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Digital Narrative

The winter school is meant for PhD students, postdoc and experienced researchers who want to improve their competences in doing and understanding narrative research. Experience with qualitative research is recommended (for required entry levels please contact Anneke Sools).

Learning Goals

At the end of the winter school, the participant is able to

  • Critically reflect on different approaches in digital narrative research;
  • Critically reflect on the influence of digitalization on storytelling;
  • Apply story line analysis to own data.

 Content

The theme of this year’s winter school is digital narrative. Digital technologies provide an ever more important medium for storytelling. Hence, the effects this has on the nature and quality of stories are increasingly studied. Digital technologies, like natural language processing, are also becoming more important in the analysis of stories. This interdisciplinary winter school with researchers from the humanities, behavioral, and social sciences not only takes stock, but also provides hands-on experiences in narrative analysis. 

The first day of the winter school offers an introduction to narrative analysis. Anneke Sools will give an introduction to story line analysis for novice and experienced narrative researchers. In an interactive workshop, participants will work together on an example text to gain hands-on experience with storyline analysis. Steven Willemsen will reflect on the role of mediality in storytelling, discussing how digital narratives integrate a variety of medial channels to tell engaging stories. On the second day, two experienced researchers will give inspirational interactive lectures on their narrative work involving digital technologies. Sjoerd-Jeroen Moenandar will provide an interactive lecture on narrative interview methods and the analysis of plots and genres in stories of becoming. Stephan Andrade will provide an interactive lecture on the digital analysis of stories, using the Digital Story Grammar, a methodology that nicely complements storyline analysis. Students also have time for doing hands-on storyline analysis. The third day consists of preparing and giving group presentations of story line analyses, to be discussed with the lecturers and the participants. Participants have to prepare themselves by studying reader texts, watching microlectures, and doing homework assignments.

Lecturers

Stefan Andrade is senior researcher at Vive, the Danish Center for Social Science Research. He developed the Digital Story Grammar, a unique methodology as it integrates state-of-the-art theoretical insights from the narrative approach with innovative methods for computerized text analysis.

Sjoerd-Jeroen Moenander is assistant professor with the Minorities & Multilingualism programme at the University of Groningen. He works on border thinking - the way humans conceive of themselves as opposed to something or someone else - as manifested and negotiated in the stories we tell. In his recent research, he has tried to develop an applied narratology: using the insights and findings ofnarrative studies to improve storytelling practices. 

Anneke Sools is assistant professor in Narrative Psychology at the University of Twente. Her research focuses on methodological innovations in story line analysis as well as on the use of narrative accounts of imagined futures to foster creativity and possibility-thinking in the face of uncertainty and change.

Gerben Westerhof is professor in Narrative Psychology and Technology at the University of Twente. His research focuses on how life stories contribute to identity development and mental health across the lifespan. He develops digital methodologies for narrative analysis and designs and evaluates (digital) narrative interventions.

Steven Willemsen is assistant professor in Narrative Theory & Intermediality at the University of Groningen, and a senior researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics in Frankfurt am Main. His research focuses on cognitive narratology, complex storytelling in film and audiovisual media, and psychological approaches to the arts.

PROGRAMME

Tuesday 23 November
09.30     Welcome with coffee
10.00     Story Lab @UTwente (Gerben Westerhof)
10.30     Workshop Story Line Analysis (Anneke Sools)
12.30     Lunch
13.30     Pitches of participants
15.00     Coffee and tea break
15.30     Interactive lecture Steven Willemsen including coffee and tea breaks
17.30     Leisure Time
18.30     Dinner (costs not included)

Wednesday 24 November
09.00     Interactive lecture Sjoerd-Jeroen Moenandar
10.30     Storyline analysis on own data
12.30     Lunch
13.30     Interactive lecture Stephan Andrade including coffee and tea breaks
15.30     Continue storyline analysis on own data
17.30     Leisure Time
18.30     Dinner with lecturers (costs not included)

Thursday 25 November
09.00     Preparing Presentations
10.15     Coffee and tea break
10.30     Group presentations with feedback from lecturers
12.30     Lunch
13.30     Continue group presentations with feedback from lecturers including coffee and  tea breaks
15.30     Evaluation
15.45     Coffee and Tea Break
16.00     Optional: consultation hour on individual research
17.00     End of day 3

  • Venue

    UPark

  • ECTS

    2

  • Number of Participants

    25

  • Programme / Lecturers

    Anneke Sools & Gerben Westerhof

    Story Lab

    +31.53.489.6314; +31.53.489.6074

    a.m.sools@utwente.nl; g.j.westerhof@utwente.nl

  • Programme is for

    PhDs, postdoc and experienced researchers

  • Course costs

    PhDs of the University of Twente are free of charge


    Postdoc and experienced researchers:

    € 350 (including lunches, coffee/tea breaks and reader, excluding dinner and stay)

Contact Information
Daniëlle Boelen & Talitha Ruarus
Secretariat Psychology, Health and Technology
+31.53.489.9180; +31.53.489.1289
 pgt@utwente.nl
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Digital Narrative
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