Healthcare Design

Increase in quality of medical care and a higher life expectancy have led to economical pressure on our healthcare systems. To counterbalance this, patients are doctored for shorter periods in hospitals and elderly enter in later stages into institutional care. We increasingly receive care at home and are expected to engage in a variety of forms of self-care and –monitoring. Technology plays an important role in this societal shift. Smart domestic products, wearables and applications are promising tokens for enabling us to stay independent, monitor our health, manage our own informal care network, stay in touch with professionals and even preventively help us to develop a healthy lifestyle.

In designing such technologies it is crucial to involve users, family members, and professional care-givers, to ensure that products and services will be effective, meaningful, ethically feasible and practically usable. In this research track, we develop suitable co-design methods to design such products and services, and tailor some of them specifically to particular user groups, such as people with dementia or an Autism Spectrum Condition.

CURRENT PROJECTS

MinD

Designing for people with dementia: designing for mindful self-empowerment and social engagement. This project is funded from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement.


Contactperson
Julia Garde Dr. ir.
Assistant professor