat is sustainability, how does it relate to production and consumption patterns, how is it achieved.

omain environmental problems, some figures, and their causes

owhy active involvement is needed: market imperfection: not always a price needs to be paid for scarce resources, leading to inefficiencies

ocan development be sustainable?

§Sustainability in North-south perspective


§Technology and sustainability: what can technology contribute?

oDecoupling of economy and resource use , renewable and non-renewable resources

othe role of technology in addressing / solving environmental problems (several approaches / initiatives e.g. industrial ecology, green products,/..)

ostrategies and starting points for improving production processes and products, sustainable design


§Tools to assess the contribution of technology and financial aspects of technological changes

otechnical tools: LCA (e.g. using excel model that I made for a project on magnesium’s production, which involves much energy use), flow sheets, mass and energy balances, ecological footprint. Energy analyses .

ofinancial tools (making decisions about investments in cleaner products and / or production processes): at firm level (Net Present Value, Pay back, cost benefit analysis) and national levels (cost benefit analysis, alternatives for Gross National Product)

omethods for valuing scarce resources (contingent valuation, travel cost pricing, etc.)


§society and sustainability

ohuman behaviour and sustainability; changing human behaviour.

owhat government can do (legal instruments, financial incentives, collaborative approaches)

oTransition management (as being the approach taken by Dutch Government)


Transport phenomena


Language

English

Description

Het college concentreert zich op de fysisch mathematische modellering van het transport van warmte, impuls en materie. Uitgangspunt zijn de behoudswetten. Behandeld worden stationaire diffusie, instationaire diffusie, diffusie met chemische reacties, diffusie in stromende media. Voor voorbeelden uit de proces- en energietechnologie worden differentiaalvergelijkingen met randvoorwaarden opgesteld en analytische oplossingen gegenereerd en geanalyseerd. De analytische oplossingen worden tevens vergeleken met numeriek verkregen oplossingen.

Naast een hoorcollege worden werkcolleges gegeven voor het leren werken met analytische oplossingen. Tevens is er een computerprakticum (CFD) voor het genereren van numerieke oplossingen.

Objective

To learn to translate a physical problem into its mathematical description

Target group

Werktuigbouwkunde (WB)

 

Fase 

D3

Kwartiel 

K1



Mechanical Engineering (ME)

 

Fase 

M

Kwartiel 

K1




Collegevormen

HC Hoorcollege, WC Werkcollege

Aanwezigheidsverpl.

, werkcolleges zijn wel verplicht

Contacturen p/w

8

Tentamenvorm

Schriftelijk tentamen

Voorkennis

Verplicht:

 

bachelor courses like introduction into Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer


Studiebelasting

5.0 EC

Contactpersoon

prof.dr.ir. T.H. van der Meer

Docenten

prof.dr.ir. T.H. van der Meer

Studiemateriaal

Boek: Bird Stewart and Lightfoot. Transport Phenomena, 2nd Edition R. Byron, Warren E. Stewart, Edwin N. Lightfoot. ISBN: 0-471-41077-2 Hardcover, 920 pages, April 2003, Euro 58,90


Energy systems




Studiejaar

2002

Vakbeschrijving

Het vak 'Energiesystemen' borduurt voort op het 1e jaarsvak 'Technische thermodynamica'. Van een aantal energiesystemen wordt de procestechnologische opbouw behandeld en vindt een thermodynamische analyse plaats. Naast de exergie-analyse wordt aandacht besteed aan pinch analyse, en de economie van energiesystemen. Specifiek wordt ingegaan op grootschalige energieopwekkings- en conversiesystemen. In toenemende mate wordt aandacht besteed aan nieuwe energie- conversiesystemen zoals warmtepompen, brandstofcellen en duurzame opwekking. Biomassa conversie krijgt in dit kader extra aandacht.

Deeln. opleiding

Chemische Technologie (CT)

 

Fase 

D3

Trimester 

3



Technische Bedrijfskunde (TBK)

 

Fase 

D3

Trimester 

3



Werktuigbouwkunde (WB)

 

Fase 

D3

Trimester 

3




Collegevormen

HC Hoorcollege

Tentamenvorm

Schriftelijke opdracht

Voorkennis

Noodzakelijk:

 

114101 Technische thermodynamica

 

114503 Ketenbeheer


Studiebelasting

3.6 EC

Docenten

dr. J.B.W. Kok

Studiemateriaal

Collegedictaat



Electrical power engineering and system integration


This course will not be given in Twente. The course from Eindhoven will be made suitable for e-learning. See for a description of this course the Eindhoven description




Design methodology


The number of available courses on this subject in Twente is numerous. It is proposed to reconsider the contents of the Eindhoven course and to have this course be given by Twente University. For the time being see the contents of the Eindhoven course. It is aimed to converge to a new content a.s.a.p.


Energy from biomass


For this course see the description of Eindhoven. It has been agreed by the lecturers at the three locations to change the contents of the Eindhoven course into:

7 lectures from the present Eindhoven course (without the practicum, the exercises and the part on combustion, gasification and pyrolysis.

5 lectures on combustion, gasification and pyrolysis from material available at Twente university

1 lecture with a local flavour (Delft: Thermal power plants, Eindhoven: 1D flame propagation, Twente: bio refinery




Solar energy


See the description of the Eindhoven course, which will be given at Twente by A. Reinders



System integration project I (group)

System integration project II (individual)


Similar description as Eindhoven



Hydrogen technology


Similar description as Eindhoven, with contributions from prof. Kuipers on integrated reactor technology


Wind energy


Similar description as Eindhoven, with contributions from prof. Hoeijmakers on CFD from wind turbines.


Institutional economics of energy


Teaching staff: Dr Maarten Arentsen (CSTM), Dr Joy Clancy (CSTM/TSD)


The following topics will be covered:

§The relevance of institutional economics for understanding the economics of electricity and gas supply/provision

§Basic economic institutional models for gas and electricity supply (from full hierarchy to full free market)

oInstitutions and transaction costs

oInstitutions and regulation

oInstitutions and the value chain of gas and electricity supply

oThe institutional featuring of the liberalized gas and electricity market (types of contracts, power exchange, hub etc.)

§Institutions and energy technology

oInstitutional organisation and type of technology

oInstitutional change and technology

oInstitutional and technological path dependency

§Standards for evaluating performance of institutional economic models (static and dynamic efficiency, technological innovation, public interest, etc)

§Sustainable energy provision

oThe challenge and the expectations

oInstitutional economics of support of renewables

§Market and non-market based support of sustainable based energy technology

oOverview of current support schemes and their (assumed) impact on technological innovation

§Tradable Green Certificates

§Feed-in systems

§Emission trading schemes

§.................


Achtergrond:

Het idee achter deze opzet is om de technisch geörienteerde studenten gevoeliger te maken voor a) het feit dat er niet zoiets als de energiemarkt bestaat, b) dat de economische organisatie en werking van de markt redelijk gecompliceerd is en c) er een duidelijke samenhang bestaat tussen de institutionele en technische organisatie van de gas en electriciteitsvoorziening.














Course descriptions of the TUD courses (Core curriculum)



Course Title:

Electrical Power Engineering

Code: ET2105

e.c.:

sem:

Lecturer(s)

dr.ir. M.J. Hoeijmakers

dr.ir. H. Polinder

prof.ir. L. van der Sluis

dr.ir. P.H. Schavemaker

Prerequisite


Objectives


Description/Contents

Electrical power conversion, magnetic circuits, transformers, Introduction to electro mechanics, power electronics and synchronous generators, Introduction to steady-state analysis of power systems, phasors, three-phase systems. Modelling power system components: transformers, transmission lines and synchronous generators. Load flow calculations for determining voltages and powers in the power system.


Teaching Methods


Course Material

Hoeijmakers, M.J. Elektrische Omzettingen (third edition), ISBN 90-407-2455-5, DUP, Delft, 2003, and Grainger, J.J. and W.D. Stevenson, Power System Analysis, ISBN 0-07-113338-0, McGraw-Hill Inc., New York, 1994.


Assessment Methods


Remarks

Relation to sustainable energy and technology: provides basic understanding of electrical power conversion and transmission.




Course Title:

Advanced Flow and Transport Phenomena

Code:

e.c.:

sem:

Lecturer(s)

prof.dr.ir. H.E.A. van den Akker


Prerequisite


Objectives


Description/Contents


Teaching Methods


Course Material


Assessment Methods


Remarks




Course Title:

Design Methodology

Code:

e.c.:

sem:

Lecturer(s)

prof. J.C. Brezet

Ir. H.L. Hellman

Ir. P. van Gennip

Prerequisite


Objectives


Description/Contents

This module focuses on the methodology of product design and innovation. Particularly, the focus will be on the integration of emerging and potentially sustainable technologies in portable products and mobility means. The lectures will be illustrated with examples from product design practice, examples from the Design for Sustainability program (DFS).

Teaching Methods


Course Material

Reader Articles

Assessment Methods


Remarks




Course Title:

Energy from biomass

Code: ??

e.c.: 4

sem: ??

Lecturer(s)

dr.ir. W. de Jong

dr.ir. J.R. van Ommen

Prerequisite


Objectives

The students will get knowledge of and insight in problems of energy supply technology based on biomass thermal conversion processes. They will be offered problems to solve in this area.

Description/Contents

An overview is given of biomass thermal conversion processes for energy (carrier) production.


Contents:

Introduction: Global warming and Biomass

Biomass Characterisation and Conversion Processes

Biomass Conversion Systems

Modelling of Biomass Conversion

Conversion of Small Particles

Combustion Process Analysis

Gasification Process Analysis

Pyrolysis Process Analysis

Emissions: NOx and tar

Couleur locale TUD: Thermal Power Plants, waste treatment

Teaching Methods

14 lectures

Course Material

Reader & handouts

Assessment Methods

written exam

Remarks






Course Title:

Solar Energy

Code:

e.c.: 4

sem:

Lecturer(s)

Dr. M. Zeman

Dr. A. Goossens

Dr. Ir. T.J. Savenije

Prof. dr. L.D.A. Siebbeles

Prerequisite

MSc students in the MSc programmes “Microelectronics and Computer Science” and “Sustainable Energy”

Objectives


Description/Contents

Solar cells: advanced semiconductor devices as a new source of energy for the 21st century, which deliver electricity directly from sunlight. The suitable semiconductor materials, device physics, and fabrication technologies for solar cells are presented. The guidelines for design of a complete solar cell system for household application are explained. The cost aspects, market development, and the application areas of solar cells are presented.


Students learn about renewable energy sources, namely the direct conversion of (solar) radiation into electricity using solar cells. Students understand the fundamental principles of the photovoltaic conversion and learn about the advantages and limitations of different solar cell technologies, such as crystalline silicon solar cell technology, thin film solar cell technologies, and novel technologies comprising organic and nanostructured materials. Students understand the specifications of solar modules and know how to design a complete solar system for a particular application.

Teaching Methods


Course Material


Assessment Methods


Remarks




Course Title:

Sustainable Hydrogen and Electrical Energy

Code:

e.c.: 2

sem:

Lecturer(s)

prof.dr. J. Schoonman

dr.ir. R. van de Krol

dr.ir. C.J. Peters

Prerequisite


Objectives


Description/Contents

In the transition to a sustainable-energy future hydrogen will most likely play an important role. To date, hydrogen is produced on an industrial scale by the steam-reforming process, followed by the water-shift reaction. To protect the environment, this process requires the capture and sequestration of carbon dioxide. A sustainable and renewable method to produce hydrogen is by splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen using solar or wind energy. Hereto, solar cells, or wind turbines can be coupled to electrolysers, but the “holy grail” of electrochemistry is the direct photo-electrolysis of water. This is a materials problem, which attracts worldwide attention. The social acceptance of hydrogen requires a cheap and safe storage of hydrogen. Several metals and metal alloys can absorb hydrogen, thus enabling a storage method that is intrinsically safe, because the absorption process is exothermic and desorption endothermic. To improve the sorption kinetics the length scale of the storage materials is reduced to the nano-scale. It has recently been shown that storage of hydrogen in gas hydrates is an attractive alternative, especially for traction applications. Although pure hydrogen hydrate is stable only at extreme conditions (2300 bar at 280 K), inclusion of minor amounts of certain molecules in the cavities of the gas hydrate structure reduces the equilibrium pressure to values below 100 bar, which makes hydrogen hydrate to an attractive medium for hydrogen storage. In this course, the basic thermodynamic, kinetic and structural features of gas hydrates will be presented, with emphasis on hydrogen hydrate as a novel storage material.

For the conversion of the energy carrier hydrogen into electrical energy fuel cells are being used. Especially, the Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) attracts widespread attention for the design of emission-free vehicles.


The students will learn about the efficient production of hydrogen using renewable energy sources, separation technologies for clean hydrogen, materials for the safe and efficient storage of hydrogen, the nano-scale approach, the integration of hydrogen into the energy supply infrastructure, the conversion of hydrogen into electrical energy using fuel cells, and the social acceptance of hydrogen as part of our future energy infrastructure.


Teaching Methods

16 oral lectures and individual reading (study load 90 hours)

Course Material


Assessment Methods

written examination

Remarks




Course Title:

Electrical Energy Storage

Code:

e.c.: 6-8 hours, working load 20 hours

sem:

Lecturer(s)

dr. e.m. Kelder

Prerequisite


Objectives


Description/Contents

Living in a 24 hours energy consuming economy requires energy delivery all day long. Hence, when considering renewable energy and its sources, which is available only at certain times, storage of (electrical) energy is a major concern. Also, the growth of the consumer market with respect to mobile appliances, makes the demand for energy storage enormously. The course will concentrate on devices that can store electricity in a chemical way – BATTERIES. The focus will however be on rechargeable systems such as Lead-acid, NiCad, Nickel Metal Hydride, and Li-ion batteries.

The course will start with thermodynamical and electrochemical considerations before zooming in into the different battery chemistries and applications.

Besides, nanomaterials going to be used in the future devices will be highlighted.


Teaching Methods


Course Material


Assessment Methods


Remarks




Course Title:

Fuel cell systems

Code: wb4425

e.c.: 2

sem:

Lecturer(s)

ir. N. Woudstra

Prerequisite

wb1126, wb1224, wb4304, wb4302

Objectives


Description/Contents

Electrochemical power production, open circuit voltage, efficiency and fuel cell voltage, the effect of pressure and gas concentration, the Nernst equation, fuel and oxidant utilization.

Fuel cell irreversibility’s, activation losses, table equation, fuel crossover and internal currents, ohmic losses, concentration losses.

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC): electrodes and electrode structure, water

management, cell cooling and air supply, considerations with regard to system design.

High temperature fuel cells, fuel reforming, fuel utilization, bottoming cycles, the use of energy and pinch technology.

Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC): molten carbonate electrolyte, cell components, stack configuration, internal reforming, performance and system layout.

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC): cell components, cell design and stack arrangement, performance and system layout.


Teaching Methods

oral

Course Material

Fuel Cell Systems Explained. James Larminie, Andrew Dicks, John Wiley & Sons, LTD, 1999,

ISBN 0-471-49026-1

References from literature:

1.Fuel Cell Handbook, Department of Energy, EG&G Services Parsons Inc.

2.Fuel Cell Systems, Edited by L.J.M.J. Blomen and M.N. Mugerwa, Plenum Press, ISBN 0-306-44158-6

Electrochemical Reactors, Their Science and Technology, Part A. Edited by M.I. Ismail. Elsevier, ISBN 0-444-87139-X

Assessment Methods


Remarks

Catalog data: Electrochemical power production, open circuit voltage and reversible voltage, efficiencies, fuel cell irreversibility’s, activation losses, table equation, ohmic losses, concentration losses, Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC), Molten Carbonate Fuel

Cell (MCFC), Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC), stack design, system layout, external and internal reforming. (see academic calendar)

Learning goals:

the course provides the student the theoretical basis for the thermodynamic evaluation of fuel cell systems

Design content: design and optimization of fuel cell stacks and system lay-out



Appendix E: Elective subjects




110201 Life-cycle strategy

110203 Product design 

114142 Transport in turbulent chemically reacting flows

114143 Gas technology

114150 Thermal Engineering - Capita Selecta 

114171 Thermal conversion of fuel, biomass and waste

114531 Life cycle orientated design

115472 Fluid mechanics of turbo machines 1

115475 Technische stromingsleer - Capita Selecta 

115771 Numerical methods in mechanical engineering 

134506 Kinetics and Catalysis

137004 Chemical Reaction Engineering

137508 Flow sheeting 

138501 Process Equipment Design

147017 Advanced Physical Fluid Dynamics

147020 Measure methods in de stromingsleer 

155010 Theory of partial differential equations

155115 Numerical techniques for partial differential equation

544090 Sustainable building 



Life-cycle strategy (110201)

Year of study

2005

Course language

English

Course description

To learn about Life Cycle Analysis and to gain experience with applying the LCA theory as an Engineer.
Key words: Life Cycle Analysis: goal definition, inventory analysis, classification, evaluation, functional unit, inventory table (extractions, emissions), environmental effects, environmental profile, reliability, validity, sensitivity, normalisation, improvement, redesign, data collection and interpretation, system boundaries, recycling, reuse, allocation (co-production), Avoided products, technology (average, marginal), representativeness (spatial, temporal), society, administration, Weighting factors, waste scenarios.
Skills: - analyse structure and life cycle product. Creating process trees, mass and energy balances, collecting and interpreting data, simulating values, coping with uncertainties and incomplete methods and theories assessing: - interaction product systems, mutual and with environment - effect of environmental interventions on environmental systems - environmental profiles in connection with options of improvement, maintaining a balance between thoroughness and progress within certain limits - consistency in overall work and sub-activities. Use of Simapro.

Objective

To gain knowledge about applying LCA theory in Engineering.

Participating progr.

(WB)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

S1



Mechanical Engineering (ME)

 

Phase 

M

Semester 

S1




Teaching methods

HC Lecture, Lectures, OPD Assignments, Assignments, PR Practical, Practical

Attendance obligation

Yes , exceptions discussed at first lecture

Assessment

Small lecture assignments, written test on LCA theory. Followed by an (individual) assignment and discussion. Final mark after the group assignments related to the overall IDM project.

Conditions for enrolment

Contact by Email, if not regular IDM/student

Prior knowledge

Desired:

 

114503 Integrated Chain Management

 

114503 Integrated chain management


Credits

5.0 EC

WTM-objective

C  Prepare ring on social functions in prof.env.

Contact person

Ir. M.E. Toxopeus

Teaching staff

ir. M.E. Toxopeus

Course material

Not known at this moment

Number of students

max. 40

Extra information

This course is part of the International Masters program: IDM, as module 1.



Product design (110203)

Year of study

2005

Course language

English

Course description

Different phases of the design process. Design methods with an overview of common design theories. Fundamental design approach using basic physics (mechanics, kinematics etc.) taking into account aspects of make ability, functionality, maintenance, environment, reliability, lifetime etc. CAD/CAE-tools for product structuring and simulation of aspects of make ability and functionality. Management of product development.

Participating progr.

(WB)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

S1



Mechanical Engineering (ME)

 

Phase 

M

Semester 

S1




Teaching methods

HC Lecture, Lectures, exercises and presentations

Attendance obligation

Yes 

Assessment

Assignments

Conditions for enrolment

via Teletop

Prior knowledge

Necessary:

 

Basic knowledge of sketching and mechanics


Credits

8.6 EC

Contact person

Ir. S.H. Visser

Teaching staff

ir. S.H. Visser, dr.ir. T.H.J. Vaneker, Ir. L van Geffen, Dr. Dipl. Ing. B Kuhlenkoetter

Course material

Lecture notes: 'Product Design'; S.H. Visser (lecture note nr. 75) web address of UT/CTW/OPM
Book: 'Product Design and Development'; Ulrich, Eppinger (ISBN: 0071232737/McGraw-Hill, 3rd edition)

Literature

Book: 'Product Design and Development'; Ulrich, Eppinger (ISBN: 0071232737/McGraw-Hill, 3rd edition



Transport in turbulent chemically reacting flows (114142)

Year of study

2005

Course language

English

Course description

Modelling of turbulent chemistry is discussed. The theory is to be applied in a CFD practical exercise. Transport of chemical species is studied in laminar and in turbulent flows. Discussed are laminar diffusion of multiple species and the modelling of turbulent effects. Calculation of chemical kinetics and equilibrium of large systems is demonstrated.

Participating progr.

(WB)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

S2



Mechanical Engineering (ME)

 

Phase 

M

Semester 

S2




Teaching methods

HC Lecture, Lectures

Assessment

assignments

Prior knowledge

Necessary:

 

114133 Thermal conversion of fuel, biomass and waste

Desired:

 

114101 Engineering Thermodynamics

 

114101 Engineering thermodynamics


Credits

3.6 EC

Contact person

dr.ir. J.B.W. Kok

Teaching staff

dr.ir. J.B.W. Kok

Course material

Collegedictaat 'Transport in turbulente stromingen met chemische reacties'



Gas technology (114143)

Year of study

2005

Course language

English

Course description

In this course the various technological processes and equipment used in the gas industry will be evaluated. Attention will be paid to the full 'gas chain', from the processing of (natural) gases, transport, storage and distribution of gas, up to the use of gas in domestic, commercial and industrial applications. In this respect, safety, security of supply, costs and environmental aspects of the gas chain will be discussed. The effects of liberalization of the gas (energy) market will be illustrated, and the newest developments in the field of gas treatment, gas infrastructure management and gas applications (erg. decentralized power production by use of micro-cogeneration) will be discussed. The future use of renewable energy sources for gas supply (erg. biogas, SNG, H2) will be illustrated as well.

GOAL: To globally assess (new) options, such as new processes, technologies, products and concepts, on its consequences for the gas business

Participating progr.

(CT)

 

Phase 

D3

Study period 

K4



(TBK)

 

Phase 

D3

Study period 

K4



(WB)

 

Phase 

D3

Study period 

K4



Mechanical Engineering (ME)

 

Phase 

M

Study period 

K4




Teaching methods

HC Lecture, Lectures, WC Seminar, Seminars

Contact hours p/w

2

Assessment

Assignment

Conditions for enrolment

Register on Teletop

Prior knowledge

Desired:

 

General Technical background


Credits

3.6 EC

Contact person

PROF.DR.IR. M. WOLTERS

Teaching staff

prof.dr.ir. M. Wolters

Course material

Lecture notes 'Gas technology'
Readers
Power Point sheets

Number of students

min. 8 - max. 30

Extra information

Please also see Teletop for additional information (Course info )



Thermal engineering - Capita Selecta (114150)

Year of study

2005

Course language

English

Course description

This course covers individual learning assignments and activities within the field of specialisation. These are not scheduled in the time tables of the courses. About the content and the study load the student requires written approval (e-mail) of the supervisor on beforehand.

Objective

to obtain knowledge in a specialized topic in thermal engineering

Participating progr.

(WB)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

-



Mechanical Engineering (ME)

 

Phase 

M

Semester 

-




Assessment

Report

Conditions for enrolment

only for students with a specialisation in Thermal Engineering

Prior knowledge

Obligatory:

 

depends on the assignment

Desired:

 

depends on the assignment


Credits

3.6 EC

Contact person

prof.dr.ir. T.H. van der Meer

Teaching staff

prof.dr.ir. T.H. van der Meer

Course material

In general these are journal articles on the specialised topic



Thermal conversion of fuel, biomass and waste (114171)

Year of study

2005

Course language

Dutch

Course description

Subjects are: properties of the different fuels, heat related calculations, the technology of combustion, gasification, pyrolysis and measuring techniques often used in the thermal engineering. Besides that attention is given to the physical properties of flames, en thermo chemical calculation for combustion, gasification and pyrolysis. Environmental and sustainable issues in the current and future energy supply are also part of the course.

GOAL: The aim of the course is to get the basic knowledge in the field of thermal conversion of fuels, waste and biomass streams.

Participating progr.

(WB)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

S1



Mechanical Engineering (ME)

 

Phase 

M

Semester 

S1




Teaching methods

HC Lecture, Lectures, PR Practical, Practical

Attendance obligation

, Y at practical

Contact hours p/w

2

Assessment

Written examination, Practical is ended with a written report

Prior knowledge

Obligatory:

 

114101 Engineering thermodynamics


Credits

5.0 EC

Contact person

ir E.A. Bramer

Teaching staff

ir. E.A. Bramer, prof.dr.ir. T.H. van der Meer, ing. J.B.M. Bossink

Course material

Handouts en sheets



Life cycle orientated design (114531)

Year of study

2005

Course language

English

Course description

Life cycle design method, short (exergetic) life cycle analysis, generating alternatives, assessment compliance (all) design requirements, reliability, sensitivity, improvement analysis.

Participating progr.

(CT)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

S1



(WB)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

S1



Mechanical Engineering (ME)

 

Phase 

M

Semester 

S1




Teaching methods

HC Lecture, Lectures + Software practical + Group assignment, PR Practical

Attendance obligation

Yes 

Conditions for enrolment


Credits

3.6 EC

Contact person

Ir. M.E. Toxopeus

Teaching staff

ir. M.E. Toxopeus, prof.dr.ir. T.H. van der Meer

Course material

Reader

Number of students

max. 40

Extra information

This course is no longer given in English. See course 110201 for replacement



Fluid mechanics of turbo machines 1 (115472)

Year of study

2005

Course language

English

Course description

An introduction to the area of rotating flow machines

GOAL: To gain knowledge of different types of turbo machines, basic analysis of the flow in the machines that perform the performance of turbo machines.

Content

Similarity considerations, velocity triangles, Euler relation, cascades, axial and radial hydraulic turbines, axial gas turbines, axial and radial pumps and fans, axial and radial compressors.

Participating progr.

(WB)

 

Phase 

D3

Study period 

K2



Mechanical Engineering (ME)

 

Phase 

M

Study period 

K2




Teaching methods

HC Lecture, Lectures, WC Seminar, Seminars

Contact hours p/w

4

Assessment

written examination

Conditions for enrolment


Prior knowledge

Obligatory:

 

Introductory courses on Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics


Prior knowledge for

Fluid mechanics of turbo machines 2 (115476)
115476 Fluid Mechanics of Turbo machines 2

Credits

5.0 EC

Inquiries

N.P. Kruyt

Contact person

N.P. Kruyt

Teaching staff

dr.ir. N.P. Kruyt

Course material

Lecture Notes "Turbo machines I"

Literature

Fluid Mechanics, Thermodynamics of Turbo machinery, S.L. Dixon

Extra information

www.ts.ctw.utwente.nl/kruyt/rs1

URL

www.ts.ctw.utwente.nl/kruyt/rs1



Technische stromingsleer - Capita Selecta (115475)

Year of study

2005

Course language

English

Course description

This course covers individual learning assignments and activities within the field of specialisation. These are not scheduled in the time tables of the courses. About the content and the study load the student requires written approval (e-mail) of the supervisor on beforehand.

Teaching methods

ZS Self-education

Conditions for enrolment


Credits

5.0 EC

Contact person

prof.dr.ir. H.W.M. Hoeijmakers



Numerical methods in mechanical engineering (115771)

Year of study

2005

Course language

English

Course description

Based on conservation laws for mass, momentum and energy, several differential equations, relevant to mechanical engineering, are derived. These are equations for a mass-spring system, the convection-diffusion equation, the wave equation, the Lap lace equation, the Poisson equation, the Helmholtz equation and the bi-harmonic equation. The equations are subdivided in hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic equations.

Thereafter, discretization methods are introduced. Spatial discretization is handled by finite difference, finite volume and finite element methods. Explicit and implicit methods are used for time discretization. The consistency, convergence and stability of the different methods will be evaluated.

For linear static applications detailed attention is given to the assembly of a set of equations, the application of boundary conditions and constraints and the efficient solution of a model, using either direct or iterative solvers, sub modelling and sub structuring. The accuracy of results will be assessed using error estimators. Plate and shell elements are introduced. Elements will be scrutinised for locking phenomena like shear, volume and membrane locking.

For dynamic analysis, own value analysis with subspace and Lanczos iterations are treated, statical reduction techniques, modal solution methods and direct time integration. For geometrically nonlinear situations incremental-iterative solution methods are introduced as the Newton-Raphson method, arc length control and line search techniques. Finally linear stability analysis is treated.

GOAL: Insight in numerical methods for solid and fluid mechanics and application in dynamical and/or nonlinear situations.

Participating progr.

(WB)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

S1



Biomedical Engineering (BME)

 

Phase 

M

Semester 

S1



Mechanical Engineering (ME)

 

Phase 

M

Semester 

S1




Teaching methods

HC Lecture, Lectures

Contact hours p/w

4

Assessment

Partial written exam, practical assignment and final verbal exam

Prior knowledge

Obligatory:

 

115413 Introduction to Fluid dynamics 115711 Mechanics of Materials 3

 

115413 Introduction to fluid dynamics

 

115711 Mechanics of materials 3

Necessary:

 

introductions to linear algebra, mechanics of materials, fluid mechanics

Desired:

 

introduction to finite element analysis


Credits

5.0 EC

Inquiries

teachers

Contact person

dr.ir. A.H. van den Boogaard

Teaching staff

dr.ir. A.H. van den Boogaard, dr.ir. V.T. Meinders, dr.ir. R. Hagmeijer

Course material

Lecture notes: Numerical Methods in Mechanical Engineering, Part I: Continuum Mechanics, Related Equations and Discretization Methods, R. Hagmeijer
Book: Concepts and Applications of Finite Element Analysis, R.D. Cook, D.S. Malkus, M.E. Plesha, R.J. Witt, 4th ed., ISBN 0-471-35605-0

Number of students

min. 10 - max. 60

URL

http://teletop.utwente.nl/04115771.nsf



Kinetics and Catalysis. (134506)

Year of study

2005

Course description

General kinetics, empirical and mechanistic aspects including the transition-state-theory, is subject of the first part of this course. In the second part, various important elements of heterogeneous catalysis are discussed, including: adsorption and desorption, catalytic reactions on solid catalysts, mass transfer, catalyst preparation and characterization. At the end of the course two cases are dealt with to apply obtained knowledge on practical situations from industry and to obtain insight in the possibilities and limitations for technical processes.

Objective

Clarify fundamental aspects of heterogeneous catalysis

Participating progr.

(TBK)

 

Phase 

D2

Study period 

K2



(CT)

 

Phase 

B2

Study period 

K2




Teaching methods

HC Lecture, Lectures and tutorials, WC Seminar

Attendance obligation

no

Assessment

During the course a test will be held. With a positive result exemption is obtained for the kinetics part of the final exam.

Credits

3.0 EC

Inquiries

Dr. B.L. Mojet

Contact person

Dr. B.L. Mojet

Teaching staff

prof.dr.ir. L. Lefferts, dr. K. Seshan, mw. dr. B.L. Mojet

Course material

Atkins'Physical Chemistry, 7e editie; Collegedictaat; transparanten en opgaven op Teletop



Chemical Reaction Engineering (137004)

Year of study

2005

Course description

I

Participating progr.

(CT)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

-



 

Phase 

B3

Semester 

-



Chemical Engineering (CHE)

 

Phase 

M

Semester 

-




Teaching methods

HC Lecture, WC Seminar

Credits

5.0 EC

Inquiries

Dr.ir. A.B.M. Heesink

Contact person

Dr.ir. A.B.M. Heesink

Teaching staff

dr.ir. A.B.M. Heesink, prof.dr.ir. G.F. Versteeg



Flow sheeting (137508)

Year of study

2005

Course description

The course deals with the principles of flow sheeting, the practical use of modern flow sheeting software and the advantages but also the limits of these programs. At the end of the course we hope that the students appreciate and are able to work with the flow sheeting tools available, but are also aware of the pitfalls linked to working with these programs. A thoughtless use of flow sheeting will eventually lead to science fiction.
The theory is elucidated in seven lectures, dealing with topics like flow sheet analysis to obtain the best calculation sequence, models of unit operations available and how they work, models to describe the thermodynamic and physical data of pure components but also of mixtures, convergence methods and accelerators, etc. Parallel to the lectures, the students learn to work with an industrial flowsheeter (HYSYS). The course is completed with a project, which is also graded, where the students have to simulate two industrial processes.

Participating progr.

(CT)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

-



Chemical Engineering (CHE)

 

Phase 

M

Semester 

-




Teaching methods

HC Lecture

Credits

3.6 EC

Inquiries

Dr.ir. A.G.J. van der Ham

Contact person

Dr.ir. A.G.J. van der Ham

Teaching staff

dr.ir. A.G.J. van der Ham

Course material

Hand-outs.

Literature

W.D. Seider e.a.; Process Design Principles: Synthesis, Analyses an Evaluation 1999



Process Equipment Design (138501)

Year of study

2005

Course description

The objective of this course is to give insight into the methodology of the design process and into the methods of process equipment design.
The contents of this course are:
1. Methodology of design;
2. Equipment selection, design and evaluation in the case of pumps, fans and compressors, heat exchangers without and with phase changes (condensors/reboilers), distillation, absorption, stripping and extraction columns.
3. Design examples and introduction to mechanical design of process equipment.
The verbal exam evaluates the design of three types of equipment considering momentum, heat, and mass transfer, respectively.

Participating progr.

(CT)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

-



(TBK)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

-



(TN)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

-



(WB)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

-



Chemical Engineering (CHE)

 

Phase 

M

Semester 

-




Teaching methods

HC Lecture

Conditions for enrolment


Prior knowledge

Necessary:

 

115421 Fluid dynamics and heat transfer

 

137020 Physical Transport Phenomena

Desired:

 

138504 Scale modification (mixing and stirring)


Credits

5.0 EC

Inquiries

Dr. N. Kuipers

Contact person

Dr. N. Kuipers

Teaching staff

dr.ir. N.J.M. Kuipers, prof.dr.ir. A.B. de Haan

Course material

Lecture notes apparaatkunde

Literature

K.K. Sinnott, Coulson & Richardson's, Chemical Engineering, vol. 6 Design, Pergamon Press, 1993;



Advanced Physical Fluid Dynamics (147017)

Year of study

2005

Course description

Navier Stokes eqs., energy eq. , potential flow, low Reynolds flow, surface waves, boundary layers, multi phase flow.

Participating progr.

(TN)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

-

4.3

 European Credits

(TW)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

-

4.3

 European Credits

(WB)

 

Phase 

D3

Semester 

-

4.3

 European Credits

Biomedical Engineering (BME)

 

Phase 

M

Semester 

-

4.3

 European Credits


Attendance obligation

N

Credits

4.3 EC

Teaching staff

ir. G.J. de Bruin, dr. R.M. van der Meer

Course material

Kundu & Cohen, Fluid Mechanics, Academic Press ISBN 0121782514



Meetmethoden in de stromingsleer (147020)

Year of study

2005

Course description

Experimental techniques in fluid dynamics. Specific advantages and limitations. Lectures, informative labtours and hands-on labtours.

Participating progr.

(TN)

 

Phase 

D3

Study period 

K3



(TW)

 

Phase 

D3

Study period 

K3



(WB)

 

Phase 

D3

Study period 

K3



(TN)

 

Phase 

M

Study period 

K3



(TW)

 

Phase 

M

Study period 

K3



(WB)

 

Phase 

M

Study period 

K3




Teaching methods

HC Lecture

Credits

3.6 EC

Teaching staff

dr. A.M. Versluis, dr. C.D. Ohl

Course material

Powerpointpresentaties van het hoorcollege beschikbaar via Teletop.



Theory of partial differential equations (155010)

Year of study

2005

Course language

English

Course description

This course on linear partial differential equations starts with the concept of characteristics for first order equations. Next the basic second order equations from Mathematical Physics are introduced: the wave equation, the heat equation and the Laplace equation. One of the questions dealt with is: what are boundary and/or initial conditions that specify uniquely a solution, and, if so, does the solution depend continuously on these data? Solutions are determined in terms of series expansions (Fourier Analysis, separation of variables) or in integral form (Green's function). Specific topics are: method of characteristics, classification of second order equations, the maximum principle, Green's functions.

Participating progr.

(TN)

 

Phase 

-

Study period 

K2



(WB)

 

Phase 

-

Study period 

K2



(TW)

 

Phase 

B3

Study period 

K2



Applied Mathematics (AM)

 

Phase 

M

Study period 

K2




Teaching methods

HC Lecture, WC Seminar

Credits

5.0 EC

Contact person

Hammer

Teaching staff

dr. M. Hammer

Course material

Peter V. O'Neil: Beginning Partial Differential Equations, 1999, John Wiley.

Extra information

only in quartile 2!

URL

http://wwwhome.math.utwente.nl/~hammerm/Teaching/PDE



Partial diff. equations: numerical solution I (155015)

Year of study

2003

Course language

English

Course description

Accuracy and stability of numerical approximations: 2 weeks. Analytical properties and numerical discretization of conservation laws: 2 weeks. Parabolic equations: Fourier analysis, explicit method: 1 week. Implicit method, Thomas algorithm, three-level scheme: 1 week. More general boundary conditions, conservation; general problems: 1 week. More dimensions, ADI: 1 week.

Participating progr.

(TW)

 

Phase 

D3

Trimester 

2



(WB)

 

Phase 

D3

Trimester 

2



(TW)

 

Phase 

B3

Trimester 

2



 

Phase 

M

Trimester 

2




Main subject area

Fysisch-Technische Stroom

Teaching methods

HC Lecture, PR Practical

Credits

4.3 EC

Contact person

Van der Vegt

Teaching staff

dr.ir. O. Bokhove

Course material

K.W. Morton and D.F. Mayers, Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations. Cambridge University Press 1998.


Sustainable building (544090)

Year of study

2005

Course language

Dutch

Course description

not available

Participating progr.

STUDIERICHTING CIVIELE TECHNOLOGIE en MANAGEMENT (CIT)

 

Phase 

D

Study period 

K4

7.5

 European Credits

Civil Engineering & Management (CEM)

 

Phase 

M

Study period 

K4

7.5

 European Credits


Teaching methods

HC Lecture, OPD Assignments, PJ Project, PRS Presentation, ZS Self-education

Credits

7.5 EC

Teaching staff

dr.ir. H.J.H. Brouwers, prof.ir. D.G. Mans, ing. G.H. Snellink, ir. A.G. Entrop

Appendix f: Graduation projects.

Graduation subjects at Twente University


At Twente University the following five area’s are defined in which students can choose a graduation assignment.


Thermal conversion of biomass

This is a main line of research in Mechanical as well as Chemical Engineering, with a large number of PhD’s (10) and post docs (3). A large number of graduation projects can be defined in the framework of the ongoing research projects on combustion, gasification, pyrolysis and applications of bio-oil..


Conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals (bio-refinery)

In this emerging research field a number of research groups in Chemical and Mechanical Engineering are starting to be active. It is a main research topic in the research group on separation technology (prof. De Haan), with contributions from different other research groups.


Membrane-based energy production

This concerns research in the groups Membrane technology (prof. Wessling) and Inorganic Materials Science (prof. Blank) on subjects like polymer fuel cells on the basis of hydrogen and methanol, materials for solid oxide fuel cells, biological fuel cells, pressure retarded osmosis and reversed electro-dialysis.


Integrated reactor technology

The main research group in this field is the group “Fundamentals of Chemical Reaction Engineering” (prof. Kuipers) The research is related to development, modeling and evaluation of integrated (multi-phase-) reactor technology for the efficient large scale production of energy carriers.


Use of sustainable energy in consumer products and in buildings

It concerns activities at Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Design in the area of the use of sustainable energy and sustainable materials in the building environment, and the integration of solar cells and fuel cells in consumer products.


Next to these five main area’s students assignments can be defined on subjects like:

Hydro-power (prof. Hulscher), synthetic materials for turbine blades (prof. Akkerman), gas technology (prof. Wolters), Computational Fluid Dynamics for flow around turbine blades (prof. Hoeijmakers)




Appendix G: Short CV’s of teaching staff


University of Twente


C.V. Angèle Reinders


Personal details


Surname: Reinders

First name: Angèle

First names in full: Angelina Hubertina Mechtildus Elisabeth

Title: Ph.D.

Date of birth: July 5, 1969

Place of birth: Voorburg, The Netherlands


Contact address: Department of Design, Production and Management

Faculty of CTW

University of Twente

P.O.Box 217

NL-7500 AE Enschede

The Netherlands


E-mail: a.h.m.e.reinders@utwente.nl

Phone: +int (0)53 489 3681 / 2520

Fax: +int (0)53 489 3631



Educational background


1993-1999

Ph.D. Thesis entitled ‘Performance Analysis of Photovoltaic Solar Energy Systems’, Dept. of Science, Technology and Society, Faculty of Chemistry, Utrecht University, Utrecht.

1988-1993

M.Sc. in Experimental Physics, specialization in Material Physics and Energy Physics, Utrecht University, Utrecht.

1987-1988

Amsterdam Academy of Arts (not completed), Amsterdam.

1981-1987

Maurick College, Vught.




Professional experience


2002-now

Assistant Professor at the Dept. of Design, Production and Management, Fac. of CTW

University of Twente, Enschede.

Innovative product design based on emerging energy technologies

2001

Assistant Professor at the Dept. of Design and Manufacturing Technology, Fac. of Design, Engineering and Production, Delft University of Technology, Delft.

Portable energy systems for consumer products.

2000

Management assistant at Asia Alternative Energy Unit – ASTAE, The World Bank, Washington D.C., USA.

Rural energy and poverty alleviation, EnPoGen project.

1999

Researcher at the Dept. of Science, Technology and Society, Fac. of Chemistry, Utrecht University, Utrecht.

Life style and energy consumption of households in the EU.

LCA of rural electrification systems.

1994-1998

Ph.D. researcher at the Dept. of Science, Technology and Society, Fac. of Chemistry, Utrecht University, Utrecht.

Member of Novem national working group ‘PV monitoring’ (1994-1998).

Guest scientist in the 2000 roofs program of Fraunhofer Institute of Solar Energy Systems, Freiburg i.B., Germany (1994, 1995 and 1998).


Guest scientist of the Sukatani Solar Home System Project, Ministry of Implementation of Technology, Jakarta, Indonesia (1997).





Curriculum Vitae Rianne de Leeuw



Personal Information


Name:

G.J. de Leeuw (Rianne)



Date of birth:

August 11th, 1977



Nationality:

Dutch



Address:

Jacob Marisstraat 63

8932 KD Leeuwarden

the Netherlands



Telephone:

058-8441223



E-mail:

G.J.deLeeuw@Cartesius.utwente.nl


Current Profession


Present

Business director at the Cartesius Institute of the University of Twente. Main areas of activity are management of the international education of the institute (the main one being the Master of Business Administration; Environmental and Energy Management), teaching in this Master course, preparing and supervising case studies and graduation projects, executing (applied) projects in the field of education and environmental management and managing the organisational and budgeting aspects of the institute.




Education


1995 - 2000

MSc in Environmental Economics at Wageningen University with the specialisations Environmental Management and General Environmental Economics. Graduated with distinction.



Sept. 1997 – dec. 1997

Study at Michigan State University, USA.



Relevant activities and courses


Present

Committee member of the music association ‘Malletband Druma Leeuwarden’, an enthusiastic group of 20 amateur musicians.



June 2001

Three day course ‘Writing and Presenting Scientific Papers’ at the University of Amsterdam, lectured by M. Grossman.



Sept. – Dec. 1998

May – July 1997 May – July 1998

Student-assistant at the Department of Business Economics of Wageningen University, preparing lecture materials and exercises and compiling a reader, and preparing and supervising a business economics computer practical on financial calculations.







CV of dr. M.J. Arentsen


Maarten J. Arentsen (1954) holds a Master’s degree in political science (specialization in research methodology and political modernization) from Nijmegen University and a PhD (Public Administration) from the University of Twente. In 1985 he joined the Policy Science section of the Faculty of Public Administration and Public Policy at the University of Twente and specialized in policy evaluation research. From 1985 to 1991 he conducted several policy impact evaluations, including one on the impact of the Dutch Chemical Substances Act on R&D in the chemical industry and on the impact of environmental regulation on the environmental strategies of industrial corporations. In 1988 he was one of the founding members of CSTM and became one of the senior research associates of the institute. In 1991 he chaired the energy section of CSTM and now develops, conducts, supervises and coordinates research projects on energy policy, energy market reform and (green) energy innovation, with a special focus on technological and institutional change. In 1995 he became vice-director of CSTM. He publishes in (inter)national books and journals and occasionally teaches in undergraduate and postgraduate teaching programmes.


………………………………………………………


CV of Prof.dr.ir. J.A.M. Kuipers

______________________________



Prof.dr.ir J.A.M. Kuipers is full-time professor of Fundamentals of Chemical Reaction Engineering at the Department of Chemical Engineering of Twente University and heads a research group which focuses on fundamental aspects of the discipline of Chemical Reaction Engineering. In the Chemical Engineering department he teaches introductory and advanced courses on Physical Transport Phenomena, Chemical Reaction Engineering, Numerical Methods for Chemical Engineers and Computational Fluid Dynamics for Chemical Engineers. He received his Ph.D. degree (1990) from the former Technical University of Twente with Prof. W.P.M. van Swaaij as promotor. The topic of his Ph.D. work was first principles modelling of dense gas-fluidized beds. He is a member of the editorial board of Powder Technology, the international advisory panel of Chemical Engineering Science and the international advisory board of China Particuology.


The main research interest is the quantitative description of transport phenomena (including fluid flow) and interplay with chemical transformations in multiphase chemical reactors. The generation of new knowledge and development of new reactor models with improved predictive capability for this industrially important class of chemical reactors constitutes an important goal of the research activities. The main research topics of his group can be divided into the following three areas:


1. Multiphase Reactors

2. Advanced Experimental Techniques

3. Novel Reactors


He has published over 150 papers in various international journals. His research group Fundamentals of Chemical Reaction Engineering participates in the OSPT (Dutch research school for process technology) and the J.M. Burgerscentrum (Dutch research school for fluid mechanics). The group has accumulated considerable experience (15 years) in modelling gas-solid and gas-liquid flows using “in house” developed Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models (Euler-Euler, Euler-Lagrange, Volume Tracking and Front Tracking). The availability of these types of models, both in 2D and 3D, offers the possibility to study the hydrodynamics of multiphase reactors in great depth. Currently Ph.D. projects are sponsored by a number of multinationals as well as the Dutch Science Foundation.


The areas of expertise of Prof. J.A.M. Kuipers include:


1. Physical Transport Phenomena

2. Mathematical Modelling

3. Multiphase Chemical Reactors




Curriculum vitae Th.H. van der Meer




Prof.dr.ir. Th. H. van der Meer

Twente University

Mechanical Engineering

Thermal Engineering


Date and place of birth: 13 June 1951 in Zoetermeer



1970 – 1976

Study at Delft University of Technology, faculty of Applied Physics.


Juni 1976

Graduated in Applied Physics, section Heat Transfer


1976 – 1990

Lecturer at the faculty of Applied Physics of Delft University of Technology.


Sept. 1987

PhD degree in Applied Physics obtained at Delft University of Technology on the “Heat Transfer from Impinging Flame Jets”


Nov. 1987 – Aug. 1988

Post doctoral fellow at the University of Waterloo (Canada)


1990 – 1999

Associate professor at Delft University of Technology, fac. of Applied Physics, section Thermal and Fluids Sciences (former Heat Transfer Section)


1999 - present

Professor in Thermal Engineering at Twente University, Head of the Section Thermal Engineering of the faculty of Mechanical Engineering.



1.Committees and representations:


President of the section Energy and Heat Technology of the Royal Institute for Engineers

President of the Dutch section of the Combustion Institute

Member of the Eurotherm Committee

Member of the Assembly of International Heat Transfer Conferences

Member of the Scientific Council of the International Centre for Heat and Mass Transfer


Member of the scientific committee of ECOS2000, Utwente, 2000

Co-chairman of RAN2001, Nagoya, 15-17 December 2001

Co-chairman of the Eurotherm seminar 74: “Heat transfer in unsteady and transitional flows”, Eindhoven, 24-26 March, 2003

Member of the Programme Committee of the European Combustion Meeting, ECM2003, Orleans, 2003

Member of the Scientific Committee of the Fourth Thermal Sciences Conference, Birmingham, March 2004

Chairman of the Workshop on Synthesis gas production from Hysrocarbon Fuel, July 2004, Utwente

Member of the Scientific Committee of the 6th Sixth World Conference on Experimental Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics (ExHFT-6), Matsushima, Japan, April 17-21, 2005




Curricula Vitae TUDelft


Nico Woudstra

Nico Woudstra is associated with the section Energy Technology at the

faculty of Mechanical Engineering of the Delft University of Technology (TU

Delft) since 1991. Within this section he is responsible for the evaluation of

advanced energy systems, like gasification combined cycle and fuel cell

systems. He is lecturing fundamentals of thermodynamics, thermodynamics

for energy systems and fuel cell systems at the faculty of Mechanical

Engineering.

Before 1991 he has been involved in the evaluation of various types of

energy conversion systems in industry (Verolme Shipyards, Neratoom) as

well as research organizations (TNO). These activities included subjects with

regard to ship propulsion systems, nuclear power systems and advanced

fossil fuel fired systems for power generation and CHP.

Since 1983 he is responsible for the development of the computer program

Cycle-Tempo, a programme for the evaluation and optimization of conventional

and advanced energy systems. Major developments did include the modelling

of gasification and fuel cell systems, facilities for the analysis and

optimization of energy systems such as the calculation of exergy values and

efficiencies a routine for multi-parameter optimization and the presentation

of processes in property- and value-diagrams.

He has managed and coordinated a variety of system studies like the

feasibility of potassium topping cycles, systems based on renewable energy,

HT fuel cell systems (MCFC and SOFC), integrated gasification combined

cycle systems and combined heat and power systems. Recent research

activities are concentrating on biomass gasification fuel cell systems with and

without hydrogen as a secondary fuel.






















Dr.ir. W. de Jong (Wiebren) assistant professor


Technische Universiteit Delft

Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering

Process and Energy department, section Energy Technology

Mekelweg 2

2628 CD Delft, The Netherlands


Phone: +31 15 2789476

Fax: +31 15 2782460


Email: w.dejong@3mE.tudelft.nl

Biography


Wiebren de Jong is assistant professor within the section Energy Technology of the Process & Energy department, faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering (3mE), TU Delft. He is active in bioenergy research since 1996. He studied chemical engineering at the University of Twente and obtained his Mc degree in 1991. After that, he carried out a post-graduate study in the field of process design and obtained his degree (PD Eng) from this education in 1994. From 1994 till 1996 he was involved as post-graduate exchange student in an EU project in the framework of the Human Capital and Mobility Programme Refrigeration a Sorption (HCMCHRX-CT93-0391) in the field of modelling and experimentally testing environmentally acceptable cooling machines. After that he became PhD student at the section Energy Technology in the field of modelling and experimentally validating the fate of fuel bound nitrogen in pressurised fluidised bed gasification processes. He got his PhD degree in February 2005. He was involved as researcher and co-supervising specialist in several EU FP3, 5 and 6 projects in the laboratory of the section and projects in the framework of the Dutch Governmental Agency for Energy and Environment (SenterNOVEM). These projects, mostly experimentally oriented on a pilot scale, concerned biomass combustion and gasification, as well as combustion of biomass derived low calorific value fuel gas.


Education


WB 4405 Fuel Conversion (TU Delft)

WB 4429-03 Thermodynamics of Mixtures (TU Delft)

WB 4435-05 Equipment for heat transfer (TU Delft)

IE 3320 Introduction to Renewable Energy Systems (TU Delft)


Recent journal publications


2005

Glazer, M.P., Khan, N.A., Schürmann, H., Monkhouse P., de Jong, W. and Spliethoff, H. (2005) Alkali Metals in Circulating Fluidized Bed - Measurements and Chemical Equilibrium Analysis, accepted for publication in Energy and Fuels


2004

Heikkinen, J.M., Hordijk, J.C., de Jong, W. and Spliethoff, H. (2004) “Thermogravimetry as a tool to classify waste components to be used for energy generation”, J. Anal. Appl. Pyrolysis, 71, pp. 883-900.


2003

De Jong , W., Pirone, A., Wójtowicz, M.A. (2003) “Pyrolysis of Miscanthus Giganteus and wood pellets: TG-FTIR analysis and reaction kinetics”, Fuel, 82(9), pp. 1139-1147.


De Jong, W., Ünal. Ö., Andries, J., Hein, K.R.G. and Spliethoff, H. (2003) “Biomass and fossil fuel conversion by pressurised fluidised bed gasification using hot gas ceramic filters as gas cleaning”, Biomass & Bioenergy, 25(1), pp. 59-83.


De Jong, W., Ünal. Ö., Andries, J., Hein, K.R.G. and Spliethoff, H. (2003) “Thermochemical conversion of brown coal and biomass in a pressurised fluidised bed gasifier with hot gas filtration using ceramic channel filters, measurements and gasifier modelling”, Applied Energy, 74(3-4), pp. 425-437.





Prof. dr. Laurens D.A. Siebbeles


Laurens Siebbeles (1963) is a professor in opto-electronic materials at the Delft University of Technology. He studied physical and theoretical chemistry at the Free University in Amsterdam. As a PhD student in the FOM institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics in Amsterdam he investigated photodissocation dynamics of small molecules. He was a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Paris Sud in France, where he studied the dynamics of photo-excited molecules. Since 1994 he works at the Delft University of Technology. His research group studies the nature and dynamics of charge carriers and excitons in molecular materials with potential opto-electronic applications. Charge carriers and excitons are produced using high-energy electron or laser pulses and are probed using time-resolved optical detection and microwave or terahertz measurements. The experimental studies are supported by quantum chemical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations of charge and exciton dynamics.


Curriculum vitae of prof. dr. Laurens D.A. Siebbeles

Personal details

Title(s), initial(s), first name, surname: Prof. dr., L.D.A., Laurens, Siebbeles

Gender: male

Date and place of birth: Amsterdam, 12 February 1963

Nationality: Dutch

Webpage: www.dct.tudelft.nl/om/


Master's degree

University: Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Date: 18 December 1986

Main subject: Physical Chemistry


Doctorate

Institute/University: FOM-institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics /

graduation at University of Amsterdam

Date: 19 September 1991

Supervisor (‘Promotor’): Prof. dr. J. Los

Title of thesis: Anisotropy in the photodissociation of H2:

a subtle probe of resonances


Work experience since graduating

11/91 - 02/94 Postdoc

Laboratoire pour l’Utilisation du Rayonnement Electromagnétique,

Université de Paris Sud, Orsay, France

(experiments and quantum theory on molecular photodissociation)


02/94 - 08/94 Postdoc

FOM-institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

(quantum theory of rotation and photon emission during fragmentation of a

molecule)


09/94 - present Staff member at the Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands

Current position: head of Section Opto-Electronic Materials (10-15 academic and 6 support staff members)

Research area: experiments and theory on (ultrafast) dynamics of excited states and charge carriers in functional materials such as semiconducting polymers, self-assembling organic (bio)molecules, inorganic nanoparticles




Dr.ir. J.R. van Ommen (Ruud), assistant professor

TU Delft – Faculty of Applied Sciences

DelftChemTech
Product & Process Engineering
Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft
Room: Proeffabriek (1.030)
Tel: +31 (0)15-2782133
Fax: +31 (0)15 2788267

E-mail: J.R.vanOmmen@tnw.tudelft.nl



Biography


Since 2001, Ruud van Ommen is working as an assistant professor in Multiphase Reactor Engineering the DelftChemTech department at Delft University of Technology. He obtained an MSc in chemical engineering at Delft University in 1996. In 2001 he obtained his PhD at Delft University; his thesis was titled “Monitoring Fluidized Bed Hydrodynamics”. An important part of this work was focussed on early detection of agglomeration in biomass-fired fluidized beds.


His current research interests are the early detection and prevention of undesired events in multiphase reactors, improving the performance of multiphase reactors by utilizing and introducing dynamic structure, and the scale-up of production of nanostructured materials. In 2004, Ruud obtained the didactic qualification for university teachers. From April 2004 to February 2005, he was staying as a visiting researcher at Chalmers University of Technology (Gothenburg, Sweden), focusing on computational fluid dynamics of gas-solid flows. In 2005, he received a Veni grant from NWO for research on tailoring particle mixtures for fluidized bed reactors with the aid of high-throughput experimentation. Ruud is a board member of the NPT (“Nederlandse ProcesTechnologen”).


Courses

ST2242 Catalysis and Reactor Engineering (CaRE)

CH3061 Multiphase Reactor Engineering (MuRE)

CH3281 Matlab for Chemical Engineers (MaCE)



Recent journal publications


Kleijn van Willigen, F., van Ommen, J.R., van Turnhout, J., van den Bleek, C.M., ‘Bubble size reduction in electric-field-enhanced fluidized beds’, J. Electrostatics, 63, pp. 943-948, 2005.

Stienstra G.J., Nijenhuis J., Kroezen, T., van den Bleek, C.M., van Ommen, J.R., ‘Monitoring slurry-loop reactors for early detection of hydrodynamic instabilities’, Chem. Eng. Proc., 44, pp. 959-968, 2005.

van Ommen, J.R., van der Schaaf, J., Schouten, J.C., van Wachem, B.G.M., Coppens, M.-O., van den Bleek, C.M., ‘Optimal placement of probes for dynamic pressure measurements in large-scale fluidized beds’, Powder Technology, 139, pp. 264-276, 2004.

Coppens, M.-O., van Ommen, J.R., ‘Structuring chaotic fluidized beds’, Chemical Engineering Journal, 96, pp. 117-124, 2003.

Villa, J., van Ommen, J.R., van den Bleek, C.M., ‘Early detection of foam formation in bubble columns by attractor comparison’, AIChE Journal, 49, pp. 2442-2444, 2003.

Gheorghiu, S., van Ommen, J. R., Coppens, M.-O. , ‘Power-law distribution of pressure fluctuations in multiphase flow’, Physical Review E, 67, art. no. 041305, 2003.

van Ommen, J.R., Coppens, M.‑O., van den Bleek, C.M., Schouten, J.C., ‘Early warning of agglomeration in fluidized beds by attractor comparison’, AIChE Journal, 46, pp. 2183‑2197, 2000.


Biographical notes Professor Harry E.A. Van den Akker


Professor Harry E.A. Van den Akker earned his MSc and PhD degrees at Eindhoven University of Technology, with Professor Kees Rietema, in 1974 and 1978, respectively. In 1977, he started at the ‘Koninklijke/Shell Laboratorium, Amsterdam’ (KSLA) as a research engineer. He spent a year (1984/85) at Shell’s Westhollow Research Center in Houston (TX, USA). He was appointed Full Professor and Director of the ‘Kramers Laboratorium voor Fysische Technologie’ of Delft University of Technology, in 1988. His expertise is in the fields of Transport Phenomena, Fluid Mechanics of Process Equipment, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Multiphase Flow, and Chemical Engineering. He was also a visiting professor at King’s College (London University, UK). So far, some 25 PhD students earned their PhD degree with him, among whom 3 with honours.


In 2002, he was appointed Chairman of the Department of Multi-Scale Physics (MSP) of the Delft Faculty of Applied Sciences (TNW). Since 2001, he is serving as the Scientific Director of the Netherlands Research School in Process Technology (OSPT). Also since 2001, Van den Akker has been the President elect of the Dutch Physical Society (NNV).


Teaching courses such as Transport Phenomena, Advanced Transport Phenomena, Computational Fluid Dynamics and Physics of Process Equipment.