DAY 2 OF THE RISK & RESILIENCE ONLINE EVENT

AFTER THE CRISIS: IMPLICATIONS FOR RISK & RESILIENCE IN the industry & construction

To what extent can Dutch manufacturing sectors absorb the impact of a crisis and turn it into an opportunity?

On the second day of Risk & Resilience Online, we will zoom in on the implications for managing risk and organising resilience in the various sectors of Dutch society. One of these sessions is on ‘Industry & Construction’. The coronavirus has caused a lot of uncertainty and put these large Dutch manufacturing sectors on edge. What issues are the construction and industry sectors facing? Are we consciously resilient or is this crisis just happening to us? And what is our vision for the future?

The effects of the coronavirus crisis vary, not only by sector but also between and within organisations. Players are differentiated by their perspectives, the challenges they face and the degree of urgency within the organisation. What’s more, there is a parallel social interest that is screaming for our attention. After all, the crisis not only affects organisations; it also has an unmistakable impact on society as a whole. This calls for adaptation and creativity, which are well-established strengths of the manufacturing sectors.

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Speaker
Jan van Rooijen

Jan studied business economics and tax economics at the EUR followed by a postdoc Accountancy/RA at the UvA. He completed his PhD research at the Tinbergen Institute. In 1999, together with a partner, he founded the successful company MarketXS. In 2008 Jan became CFO of fibreglass company Reggefiber of the Wessels family and in 2013 he was appointed CFO of VolkerWessels.

Prof. dr. ir. Joop Halman

Johannes (Joop) I.M. Halman is an emeritus Professor in Innovation and Risk Management at the University of Twente. He also holds an endowed Schlumberger chair in Technology and sustainable development at the University of Curaçao. During 2001 he was a Visiting Research Professor at University of Washington in Seattle and from 2006-2011 a visiting professor at the University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Economics, Slovenia.

Joop Halman earned an MSc in Construction Engineering from Delft University of Technology, an MSc in business studies from Rotterdam School of Management at Erasmus University and a PhD in Technology Management from Eindhoven University of Technology. He has advised international firms like Philips Electronics, Unilever and Shaanxi in China on the world wide application of risk management strategies within their innovation processes. He has also advised the government of Curaçao in defining an innovation policy for the island of Curaçao.

Prior to his academic career, Halman worked for several years in practice. As a project manager and senior management consultant he has initiated and conducted several construction, (re) organization and innovation projects. Joop Halman is also involved as a chairman of the Board of Intent (a Foundation promoting research and education in the field of Technology Entrepreneurship and Innovation processes), member of the scientific committee of PRIMO (Public Risk Management Organization) and Chairman of the Palm Music Foundation.

Halman has published about 175 scientific articles, mostly in international refereed scientific journals, supervised 20 PhD projects and supervised more than 225 MSC thesis projects.

Jannes Slomp

As a professor at the HAN University of Applied Sciences, I work with students, companies and researchers. A significant part of the collaboration is now conducted using MS Teams. We have discovered new opportunities and are now giving e-masterclasses and e-workshops, which has enlarged our network and made it possible for new collaborations to emerge. But we are also missing something. Information gets lost more quickly, and we are missing out on the eye contact, movement and energy that come with large meetings. It is important for us to learn what the balance will be after the coronavirus crisis is over.

Jeroen Schütz

Jeroen is since 2016 the Global Head of Personnel Security within the Corporate Security department in Royal Philips. His responsibilities cover: Crisis Management, Security Analysis, Personnel Security Response, Special Assignments, Executive Protection and Global Event Security. In a second role, Jeroen is the Chairman of the Group Crisis Operations Team within Philips. He is a former Royal Netherlands Marine Corps officer and Commando operative. He worked as a consultant in a renowned business risk consultancy, and he operated as a close protection team-leader and security advisor to diplomatic missions in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Bosnia. He has been director and owner of a private security company, which has executed numerous business intelligence and security risk management projects in high-risk environments in Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Jeroen holds a Master of Arts degree in Intelligence and Security.

We would like to invite you to join three renowned organisations to exchange experiences, so we can sketch a vision for the future and thereby also create good prospects for the Dutch construction and industry sector. 

During an interactive session, we will go into this in more detail and discuss the following questions:

  • To what extent was your organisation prepared for a crisis such as the one we are now experiencing?
  • How did your organisation and similar businesses deal with the situation that arose? What went well, what could be improved, what can no longer be done and what can be added?
  • What opportunities and possibilities have your organisation and similar businesses created during the coronavirus crisis?
  • What lessons can be learned from crisis management during this crisis?
  • And finally... how can organisations improve their resilience in a changing context?

The webinar is supervised by a team of professionals, with the aim of entering into a dialogue on this subject together. This is a place to reflect on the knowledge gained, analyse it and transform it into opportunities for shared success and a more resilient sector!

  • Jan van Rooijen - CFO, VolkerWessels

    VolkerWessels is a leading international construction company that works according to the 'think global, act local' principle. A decentralized organization where companies, within frameworks, can take operational decisions as independently as possible and are responsible. This is also very important in our sector in order to be able to respond decisively to a crisis such as COVID-19. As a result, challenges on projects can be solved quickly and alternative working methods such as the construction protocol Samen Veilig Doorwerken (Working Together Safely) and working from home can be applied quickly and adequately. If projects can be built less efficiently, a low-margin business can quickly go in the wrong direction.

    Numerous measures have also been taken centrally and a number of scenarios have been made VolkerWessels about the possible impact of COVID-19 on the company. These measures and scenarios were then discussed with stakeholders such as management, supervisory directors and divisional boards. Based on this, a large number of measures were implemented at an early stage. Jan van Rooijen will elaborate on this in more detail.

    Bio:
    Jan studied business economics and tax economics at the EUR followed by a postdoc Accountancy/RA at the UvA. He completed his PhD research at the Tinbergen Institute. In 1999, together with a partner, he founded the successful company MarketXS. In 2008 Jan became CFO of fibreglass company Reggefiber of the Wessels family and in 2013 he was appointed CFO of VolkerWessels.

  • Prof. dr. ir. Joop Halman - Emeritus Professor Innovation & Risk Management

    Johannes (Joop) I.M. Halman is an emeritus Professor in Innovation and Risk Management at the University of Twente. He also holds an endowed Schlumberger chair in Technology and sustainable development at the University of Curaçao. During 2001 he was a Visiting Research Professor at University of Washington in Seattle and from 2006-2011 a visiting professor at the University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Economics, Slovenia.

    Joop Halman earned an MSc in Construction Engineering from Delft University of Technology, an MSc in business studies from Rotterdam School of Management at Erasmus University and a PhD in Technology Management from Eindhoven University of Technology. He has advised international firms like Philips Electronics, Unilever and Shaanxi in China on the world wide application of risk management strategies within their innovation processes. He has also advised the government of Curaçao in defining an innovation policy for the island of Curaçao.

    Prior to his academic career, Halman worked for several years in practice. As a project manager and senior management consultant he has initiated and conducted several construction, (re) organization and innovation projects. Joop Halman is also involved as a chairman of the Board of Intent (a Foundation promoting research and education in the field of Technology Entrepreneurship and Innovation processes), member of the scientific committee of PRIMO (Public Risk Management Organization) and Chairman of the Palm Music Foundation.

    Halman has published about 175 scientific articles, mostly in international refereed scientific journals, supervised 20 PhD projects and supervised more than 225 MSC thesis projects.

    For his achievements in science and the conservation of the musical heritage of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Halman received in 2016 a knighthood in the order of Orange-Nassau. In 2018 the Risk Management Society in The Netherlands granted him the Risk Oeuvre Award.

    Key qualifications:
    Research and lecturing in the area’s of:

    • Management of uncertainty and risk

    • Management of technological and innovation processes

    • Product platform and product family creation

    • Program and project management

    • Design strategies and design management

  • Martijn van Haaf - Operational Director Auping

    Responsible for production, logistics and purchasing since 2018.

  • Jeroen Schütz - Global Head of Personnel Security, Philips

    The COVID-19 pandemic has led to corporate crises that were unprecedented in the last decennia. The potential impact of this crisis is specifically damaging for all commercial organizations, regardless of size, age and resources. For a multinational company as Philips, a truly global pandemic requires a top-down, corporate-led crisis management organization. Pandemics can be expected and crisis scenarios can be developed, but the potential and actual threats to the company were hard to foresee. So how can a multinational organization effectively prepare for such a global crisis? And what is the formula for being resilient in such unchartered territory?  

    Bio:
    Jeroen is since 2016 the Global Head of Personnel Security within the Corporate Security department in Royal Philips. His responsibilities cover: Crisis Management, Security Analysis, Personnel Security Response, Special Assignments, Executive Protection and Global Event Security. In a second role, Jeroen is the Chairman of the Group Crisis Operations Team within Philips. He is a former Royal Netherlands Marine Corps officer and Commando operative. He worked as a consultant in a renowned business risk consultancy, and he operated as a close protection team-leader and security advisor to diplomatic missions in Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Bosnia. He has been director and owner of a private security company, which has executed numerous business intelligence and security risk management projects in high-risk environments in Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Jeroen holds a Master of Arts degree in Intelligence and Security.

  • Stef Hoffman - Global CISO at Philips

    The current crisis has clearly demonstrated a number of things:

    1. We have only limited learning capacity
      After SARS was made known to the world, the SARS virus was found in Europe within 24 hours – an unprecedentedly rapid spread. This knowledge seems to have contributed little or nothing to the early implementation of sufficient measures in relation to Covid-19.
    2. Risk management is still insufficiently thorough
      When the virus 'exploded' in Wuhan and the first statistical information became available, we ignored the facts and failed to sufficiently prepare ourselves for the inevitable; we thus missed the opportunity for pro-active risk mitigation. Accepting the 'inevitable & unimaginable' seems to be a difficult task.
    3. Despite the limited preparation, we ultimately had sufficient resilience to take the necessary measures quickly when it was really necessary.

    The question remains: What would the statistics have looked like if we had taken the necessary measures in time.....?

    Bio:

    • Global CISO at Philips
    • Prior to joining Philips as Global CISO
    • >30 years in IT service industry in various roles: IT consulting, commercial, delivery & managerial
    • Holds Master in Risk Management
    • >15 years in combined management role: Risk, Compliance, Security, Privacy, Crisis and Business Continuity at all organisational levels
    • Married, 2 children & 5 grandchildren
  • Jannes Slomp - Full Time Professor World Class Performance at the HAN University of Applied Sciences and director of the HAN Lean-QRM Center

    Impact of the coronavirus crisis on my work.

    As a professor at the HAN University of Applied Sciences, I work with students, companies and researchers. A significant part of the collaboration is now conducted using MS Teams. We have discovered new opportunities and are now giving e-masterclasses and e-workshops, which has enlarged our network and made it possible for new collaborations to emerge. But we are also missing something. Information gets lost more quickly, and we are missing out on the eye contact, movement and energy that come with large meetings. It is important for us to learn what the balance will be after the coronavirus crisis is over.

    Bio:

    Jannes Slomp is a full-time Professor of World Class Performance at the HAN University of Applied Sciences and director of the HAN Lean-QRM Centre. His interests concern lean and quick response manufacturing, automated and digital technologies, and lean product development. In his current position, he is responsible for setting up and running innovative research projects, together with industrial partners.

  • Jan Pieter van Dalen - Owner | Senior consultant | Trainer & Coach at Bouw Beter

    The current crisis is leading to a lot of unrest. Now, more than ever, the construction sector needs calm heads and a clear overview of the situation. Consumers must be able to rely on the construction industry. With the arrival of the Construction Quality Assurance Act on 1 January 2022, risks and uncertainty will be better controlled through the mandatory introduction of risk assessments at the project level – a welcome necessity in our increasingly complicated reality. It is important to identify early on where things can go wrong, and to keep a good eye on building performance. The construction sector is vital to the economy, and especially now that Covid-19 is causing many sectors to shrink drastically, construction can be the backbone of the economy.

    Bio:

    I really want to make the construction sector better! And we can: by tackling challenges using knowledge and experience, working together to achieve your goals and fulfil all our agreements, and training professionals in the industry. With a focus on quality assurance, risk management, construction process management, building physics and sustainability, I work at the intersection of education, research and business.

  • Hans Berkien - Adviser Compliance At Van Hattum & Blankevoort

    The impact the coronavirus crisis has had on me has been limited, as the essential aspects of my work haven’t changed; in some areas I am now even more efficient, for instance due to reduced travel time. The area where I’ve seen the biggest effects is that of relationships and their associated risks. As a result, I have become even more aware of the impact that is having on the people around me and on their behaviour in terms of the measures being taken. I’m trying to strengthen my resilience by focusing extra hard on my health.

    The impact on the company (civil concrete construction) has also been relatively limited, with nitrogen and PFAS [man-made chemicals that contaminate the environment] having a much greater effect. Projects are going ahead, and a lot of employees both in and outside the office are able to work from home. There has also only been a limited rate of Covid-19 infection. The greatest impact relates to people’s ability to meet in person – an important factor in a culture that involves a lot of collaboration. As well as measures to promote safe working, I believe that another aspect of the organisation’s resilience is a safety culture that has a strong foundation in people holding each other accountable, which employees also need to apply in their private lives,. We recently moved forward in this area by training primary managers in risk perception and risk leadership, two important aspects when it comes to promoting the right behaviour.

    I also conduct assessments for compliance assessment agencies: certifying bodies and inspectorates. In these assessments it is sometimes difficult to conduct on-site inspections/audits of businesses. This can prevent proof of compliance (certificates, reports) from being issued/extended or even cause them to be withdrawn, which in turn causes problems with demonstrating compliance, and this can be a barrier to trade.

    Bio:
    Hans Berkien started out as a civil-engineering business expert, setting up management systems in the road construction industry. After completing his certification processes, he moved to the Dutch Accreditation Council, the regulatory body for compliance assessment organisations. He later returned to the civil concrete construction sector as a quality manager and QHSE manager. In recent years he has focused on compliance and control matters.

  • Erik van de Ven - Technical manager & Expert fire safety at The Central Government Real Estate Agency

    Now, more than ever before, the current conditions within Dutch real estate demand that we create value by taking a realistic approach to opportunities and risks.

    • Anticipate volatility in the project environment. 
    • Uncertainty is a given; be aware of it and make it explicit. 
    • Aim to turn ambiguity into clarity. 
    • Complex systems create the challenge. 

    This is known as the VUCA dynamic, and it requires leadership not from one individual, but from all of us together.

    Bio:

    Technical Manager and Fire Safety Expert at the Central Government Real Estate Agency, which works for and on behalf of the Dutch State. Specialised in technically complex project environments (including laboratories, command centres and healthcare) and projects with a special security signature.