People

IR. Veale B.E(Hons). (ALLAN J.)

IR. VEALE B.E(HONS). (ALLAN J.)

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FUNCTION

Post-doctoral fellow

FIELDS OF INTEREST

  • Rigid and compliant actuators
  • Biomimetic and user-centered design
  • Mechanical design
  • Soft wearable sensors
  • Novel portable energy sources
  • Wearable assistive robots

BIOGRAPHY

Allan J. Veale holds a B.E(Hons). in Mechatronics Engineering from the University of Auckland (2013) and is awaiting the defense of his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, also studied at the University of Auckland (2017).

During Allan’s Ph.D. he developed a wearable fluidic actuator with embedded sensors for rehabilitation devices along with modelling tools. This is the first step towards his vision of dedicating practical research to the development and commercialisation of sustainable mechatronics technologies and methodologies, such as muscle-like actuators, for medical devices that enable people with health and mobility impairments to engage fully in society, in first or third world countries.

In his spare time Allan enjoys making and repairing things; exploring the outdoors by foot or on bike; and helping out people in the local community, particularly partnering with churches to serve those with disabilities.

PUBLICATIONS

Veale, A.J., Anderson, I.A. and Xie S.Q. (2016). Characterizing the Peano fluidic muscle and the effects of its geometry properties on its behavior. Smart Materials and Structures 25(6): 1-14.

Veale, A.J., Anderson, I.A. and Xie S.Q. (2016). Modeling the Peano fluidic muscle and the effects of its material properties on its static and dynamic behavior. Smart Materials and Structures 25(6): 1-16.

Veale, A.J. and Xie, S.Q. (2016). Towards compliant and wearable robotic orthoses: A review of current and emerging actuator technologies. Medical Engineering & Physics 38(4): 317-325.

Veale, A.J., Xie, S.Q. and Anderson, I.A. (2017). Accurate and versatile multivariable arbitrary piecewise model regression of nonlinear fluidic muscle behavior. IEEE International Conference on Mechatronics (Gippsland, Australia), Feb 13-15, 1-6.

Veale, A.J., Anderson, I.A. and Xie, S.Q. (2016). Dielectric elastomer strain and pressure sensing enable reactive soft fluidic muscles. SPIE Smart Structures/NDE (Las Vegas, NV), Mar 20-24, 97982A-1-8.

Veale, A.J., Anderson, I.A. and Xie, S.Q. (2015). The smart Peano fluidic muscle: a low profile flexible orthosis actuator that feels pain. SPIE Smart Structures/NDE (San Diego, CA), Mar 8-12, 94351V-1-11.