Quantification of the TMS-EEG response in epilepsy

Project description:

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a relatively noninvasive method to stimulate the brain. With TMS the excitability of the brain can be measured, for example by determining the motor threshold: the lowest intensity of a magnetic pulse which induces a motor evoked potential. In several neurological conditions, the cortical excitability may be changed. Patients suffering from epilepsy, for instance, have an increased cortical excitability. 

Recently, combined TMS-EEG has become technically available. TMS induces a cortical response that can be measured with the EEG, resulting in a TMS evoked potential, the TEP. The advantage of combining TMS and EEG is that it is a direct measurement of cortical excitability. In addition, the response of other areas than motor or visual cortex can be studied with TMS-EEG. TMS-EEG may prove relevant for various clinical applications. 

The aim of this project is to explore different techniques of signal analysis leading to a reliable quantification of the TMS-EEG response and to investigate the differences in TMS-EEG response between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from epilepsy.

This graduation project is part of the PhD project of Esther ter Braack.

Supervisors:

Prof. dr. ir. M.J.A.M. van Putten (University of Twente & Medisch Spectrum Twente)

E.M. ter Braack, MSc (University of Twente)

Contact:

Inês Silva Santos