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Hall of fame
Top 10 most liked articles
Present, past & future
This storyline is the mutual story of all NanoLab and Cleanroom users. All users share their personal stories like groundbreaking moments in research, entering partnerships, purchase and construction of equipment, figurehead actions, and so on.

The Timeline allows us to continuously show everyone - from MESA+ employees and colleagues at the University of Twente, to our academic peers, the press and the general public - what our ideas are, what we do, and how we do it; in a special environment, with a unique chemistry.

We challenge you to share your story by filling in the form 'Add your own story'..
DEC
2016
MESA+
Nanotechnology has the potential to impact many aspects of our lives. Seeking to harness the properties of materials manipulated on an atomic or molecular level, researchers have gained high esteem for much-needed breakthroughs in domains ranging from health and security to energy and robotics. Meet MESA+, a leading player in this exciting field – and find out how our research, education, facilities and entrepreneurship may help you change our world. … Read more
DEC
2016
Storyline Theme: Sensing, Science & Technology
In developing ever smaller (bio-)sensors for analysing bio markers in body fluids, it has become evident that conventional manufacturing methods have almost reached their limits. At MESA+, therefore, we believe future early diagnostics applications will rely on innovative biosensor production technologies – as well as a deeper understanding of their detection principles. Our researchers are among the world’s pioneers in this field.

For the rest of this year, the Timeline will adopt the theme of Sensing, Science & Technology. … Read more
EducationEquipmentProductsResearchAdvanced materialsComputational scienceFluidicsPhotonicsSoft matterHealthSecurity
DEC 30
2016
Het MESA sprookje
Er was eens......een afdeling die zich bezig hield met het produceren van diodes en transistoren. Dat was een precies werkje. Ze werkten onder andere met silicium. … Read more
EducationPeopleProductsResearch
DEC
2016
Healthier people, cleaner planet. UCLA’s Prof. Dr. Aydogan Ozcan
The vision of Prof. Dr. Aydogan Ozcan is one of breath-taking scope. As a specialist in photonics-based imaging and sensing technologies at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), he envisions cars and homes that will act as our personal labs. They will monitor our health, provide early diagnoses and administer preventive and curative care to keep us healthy and well while hardly even interrupting with our daily affairs. But that is not all. Ozcan wants to use the same technologies to facilitate a giant leap in the screening and improvement of air and water quality in cities, oceans and skies around the world – saving lives and cleaning up our planet. … Read more
DEC 25
2016
What's the dress code today?
Research on the nanometre scale needs a laboratory with extreme specifications. Any influencing effects from the environment are virtually non-existent. To accomplish this, all kinds of precautions have to be taken to ensure that the cleanroom remains as clean as possible. For this reason the staff who work in the cleanroom wear specially designed suits. These suits are already in use since the opening of the first cleanroom in 1990. … Read more
Equipment
OCT 30
2016
Storyline Theme: Unconventional Electronics
As our world gets more and more digitized, conventional electronic circuits are pushed to their limits. In a few decades, the number of transistors on a single chip has grown from a thousand on the earliest integrated circuits to more than two billion. Further downsizing is becoming progressively more difficult, while the relative gains are also decreasing. To satisfy the massive demands for electronics, a new kind of energy-efficient computational power is required: Unconventional Electronics. For the rest of this year, the Timeline will adopt the theme of Unconventional Electronics. … Read more
EducationResearchComputational scienceEnergySecurity
OCT 29
2016
Our next step: a network of nanomaterial neural networks – a kind of nano-Internet
Recently, MESA+ researchers provided proof of principle for an unconventional nanoscale network carrying out logic operations. The next step, says professors Wilfred G. van der Wiel, is to build a network of such networks, ‘a kind of nano-Internet’. This new system, he adds, will be capable of tackling the real problems currently causing headaches in advanced computing: the recognition of complex patterns, such as faces and facial expressions, hand writing – or cancer cells. Many scientists around the world have joined this quest for the keys to neuromorphic, or brain-like, computing. MESA+’s special angle: using nanomaterials that can evolve naturally into ‘nanocomputers’ using their own physical properties. … Read more
ResearchComputational scienceEnergySustainability
OCT 29
2016
Prof. Dr. Stuart Parkin on the future of computing
Prof. Dr. Stuart Parkin is not one to sit back and rest on his laurels. While his discoveries in magneto-resistive thin film structures enabled a more than 1000-fold increase in the storage capacity of magnetic disk drives, earning him the Millennium Technology Award from the Technology Academy Finland in 2014, he remains relentless in his quest for a new kind of computer that will combine unprecedented capacity with unprecedented energy efficiency. Viewing the human brain as the cynosure of this field of science, he comments, ‘We must try and do better than nature.’ … Read more
ResearchComputational scienceEnergySecuritySustainability
OCT 29
2016
Proper breeding ground for germanene
Graphene may currently be the best known ‘two dimensional’ material, its new cousin germanene seems to have properties that are even more attractive for application in electronics. For this, germanene has to grow in a one atom layer on top of a proper carrier - substrate. Scientists of the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology of the University of Twente managed to grow germanene on a semiconductor material, preserving the unique properties. In two separate papers in the same edition of Physical Review Letters, they present calculations ánd experiments. … Read more
ResearchAdvanced materialsComputational scienceEnergy
OCT 28
2016
MESA+ spinoff Solmates’ PLD machine enables MESA+ to take a step in the direction of industry
The University of Twente’s MESA+ research institute has purchased an advanced Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) machine from its research partner, the spin-off company Solmates. As a result, new scientific knowledge in the areas of unconventional electronics and advanced materials will be more accessible, as well as more suitable for practical application at an earlier stage. … Read more
EquipmentAdvanced materialsComputational science
OCT 28
2016
New theory on how to control energy transfer between molecules
Scientists at the Technical University of Denmark, the University of Twente (MESA+) and the FOM Foundation have settled an old scientific debate on whether or not the energy transfer between two molecules depends on their nano-environment. … Read more
ResearchComputational scienceEnergy
SEP
2016
Strategic Impulse for MESA+ research and application areas
Recently MESA+ invited her researchers to submit research ideas in the Strategic Stimulation Call 2016. In this call research initiatives are stimulated that contribute to the MESA+ long term strategy; strengthening the current multidisciplinary application areas ‘Unconventional electronics’, Early diagnostics & sensing’ and ‘Storage and conversion of renewable energy’, or explore possible new areas in research or application. The beneficiaries of the MESA+ strategic stimulations call were announced at the MESA+ Meeting on 26 September in Kinepolis, Enschede.

Professor dr. Jeroen Cornelissen, Scientific Director MESA+: “With the available resources we aim to invest in new scientific innovations and further interdisciplinary collaborations. This will further strengthen the present application areas or create new ones. In that way we ensure a successful continuation of the outstanding research and infrastructure of the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology." … Read more
BusinessResearchAdvanced materialsComputational scienceFluidicsPhotonicsSoft matter
SEP 26
2016
And the winner is...Loes Segerink
MONDAY 26 SEPTEMBER DURING THE ANNUAL MESA+ MEETING THE DAVE BLANK OUTREACH AWARD WAS INTRODUCED AND AWARDED. THE PRIZE IS AWARDED TO A MESA+ RESEARCHER WITH EXCEPTIONAL OUTREACH ACTIVITIES.

The 2016 winner is Loes Segerink because of her multiplicity and diversity in media performances, her enthusiasm in these performances and the inspiring manner she draws (inter)national attention for her research. In this she is a role model for other young researchers. The Dave Blank Outreach Award consists of €1.000,- to be spend on outreach activities. … Read more
ResearchAdvanced materialsHealth
MAR
2016
Herinnert u zich deze nog ? (deel 2)
The basis in the cleanroom from 1996-2000 has stayed the same compared to the present, like the analytical techniques and supplies. There are more methods to make more precise structures on the very small scale, such as the fabrication of nanostructures using Nanoscribe and Nanoimprint. … Read more
EquipmentPeopleResearch
MAR
2016
Herinnert u zich deze nog?
The Soft matter, Fluidics and Interfaces group of Rob Lammertink uses the TCOater equipment for the deposition of titanium dioxide and zirconia to make catalytic surfaces for the microfluidic devices. … Read more
ResearchFluidics
FEB 27
2016
We proudly present...the NANOscribe
The Soft matter, Fluidics and Interfaces group uses the 3D Nanoscribe equipment to make very small 3D structures. With this machine it is possible to make ion selective layers with high precision for sub micrometer structures.The diameters of the channels need to be in the order of nanometers. The channels have a charge so counter ions are allowed to be there. Ions with the same charge are not allowed. … Read more
EquipmentResearchFluidicsSoft matter
FEB
2016
This week on University of the Netherlands: Dave Blank
Professor and Chief Scientific Ambassador at University of Twente Dave Blank, will appear on the University of the Netherlands show every day this week. In his series of lectures, he will discuss the possibilities offered by nanotechnology. Topics to be discussed include the solar cells of the future, smart materials that allow you to charge your mobile phone while walking and a nano pill that can detect illnesses.  … Read more
EducationProductsAdvanced materialsHealthSustainability
FEB 12
2016
Professor Rob Lammertink receives Vici grant
Professor Rob Lammertink a top researcher at the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology at the University of Twente is awarded a Vici award 2015 for the project ‘Mixing at the boundary’ from the The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). … Read more
PeopleResearchFluidicsEnergyWater
DEC
2015
Sputterke 21 years
Sputterke, one of the key machines in the cleanroom, reached the honorable age of 21 years. For humans this means being a grown up, for sputter coaters this would mean retirement. This is not the case for Sputterke! In the last 16 years, 27.000 wafers have been processed with this robust sputter coater. … Read more
Equipment
NOV 5
2015
Nano Power Pills (placebo peppermints)
"After taking nano power pills your perspective will transcend to the nano size" These and other indications and side effects are described in the user leaflet. The placebo peppermints were used as a souvenir for the 5 yrs NanoLab anniversary They are a real conversation starter about nanotechnology. … Read more
EducationProducts
NOV 5
2015
Five years of the NanoLab at the University of Twente in ten figures
1.) 120,000 hours of cleanroom research … Read more
EquipmentResearch
SEP 9
2015
UT spin-off Eurekite teams up with Cottonwood
Eurekite, the first worldwide provider of a new nanotechnology based flexible ceramics, announced today that Cottonwood Euro Technology Funds, an affiliate of the top performing seed stage investor in science based technology start-ups in the US, has closed on founding capital to begin operations in Enschede, The Netherlands. … Read more
BusinessProductsResearchAdvanced materials
JUL 24
2015
(nano) college volgen op de Zwarte Cross
Was Guus Rijnders op de Zwarte Cross al gitarist in de band Playin’L-Street, (vernoemd naar de Lariksstraat in Lichtenvoorde) nu geeft hij samen met Albert van den Berg en Dave Blank colleges in de Universitent.
“Ze delen hun kennis met het Zwarte Cross publiek. In jip-en-janneketaal doen deze top of the bill professoren uit de doeken waarom ze hun vakgebied zo geweldig vinden. Machtig interessant! En het mooie is: je hoeft helemaal geen professor te zijn om deze colleges te begrijpen!’
De onderwerpen in deze editie van de Universitent zijn: Prof. Dave Blank “Nano is groots”, Prof. Guus Rijnders “Poep, plas en adem ruiken, daar wordt je beter van en ”Prof. Albert van den Berg “Gezonde chips voor de mens”. Wat wil een mens nog meer! … Read more
EducationPeopleAdvanced materialsComputational scienceHealthSustainabilityWater
MAY 26
2015
UT Heroes
European research grant of 2.25 million euros for the development of blood vessels on a chip. UT professor Albert van den Berg has scooped the prestigious ERC Advanced Grant from the European Union for the second time. … Read more
ResearchFluidicsHealthSustainability
DEC 14
2014
‘Onkraakbare’ bankpasjes door nieuwe methode MESA+
Onderzoekers van MESA+ zijn er, in samenwerking met de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, in geslaagd een methode te ontwikkelen die het onmogelijk maakt pasjes zoals creditcards en identiteitsbewijzen te kraken. Zelfs als criminelen over alle informatie beschikken die over het pasje bekend is bij de fabrikant, voorkomt deze methode het kopiëren of nabootsen ervan. De methode heet Quantum-Secure Authentication (QSA) en is veilig door het gebruik van een slimme combinatie van lichtverstrooiing aan nanodeeltjes in de unieke sleutel en kwantumeigenschappen van licht. … Read more
ProductsResearchPhotonicsSecurity
OCT 15
2014
FOM Valorisation Prizes 2014 awarded to Dave Blank and Guus Rijnders
The FOM Valorisation Prize 2014 has been awarded to professor Dave Blank and professor Guus Rijnders, both top researchers at the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology at the University of Twente. … Read more
PeopleResearch
AUG
2014
Janneke Hoedemaekers new business director MESA +
From 1 August 2014, Janneke Hoedemaekers will be the new Business Director of the MESA+ Research Institute for Nanotechnology of Twente University. She will succeed Miriam Luizink. … Read more
BusinessPeople
APR
2014
Physics of Fluids: Nature photo of the year
De foto "DROP EVERYTHING" van Mark-Jan van der Meulen en Arjan van der Bos van de MESA+ Physics of Fluids groep (POF) Nature's Photo of the year 2014. … Read more
ResearchFluidics
FEB 12
2014
Kitty Nijmeier ambassadeur van het eerste uur!
Als hoogleraar Membrane Science and Technology weet zij boeiend te vertellen over membranen die CO2 afvangen, energie uit zee- en rivierwater, maar ook over membraanontwikkeling voor waterzuivering, drinkwaterbereiding en afvalwaterbehandeling. En dat allemaal in de kroeg in Deventer. … Read more
PeopleProductsResearchFluidicsSustainabilityTransportWater
MAY 16
2013
Opening High Tech Factory
On Thursday the 16th of May 2013 High Tech Factory officially opened her doors. This opening ceremony marked the start of the production facility High Tech Factory. Now that the former laboratory complex on the University of Twente campus has undergone a complete transformation, companies established in High Tech Factory have almost 5,000 square metres of cleanroom, laboratories and office space at their disposal. … Read more
Business
MAR
2013
VPRO gids maakt kleinste cover ooit
Ter illustratie van een bijlage over ‘alchemie van de 21ste eeuw’ liet de VPRO Gids een minuscule cover maken met behulp van nanotechnologie. Om een idee te geven van hoe ontzettend klein dingen zijn op nanoschaal, ging een delegatie van de VPRO Gids naar het Mesa+ Nanolab van de Universiteit Twente. … Read more
ResearchAdvanced materials
NOV 1
2012
Prototype of the Piezoelectric Field Effect Transistor for lower power consumption
Researchers of the MESA+ institute, in collaboration with the company SolMateS, have developed a new type of transistor to reduce the power consumption of microchips.The basic element of modern electronics, namely the transistor, suffers from significant current leakage. By enveloping a transistor with a shell of piezoelectric material, which distorts when voltage is applied, researchers were able to reduce this leakage by a factor of five (compared to a transistor without this material). The research was performed by Buket Kaleli (now with ASML), Ray Hueting and Rob Wolters from the Semiconductor Components group. Staff from SolMateS, a University of Twente spin-off company, applied the piezoelectric layer to the transistor. The research was financially supported by the technology foundation STW. … Read more
Research
SEP
2011
The importance of Catalytic cleaning of water by the SFI group
The SFI research group researches catalytic cleaning of water. Reduction of nitrates and bromates is a big challenge. The group has explored how to carry out the reaction selectively. The project is in collaboration with Catalytic Processes and Materials group of Leon Lefferts. Besides photocatalytic cleaning of water was researched in collaboration with the PhotoCatalytic Synthesis (PCS) group of Guido Mul. … Read more
ResearchFluidicsEnergyWater
AUG 23
2011
Nano waterfalls
During a thunderstorm on August 23 2011, there were these Nano waterfalls. … Read more
NOV
2010
NanoLab opened by Prince Willem-Alexander
On 5 November 2010, King Willem-Alexander (who was still a Prince at the time) wrote ‘I declare the MESA+ NanoLab open' on a human hair. Since that day, the largest nanotechnology research facility in the Netherlands has been a reality. … Read more
People
NOV
2010
Nanotechnologie in Twente - Klokhuis
Nanotechnologie in Twente uitgelegd door Klokhuis. … Read more
EducationResearchAdvanced materialsComputational scienceFluidicsPhotonicsSoft matter
JUN
2010
En..herinnert u zich deze ook nog.. the Powderblast!
The Powderblast tool makes holes on the chip where the capillaries need to be attached. This can also be achieved with Adixen equipment. … Read more
EquipmentResearchFluidics
SEP 1
2009
The first impression poster of the new Nanolab
During the last part of the building of our new Nanolab all users and visitors of the old lab could take a peek in the new lab on the first impression poster. … Read more
Equipment
FEB 27
2007
65 jaar en een eredoctoraat !
Prof. David Reinhoudt, hoogleraar Supramoleculaire Chemie aan de Universiteit Twente, ontvangt een eredoctoraat van de Universitá degli Studi di Parma in Italië. Reinhoudt, tot voor kort ook wetenschappelijk directeur van het MESA+ Instituut voor Nanotechnologie, wordt internationaal geroemd vanwege zijn bijdrage aan de supramoleculaire chemie en nanotechnologie.

Reinhoudt krijgt het eredoctoraat later dit jaar uit handen van zijn erepromotor, prof. Rocco Ungaro. De Universiteit van Parma is één van de oudste universiteiten ter wereld, de historie reikt terug tot de 11de eeuw. … Read more
EducationPeopleResearchAdvanced materialsComputational science
JAN 1
2007
Building the NanoLab
Building the NanoLab

In the period of 2007 to 2009 the remarkable buildings NanoLab and Carré werd build on the Campus of the University of Twente. They were part of a big renovation plan of the campus, to provide excellent buildings and facilities; a precondition of the university's 'core business'. … Read more
Equipment
JUN 1
2005
NWO Spinoza Prize 2005 for Professor Detlef Lohse
Professor Lohse received the NWO Spinoza Prize 2005 for his groundbreaking research on sonoluminescence and his research in the area of heat transport and turbulence. … Read more
PeopleResearch
APR 1
2003
Lintje Piet Bergveld
'Ik heb het een half jaar geheim gehouden', zegt de vrouw van Piet Bergveld terwijl ze in het zaaltje bij MESA+ wacht totdat haar man binnenkomt. 'Niemand heb ik het verteld. Ik dacht: hoe minder mensen het weten, hoe kleiner de kans dat het uitlekt.' En dat op 1 april 2003. Burgemeester Mans speldt het lintje op de bodywarmer van de kersverse Ridder in de Orde van de Nederlandse Leeuw. Zijn vrouw: 'Ik durfde niet te zeggen dat hij een jasje aan moest doen. Dat zou opvallen.' … Read more
PeopleResearch
JAN
2003
Master's programme nanotechnology started in 2003
The Master’s in Nanotechnology started in 2003. The master Nanotechnology is an internationally oriented programme and is taught entirely in English. You can start in September or February.

The two-year MSc programme in Nanotechnology focuses on the design, creation and study of functional materials, structures, devices and systems by directly controlling matter on the nanometre scale. … Read more
EducationAdvanced materialsComputational scienceFluidicsPhotonicsSoft matter
FEB 2
2000
Tom Aarnink- rubriek Mens & Werk van UT-nieuws 3 februari 2000
Tom Aarnink (41), technoloog bij Mesa+, heeft in de twintig jaar dat hij voor de UT werkt de micro-elektronica zien veranderen in nano-elektronica. 'In de eerste jaren', vertelt Aarnink, 'richtte EL zich op het ontwikkelen van complete CMOS-transistoren, zeg maar halfgeleidende schakelaars in chips. Maar de ontwikkelingen gaan zo snel, dat een faculteit de race met de industrie niet kan bijbenen. Om die transistoren steeds kleiner te kunnen maken, zul je om de paar jaar volledig nieuwe, geavanceerde apparatuur moeten aanschaffen. Dat kost miljoenen.' En dus stapte Aarninks leerstoel, halfgeleidercomponenten, over op 'processtaponderzoek'. … Read more
PeoplePhotonics
JAN
2000
David Reinhoudt the Dutch pioneer of supramolecular chemistry
After many years of highly influential work in this field, in the past 15 years his attention has shifted towards applications in nanoscience and -technology. He has achieved enormous success in this area, as witnessed by his Simon Stevin Mastership Award of the Dutch Applied Science Foundation in 1998. He has participated in numerous collaborations working on single-molecule photonics and electronics and microfluidics, and is one of The Netherlands' most productive scientists with more than 800 refereed publications, books, and patents. … Read more
BusinessEducationPeopleResearchAdvanced materialsComputational scienceFluidics
JAN 15
1999
Afscheid professor Fluitman
Het interview in UT nieuws met professor Fluitman bij zijn afscheid van MESA op 15 januari 1999. … Read more
People
JUN
1997
Mesa+ impression for Rob Lammertink
In 1997, Mesa+ began to play a role for Rob Lammertink at this time he was a PhD student. The Mesa+ gave him the impression that momentum is generated, things are done together and people are connected with each other, which work good and strong. … Read more
PeopleResearch
DEC 12
1990
His Royal Highness Prince Claus opens mesa Twente
When Prince Claus opened 'MESA Twente' - the forerunner to the NanoLab - in 1990, the talk was of micrometres: one-thousandth of a millimetre. … Read more
People
DEC 12
1990
Opening cleanroom 12 december 1990
Op 12 december 1990 werd de cleanroom geopend door Prins Claus. Het publiek bestaat onder andere uit medewerkers van de faculteit Electrotechniek. … Read more
People
MAY 11
1984
Opening S&A lab
Op 11 mei 1984 is het zo ver: het S&A lab wordt geopend op vloer 6 van EL/TN (het Huidige Hogenkamp). Het laboratorium van 280 m2 is een verlengstuk van de vakgroep laboratoria en wordt dus gebruikt door medewerkers en studenten van de vakgroepen Instrumentele elektronica en Elektronische Ontwerpkunde, Bio-Informatica, Transduktietechniek, Materiaalkunde van Transducenten. … Read more
EquipmentResearch
JUN
1981
Hoe het allemaal begon
Prof. dr. Jan Fluitman was directeur van het eerste onderzoeks instituut aan de UT MESA+ Micro Electronics, Materials Engineering en Sensors & Actuators. Hij was één van de initiatoren bij het oprichten van het S&A lab. … Read more
EquipmentPeopleResearch

MESA+

Nanotechnology has the potential to impact many aspects of our lives. Seeking to harness the properties of materials manipulated on an atomic or molecular level, researchers have gained high esteem for much-needed breakthroughs in domains ranging from health and security to energy and robotics. Meet MESA+, a leading player in this exciting field – and find out how our research, education, facilities and entrepreneurship may help you change our world.

In developing ever smaller (bio-)sensors for analysing bio markers in body fluids, it has become evident that conventional manufacturing methods have almost reached their limits. At MESA+, therefore, we believe future early diagnostics applications will rely on innovative biosensor production technologies – as well as a deeper understanding of their detection principles. Our researchers are among the world’s pioneers in this field.

For the rest of this year, the Timeline will adopt the theme of Sensing, Science & Technology.

Het MESA sprookje

Er was eens......een afdeling die zich bezig hield met het produceren van diodes en transistoren. Dat was een precies werkje. Ze werkten onder andere met silicium.

Daar werkte ook Professor Piet Bergveld die zijn tijd ver vooruit was en eigenlijk de wijde wereld in wilde. Hij zag enorm veel kansen. Sensoren maken om PH te meten en bloedwaardes op te sporen, dat waren mooie dingen. Anderen vonden dat niet compatibel met hun manier van werken en er ontstond wetenschappelijke en technologische onenigheid. Tenslotte gingen de wetenschappers met “ruzie” uit elkaar. Het leek een beetje op een stammenstrijd. Ieder ging zijns weegs.

Ze noemden zichzelf vanaf nu S&A en ICE. Twee mooie afkortingen voor Sensoren en Actuatoren en Integrated Circuits Elektronica. Ergens op de Campus op vloer 6 van het oude ELTN gebouw, dat nu Hogenkamp heet, werd het S&A lab opgericht. De ICE-ers begonnen ook lekker voor zichzelf, maar in toren 5 van het ELTN gebouw.

Eigenlijk woonden ze hemelsbreed op nog geen 50 meter van elkaar. S&A en ICE konden niet met elkaar, maar ook niet zonder elkaar. De maskerfabricage, de lpcvd en de electronenmicroscoop van meneer Otter hadden ze immers allebeide nodig. Maar echte vrienden zoals vroeger, dat waren ze niet meer.

Opeens, op een mooie dag, lag er aan de Twentse horizon een pot met 30 miljoen guldentjes te stralen. Daar hadden de oude vrienden wel interesse in. Maar er waren meer kapers op de kust. Wat dacht je van die jongens uit Delft en Eindhoven. Delft werkte al een beetje samen met Philips en Eindhoven scharrelde met de telecommers. Wat moesten de oude vrienden dan doen om toch aan het geld te komen.

Ze besloten een afspraak te maken. En zo werd het idee geboren om smart sensors te produceren. Een schot in de roos. Daar had niemand in de wereld ooit aan gedacht. Professor Fluitman probeerde de vrienden nog dichter bij elkaar te brengen en dat lukte. Het geld werd binnengehaald en de oprichting van het instituut Micro Electronics Sensors Actuators was een feit.

En zo leefde MESA nog lang en gelukkig en werd het zelfs MESA+ door de toevoeging van de Analyse groep CMAL.

Healthier people, cleaner planet

‘This is an exciting decade’ UCLA’s Prof. Dr. Aydogan Ozcan.

Dr. Ozcan held a presentation at the recent MESA+ Meeting in the Netherlands on ‘Mobile Imaging, Sensing and Diagnostics through Computational Photonics’. In an interview with our editorial team, he shared some of his vision.

Computation is making the difference

‘The use of light for imaging, sensing and nanoscopy has been around for a while. Our spin on this at my research group is that we have made use of computational techniques, realizing they can help us to significantly simplify measurement tools, while still providing the needed information we expect from their laboratory-grade counterparts,’ says Ozcan, who is the Chancellor’s Professor at UCLA and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Professor. He also leads the Bio- and Nano-Photonics Laboratory at UCLA School of Engineering, is the Associate Director of the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) and co-founder of Holomic/Cellmic LLC, a Los Angeles-based start-up specialized in innovative mobile diagnostics. ‘By using novel theories and numerical algorithms, we can compensate in the digital domain for the lack of complexity of optical components. It means we can address the immediate needs and requirements of mobile health, telemedicine and global health problems. Computation is making the difference.’

Identifying viruses with a smartphone

Computational photonics offers almost unimaginable potential, Ozcan continues. ‘Imagine a smartphone with a 3D-printed interface that can be converted into a high-end and yet extremely cost-effective microscope. It would be capable of detecting molecules, identifying viruses, pathogens or genetic diseases, placing highly reliable diagnostics at the consumer’s fingertips. All of this is becoming feasible with the technologies currently emerging. Laymen will be able to self-monitor their chronic conditions or general health status, with the devices used for it facilitating maximum throughput at minimum cost. We’re talking simple, compact, field-portable early diagnosis instruments – a breakthrough for telemedicine and mobile health applications. Using a simple smartphone-like device, we will be seeing and detecting things even at our homes that  before required a well-resourced lab and professionals.’

Reducing the death toll of poor air quality

Which takes Ozcan’s vision to another realm: that of air and water quality. ‘Did you know that poor indoor air quality is responsible for 4.3 million deaths worldwide every year, and 3.7 million deaths can be traced back to outdoor air problems? Air and water are full of particles, especially at nanoscale, but until now we couldn’t see them at large throughputs; we didn’t know what they were or where they were as a function of space and time. Our measurement equipment was not accurate enough, or too expensive to deploy on a broad scale, limiting our spatial and temporal sampling and measurement frequencies. That problem is about to be solved. With computational photonics, we will have hand-held interfaces that can bridge the gap between the gold-standard lab equipment used to monitor and quantify the air in high-tech laboratories, like the one at the MESA+ Institute, and the low-end consumer tools that, to be quite honest, are currently as good as worthless from a health science point of view.’

Our cars and homes will do advanced lab work

Bringing high-quality data at nano-scale to the consumer will change healthcare first of all, says Ozcan, who already holds 33 issued patents and more than 30 pending patent applications for his inventions in telemedicine, mobile health, nanoscopy, wide-field imaging, lensless imaging, nonlinear optics, fibre optics and optical coherence tomography. ‘We will have cars and homes fitted with sensors that will do the some of the work of private labs while we get on with our daily lives. We will be able to map the pollution and microclimates in buildings and cities caused by air movement, identifying the places where pollutants accumulate and paving the way for improved building designs and urban planning toward cleaner air. Or think of airports: every aircraft landing with its nose toward the wind leaves a trail of nanoparticles that can spread several kilometres from the centre of the airport, causing health and environmental problems we have been unable to map, let alone solve – until now.’

Reaching for the sky – and into the ocean

Panning from cars and homes to buildings, airports and cities, Ozcan’s vision today even encompasses our planet’s oceans and skies. ‘My research still focuses on tele-health and medical diagnostics, the fields in which my career began. But the availability of low-cost, field-portable and autonomous imaging and sensing devices has huge potential for air and water quality all over the world. We can send up drones to measure air quality and map out improvement plans wherever we want – and the same applies to the oceans. Did you know the number one mass in our world’s oceans is not fish, but viruses? What if you could deploy thousands of small, low-cost and autonomous sampling systems out there? Just imagine the data we would have, especially about the diversity of the microbiome, and the change we could bring about using that knowledge – change in areas that until now were far beyond our control.’

‘This is an especially exciting decade’

Ozcan, who has been lauded as one of the USA’s top 10 innovators and in 2012 received the World Technology Award on Health and Medicine, is more than excited about the potential of computational photonics. But his excitement is equalled by an eagerness to collaborate with other parties, such as the MESA+ Institute. ‘MESA+ visited the CNSI facilities at UCLA in February, 2016,’ he says during a tour of the MESA+ Nanolab in the Netherlands. ‘Our missions and operations are similar. It is vital for us to connect and develop collective and individual collaboration initiatives. Nano science and technology have been around for decades, but today are growing exponentially – that is what makes this an especially exciting decade: the things we’ve been talking about are already happening. And the more we learn and transparently grow together, the more we will be able to translate nano science and technology into solutions society needs in order to address our grand challenges.’

By Stephen Teeuwen, for MESA+

What's the dress code today?

Research on the nanometre scale needs a laboratory with extreme specifications. Any influencing effects from the environment are virtually non-existent. To accomplish this, all kinds of precautions have to be taken to ensure that the cleanroom remains as clean as possible. For this reason the staff who work in the cleanroom wear specially designed suits. These suits are already in use since the opening of the first cleanroom in 1990.

More speed, less energy

Roughly speaking, the human brain can perform 100,000 times more operations per second than a single computer chip, using around a tenth of the amount of energy. That makes the brain the indisputable lodestar for the next generation of computer hardware, according to MESA+ professor Wilfred van der Wiel. He and his colleagues, including professor of Programmable Nanosystems Prof. Dr. Ir. Hajo Broersma, are betting on nanomaterials as the key to a brain-like system.

‘Don’t get me wrong, conventional computing can still take us a long way,’ says Van der Wiel, who is professor of NanoElectronics at the University of Twente. ‘Players like Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Twitter are getting better and better at artificial intelligence (AI), such as tagging faces, recognizing individual voices and tracking online behaviour. For simulating neural networks, people have used supercomputers and special hardware, such as graphics processor units (GPUs) field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs)  and tensor processing units (TPUs). But these systems are all still based on conventional computer hardware: they require a logical design and operate on a linear basis, performing in sequence each separate computation required for solving a given problem. Their big limitations are time and energy.’

 The chips are down

Add to that the facts that chips today are no longer getting faster, while demand for advanced computing capacity is soaring, and you’ll understand why all eyes in the computer world are on nano scientists like Van der Wiel and Brinkman. Van der Wiel explains, ‘The chip has reached its maximum speed. We’re only gaining capacity by putting more transistors on a single chip and dividing the chips across multiple cores: more is better. Oh, and we’re reducing their size, of course: currently the minimum chip size is around 14 nanometres. We may be able to cut that down to ten or even seven. But a transistor the size of two atoms is just not possible. Moore’s law – which says the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles approximately every two years – is about to be outdated.’

What conventional computing can and cannot do


Does this mean conventional computation is going the same place Moore’s Law is going? Not by a long shot, says Van der Wiel. ‘There are many things conventional computers can already do a lot better than the human brain can, for example simple arithmetic. And the number of applications for that kind of computation is growing all the time, of course. But when it comes to fuzzier, less clearly defined tasks – tasks that require complex simultaneous operations, like pattern recognition, simulating complex pharmaceutical compounds or machine learning – the brain-like approach is incomparable. And demand for that type of neuromorphic, or brain-like computing is also growing rapidly. It could open up an entirely new era for computing.’

 Ten, fifteen years, maybe a lot less

 ‘No one can tell how long it will take for us to build a genuinely neuromorphic system,’ adds Van der Wiel. ‘Ten, fifteen years – maybe a lot less. But the first steps, like the proof of principle for a nanoscale network carrying out logic operations, have been taken. Companies like IBM and Google are also very active in this field. It is a matter of time before we reach the next breakthrough.’

While no one quite knows how the first brain-like system will be built, or how it will operate, Van der Wiel and his nanoelectronics research group at MESA+ are betting on nanomaterials. ‘What is new and different about our approach is that we are looking for a way to build a system from the bottom-up. So rather than designing a network that can perform pre-determined logical computations, as in conventional computer hardware, we have taken a designless system as our starting point. Instead of having a central processing unit (CPU) carrying out pre-set instructions, our system – which is really nothing more than a heap of two hundred gold nano balls surrounded by a bunch of electrodes – is ‘blank’, so to speak. The functions it can carry out depend on the properties of the nanomaterial and how they evolve under varying electric current conditions. What we found is that by playing around with the current, we can create any logic circuit we want. We just don’t know yet how it happens. The trick is to recognize the right configurations so that they can be reproduced.’

Solving the power problem

On a global scale, Van der Wiel and colleagues are ate the very forefront in developing the kind of reconfigurable, neuromorphic materials with controllable and dynamically adaptable electric or magnetic properties that emulate the neurons and synapses in the human brain – and that any soon will pave the way for the world’s first nano network. Key goals in this pursuit are speed and energy consumption reduction, says Van der Wiel. ‘IT already uses a lot of energy and the rate at which it is spreading further and deeper into every area of life on our planet suggests we have a problem to solve there. Nano computers could be the answer. The human brain can perform computations vastly more complex than anything a state-of-art computer can do today using just 10 to 20 Watts. That is an exciting fact.’

By Stephen Teeuwen for MESA+

‘Breakthroughs are bound to come’

Prof. Dr. Stuart Parkin – director of Germany’s Max Planck Institute of Microstructure PhysicsIBM Fellow, among other things – is among the world’s pioneers in neuromorphic, or brain-like, computing. In an interview at the September 2016 MESA+ Meeting in Enschede, the Netherlands, we asked him to share some of his vision.

‘The brain is still too complicated for us,’ he says, tapping the side of his head and grinning. ‘The concept of neural networks has been around for twenty years, but we really have no understanding of it. We don’t even know where our brain stores memory, or how. But we can guess.’ He shifts forward to the edge of his chair. ‘We can look for principles. We can recognize the opportunity of taking a giant step forward in computing. Nature took several billion years to produce the human brain. But we don’t have to take as long. We can’t afford to. Conventional computing is pretty good, but with computing gaining so much importance and conventional systems requiring so much energy, we have to come up with something different soon. A system similar to the human brain in terms of capacity and low power use. Some completely new kind of device. Something better than nature.’ He smiles, his humility having made way for a confidence that is contagious. ‘With so many clever people all around the world working on the problem from so many angles, breakthroughs are bound to come.’

 Racetrack Memory

At least one major breakthrough in the increase of computer capacity already came from Parkin in 2008, when he found a way of storing digital data in the magnetic domain walls of nanowires – a technology with the potential to enable handheld devices to hold a few thousand movies, run for weeks at a time on a single battery and be practically unbreakable. Making no secret of the hurry he is in to forge ahead, Parkin called the new system ‘Racetrack Memory’. ‘the concept is that by storing many, many bits to main walls and magnetic nanowires, we can build a new type of device that could replace virtually all conventional means of storing digital data. It could replace disk drives; it could replace flash; it could replace most solid state memories. And it would enable much simpler computers in the future’,  he explained in a 2009 Youtube video published by Physics World.

Racetrack technology uses spintronics in a compact form that does not require electricity to maintain the data. It stores digital bits as tiny magnetized regions on nanowires – the racetracks. Unlike other current storage disks and chips, the Racetrack Memory is a 3D device with the nanowires constructed as vertical columns rising like a forest from a silicon chip. The 3D nanostructures provide far more storage density than anything we’ve had before.

Q. When will our smartphones be equipped with Racetrack Memory, or how near is this technology to marketability? What is the main obstacle that has to be overcome?

 ‘The Racetrack Memory has evolved from a concept that depended on the movement of a series of magnetic domain walls via current impulses, which I proposed in 2002, to the validation of this concept in 2008. But in the meantime, we have discovered unforeseen physics that allow us to move these domain walls at speeds ten times higher than the fastest speed we could have hoped for in 2002.  Moreover, we have recently demonstrated these very high domain wall speeds in racetracks in which the magnetic domains and the domain walls themselves have no net magnetization.  The domain walls, if you like, are magnetically invisible! This means we can pack the domain walls very closely together to achieve extremely high memory capacities. Thus the materials and physics have combined to be very favourable for Racetrack Memory. The major challenge now is to find ways to build the three-dimensional Racetrack and the associated reading and writing devices.’

Q. How does Racetrack Memory fit into the bigger story of the quest for a working neuromorphic system, and a new era in computing?

 ‘The Racetrack Memory is distinct from neuromorphic computing systems. It is a novel form of, if you like, memory storage. In time it could replace not only magnetic disk drive storage – because it enables similar or even larger capacity storage – but also some forms of conventional solid-state memories. This is because it offers high performance and is both non-volatile and cheap! Racetrack Memory could support some in-memory computation, because it is certainly possible to imagine ways of carrying out computations using magnetic domain walls. But it’s difficult to imagine how Racetrack Memory could support ultra-low energy computation, which is one of the main thrusts behind neuromorphic computing.’

Another research area you are engaged in is cognitive, or bio-inspired materials. What is currently the most exciting development in this field, and what would you say is the main challenge? What kind of results are you hoping this research will produce?

 ‘The main challenge in building computing materials or devices, or arrays of devices, that could enable cognitive devices, is to realise systems that will consume much less energy than any of today’s computing systems. One very interesting challenge, in my mind, is to work out how to store information not in single devices but spread over many devices, as perhaps we store information in our own brains.  This might mean, for example, that one bit of information is stored in a network of many thousands of connections or nodes.’

Could you give a glimpse of what the world might look like if and when the ambitions you are pursuing become reality? For instance, how will the breakthroughs you are pushing for affect our daily lives, science, and various industries, from health and manufacturing to environmental care and, say, space research?

‘If we could build new computing systems that can operate with energy needs a million times lower than today’s computing systems, then I think that this would further spur the widespread development and use of ‘thinking machines’ throughout the very fabric of our society. Certainly the concept of the Internet of Things is of billions of devices connected to the Internet – but maybe we would rather have billions of devices talking to and communicating through each other. It has always been difficult to understand how our world would be changed by dramatic advances in computing power and in access to data. Today, it is really the latter that has so dramatically impacted our lives. Perhaps in the future it would be the innate thinking capabilities of devices and machines – and, even more so, our nearby environment - that would greatly impact our lives – I think in a very positive way!

If you had to pass on the baton today to the next generation of scientists, what would your message to them be?

‘One should always “think differently” and not follow the madding crowd.’

As the director of the Max Planck Institute, what role do you believe collaboration between different scientific institutes can and should play in the pursuit of answers to the challenges of our time?

‘Collaboration is essential to the quest for knowledge and understanding of our world.  Today it seems, more and more, that one needs to combine knowledge from so many different disciplines – engineering, the natural sciences, the biological sciences, mathematics, and beyond – to solve the greatest challenges of our times. Of course, these go beyond our direct needs at this time – for example, in terms of energy, sustainability and the environment – to important philosophical questions, even about the meaning and purpose of our lives. In this regard, the Max Planck Society is very well positioned to address many of these challenges, since its institutes have leading scientists in all these domains and the Society strongly encourages collaboration and interaction among its institutes to focus on the truly most difficult and impactful challenges that affect all of our lives.’

How might the kind of scientific developments you have described help us in our pursuit of answers to these existential questions?  

‘I am not sure that I can add more, but I do believe that as machines become more and more capable and as they take over much of our thinking this will make us wonder about the purpose of our lives.  Of course, this touches on religion and philosophy and beyond.’

 By Stephen Teeuwen, for MESA+

PROPER BREEDING GROUND FOR GERMANENE

Graphene may currently be the best known ‘two dimensional’ material, its new cousin germanene seems to have properties that are even more attractive for application in electronics. For this, germanene has to grow in a one atom layer on top of a proper carrier - substrate. Scientists of the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology of the University of Twente managed to grow germanene on a semiconductor material, preserving the unique properties. In two separate papers in the same edition of Physical Review Letters, they present calculations ánd experiments.Germanene is a one atom thick sheet of germanium, in a honeycomb structure. It has clear similarities with graphene, the material that induced massive research activity worldwide, especially after 2010’s Nobel Prize. A major difference between graphene and germanene is the ‘band gap’, a property well-known in semiconductor electronics: thanks to this ‘jump’ of energy levels that electrons are allowed to have, it is possible to control, switch and amplify currents. Graphene had a very small band gap that can only be measured at very low temperatures, germanene shows a band gap that is significantly larger. Previous attempts to grow germanene, however, show that these attractive properties seem to vanish when it is grown on a metal surface: a good conductor of current. To prevent this, the UT scientists chose the semiconductor MoS2 as the substrate material.ISLANDSUnder ultra-high vacuum conditions, germanene indeed grows on the semiconductor. At first, the scientists observed islands at the locations where MoS2 had crystal defects, after that the germanene is spreading out covering a larger surface. An exciting question is, if the desired properties remain intact. First measurements show that the typical 2D properties and band gap are present, further low temperature measurements are needed to confirm that germanene operates in the desired way: the inner part would work as an insulator, while conducting channels are formed at the edges.SANDWICHThe other UT scientists did quantum mechanical calculations on the molybdenum-disulfide combination. They, for example, looked at the direction of growth, to be able to optimize the process. The theoretical group went one step further, by not only investigating the bilayer of molybdenum-disulfide, but als covering the germane with molybdeendisulfide. This prevents germanene from rapid oxidation. Calculations show that the sandwich construction has even better performance when it comes to the band gap.Both publications show dat germanene, grown on molybdenum-disulfide is an important first step towards new electronic devices or unsuspected combinations with conventional devices. ‘Spintronics’, based on the spin movement of electrons, seems to be an attractive application area for germanene. Electrons with spin up and electrons with spin down have separate conducting channels on the edges of germanene. Harold Zandvliet recently received a grant for further research on this promising effect.HIGHLIGHTPhysical Review Letters 116 of Jun 24 has both UT publications, presented as a highlight: the first one is of the group Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials of prof Harold Zandvliet, titled ‘Structural and electronic properties of germanene on MoS2, the second of the Computational Materials Science group of Prof Paul Kelly, titled ‘Z2 invariance of germanene on MoS2 from first principles’.

THE UNIVERSITY OF TWENTE’S MESA+ RESEARCH INSTITUTE HAS PURCHASED AN ADVANCED PULSED LASER DEPOSITION (PLD) MACHINE FROM ITS RESEARCH PARTNER, THE SPIN-OFF COMPANY SOLMATES. THIS DEVICE OPENS THE DOOR TO THE CREATION OF NEW MATERIALS AND CHIPS (OR INDIVIDUAL CHIP COMPONENTS), WHICH ARE CONSTRUCTED AS A SERIES OF LAYERS, EACH JUST ONE ATOM THICK. THE NEW MACHINE WILL ENABLE MESA+ TO FURTHER STRENGTHEN ITS POSITION RELATIVE TO INDUSTRY. THIS IS BECAUSE MESA+ NANOLAB’S NUMEROUS RESEARCHERS AND EXTERNAL USERS WILL, FROM NOW ON, BE ABLE TO WORK ON AN INDUSTRIAL SCALE. AS A RESULT, NEW SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE IN THE AREAS OF UNCONVENTIONAL ELECTRONICSAND ADVANCED MATERIALS WILL BE MORE ACCESSIBLE, AS WELL AS MORE SUITABLE FOR PRACTICAL APPLICATION AT AN EARLIER STAGE. 

MESA+, the University of Twente’s nanotechnology research institute, is a leader in the creation of extremely thin layers consisting of just a single layer of atoms. This involves using a laser to transform a material into a plasma, which then condenses on a surface to form an extremely thin layer. By layering multiple very thin layers, one over the other, it is possible to create completely new chips (or individual chip components) and materials with properties that have never been seen before. The technique involved – which was partly developed at the University of Twente – is known as Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD). Arjen Janssens, CEO of Solmates, expects that by around 2020 PLD will have evolved into one of the standard chip production systems.  

INDUSTRIAL SCALE

The limitations of the equipment previously used for this purpose at universities meant that it was only possible to process relatively small areas (10 x 10 millimetres). The new machine that MESA+ has purchased allows you to lay down patterns across much larger areas. Researchers and the other users of the MESA+ NanoLab can now lay down patterns on 20-centimetre-diameter wafers (silicon discs), just like their counterparts in industry. This means that the institute’s research results, and the novel technology it creates, will be directly applicable in industry. Moreover, the new equipment is much more user-friendly, so many more NanoLab users will be able to use it. Janneke Hoedemaekers, the Technical Commercial Director of MESA+, calls this a major step in the direction of industry. “This equipment has many new features, which will enable us to step up our activities from the laboratory scale to the industrial scale. The latter further reinforces our partnership with industry and ensures that our technology, prototypes and knowledge can be applied at an earlier stage. It will also give us extra capabilities for combining complex materials, such as oxidic materials, with silicon technology.” Thus the new equipment is perfectly in keeping with the research conducted at MESA+ in the field of advanced materials and unconventional electronics, i.e. electronics based on completely new materials. Incidentally, University of Twente researchers will not be the only ones to benefit from the new equipment. NanoLab’s facilities are frequently used by external companies (SME) in the region, and from far and wide.  

SOLMATES

Solmates, the company that developed and markets the PLD machine, is a University of Twente spin-off company. It is the only company in the world to manufacture PLD equipment that is suitable for industrial applications. The company has been working on this technology since 2009 and holds a number of important patents. The company sold its first PLD machine in 2013. It recently supplied a machine to IMEC, the leading nanoelectronics research centre. The purchase of this equipment was partly facilitated by NanoLabNL.

Recently MESA+ invited her researchers to submit research ideas in the Strategic Stimulation Call 2016. In this call research initiatives are stimulated that contribute to the MESA+ long term strategy; strengthening the current multidisciplinary application areas ‘Unconventional electronics’, Early diagnostics & sensing’ and ‘Storage and conversion of renewable energy’, or explore possible new areas in research or application. The beneficiaries of the MESA+ strategic stimulations call were announced at the MESA+ Meeting on 26 September in Kinepolis, Enschede.

Professor dr. Jeroen Cornelissen, Scientific Director MESA+: “With the available resources we aim to invest in new scientific innovations and further interdisciplinary collaborations. This will further strengthen the present application areas or create new ones. In that way we ensure a successful continuation of the outstanding research and infrastructure of the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology."

The annual MESA+ Meeting was held the 26th of September, 2016. Several prizes were awarded during the event, including the Dave Blank Outreach Award which went to Loes Segerink for multiplicity and diversity of her media performances.

The MESA+ Meeting is an annual symposium meant to showcase various projects and programs of the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology. The event’s program included lectures, networking sessions, a poster competition and also aforementioned award. Loes Segerink: the winner of Dave Blank Outreach Award This year’s Dave Blank Outreach Award, consisting of €1.000 to be spend on outreach activities, was given to Loes Segerink. Since the beginning of her PhD research,  Segerink has been a highly communicative researcher and she has actively presented her research - developing a test for the fertility of sperm – in various media. The jury of the Dave Blank Award decided to award the prize to Loes Segerink because of multiplicity and diversity of her media performances, her enthusiasm in these performances and the inspiring manner she draws (inter)national attention to her research, and therefore is a role model for other young researchers.

Herinnert u zich deze nog ? (deel 2)

The basis in the cleanroom from 1996-2000 has stayed the same compared to the present, like the analytical techniques and supplies.There are more methods to make more precise structures on the very small scale, such as the fabrication of nanostructures using Nanoscribe and Nanoimprint.

Herinnert u zich deze nog?

The Soft matter, Fluidics and Interfaces group  uses the TCOater equipment for the deposition of titanium dioxide and zirconia to make catalytic surfaces for the microfluidic devices.

We proudly present...the NANOscribe

The Soft matter, Fluidics and Interfaces group uses the 3D Nanoscribe equipment to make very small 3D structures. With this machine it is possible to make ion selective layers with high precision for sub micrometer structures.  The diameters of the channels need to be in the order of nanometers. The channels have a charge so counter ions are allowed to be there. Ions with the same charge are not allowed.

This week on University of the Netherlands: Dave Blank

Professor and Chief Scientific Ambassador at University of Twente Dave Blank, will appear on the University of the Netherlands show every day this week. In his series of lectures, he will discuss the possibilities offered by nanotechnology. Topics to be discussed include the solar cells of the future, smart materials that allow you to charge your mobile phone while walking and a nano pill that can detect illnesses. 

Professor Rob Lammertink a top researcher at the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology at the University of Twente is awarded a Vici award 2015 for the project ‘Mixing at the boundary’ from the The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). The Vici grant makes it possible to explore experimental phenomena that have not yet been explored in detail. This concerns velocity and concentration profiles on small scales. Explored is what happens at the boundary layer. For more information click here.

Sputterke 21 years

It’s time to celebrate. Sputterke reached the honorable age of 21 years. For humans this means being a grown up, for sputter coaters this would mean retirement. This is not the case for Sputterke, one of the key machines in the cleanroom! In the last 16 years, since we use an electronic logbook, 27000 wafers have been processed with this robust sputter coater. For a research area this is a tremendous amount!

In 1994 the cleanroom started to build a sputter coater with the help of the technical service department of the university. There was a tiny budget only, so most parts were home build or used. In the end of that year the coater was placed into the cleanroom and a new tool for the students was born: Sputterke.

In the years that followed Sputterke was upgraded several times. A load lock for faster loading of the samples, new vacuum pumps, commercial available sputtering guns and finally a replacement of the electronic control by a computer. We made her better, stronger and faster!

Nano Power Pills (placebo peppermints)

"After taking nano power pills your perspective will transcend to the nano size" These and other indications and side effects are described in the user leaflet. The placebo peppermints were used as a souvenir for the 5 yrs NanoLab anniversary They are a real conversation starter about nanotechnology.

Five years of the NanoLab at the University of Twente in ten figures

1.) 120,000 hours of cleanroom research

2.) Over 2000 publications

3.) 594 employees, 47 nationalities

4.) 5 kilogrammes of gold vaporized

5.) 40,000 wafers

For the complete story, click here.

UT spin-off Eurekite teams up with Cottonwood

Eurekite, the first worldwide provider of a new nanotechnology based flexible ceramics, announced today that Cottonwood Euro Technology Funds, an affiliate of the top performing seed stage investor in science based technology start-ups in the US, has closed on founding capital to begin operations in Enschede, The Netherlands.

The technology, initially developed at the Inorganic Materials Science group of MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology (University of Twente), has numerous benefits over current ceramics, in particular that it behaves like paper and can be bent and shaped into any position, and that it is not brittle. Therefore it can be used in many harsh environments without the limitations of currently available to ceramics and also providing unique thermal, electrical, catalytic and filtering characteristics.

More information, click here.

(nano) college volgen op de Zwarte Cross

Was Guus Rijnders op de Zwarte Cross al gitarist in de band Playin’L-Street, (vernoemd naar de Lariksstraat in Lichtenvoorde), nu geeft hij samen met Albert van den Berg en Dave Blank colleges in de Universitent.

"Ze delen hun kennis met het Zwarte Cross publiek. In jip-en-janneketaal doen deze top of the bill professoren uit de doeken waarom ze hun vakgebied zo geweldig vinden. Machtig interessant! En het mooie is: je hoeft helemaal geen professor te zijn om deze colleges te begrijpen!’ aldus Gijs Jolink, mede-eigenaar van de  Feestfabriek. De organisatie wil met ‘de Universitent’ de kloof tussen wetenschap en maatschappij verkleinen.

De nano onderwerpen in deze editie van de Universitent zijn: Prof. Dave Blank “Nano is groots”, Prof. Guus Rijnders “Poep, plas en adem ruiken, daar word je beter van" en Prof. Albert van den Berg “Gezonde chips voor de mens”. Wat wil een mens nog meer!

UT Heroes

European research grant of 2.25 million euros for the development of blood vessels on a chip.UT professor Albert van den Berg has scooped the prestigious ERC Advanced Grant from the European Union for the second time.

‘Onkraakbare’ bankpasjes door nieuwe methode MESA+

Onderzoekers van MESA+ zijn er, in samenwerking met de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, in geslaagd een methode te ontwikkelen die het onmogelijk maakt pasjes zoals creditcards en identiteitsbewijzen te kraken. Zelfs als criminelen over alle informatie beschikken die over het pasje bekend is bij de fabrikant, voorkomt deze methode het kopiëren of nabootsen ervan. De methode heet Quantum-Secure Authentication (QSA) en is veilig door het gebruik van een slimme combinatie van lichtverstrooiing aan nanodeeltjes in de unieke sleutel en kwantumeigenschappen van licht.

‘Het mooie van de methode is dat het geen geheimen kent’, vertelt Pinkse; één van de onderzoekers die aan de wieg stond van deze ontwikkeling. ‘Dat heb je bij pincodes en wachtwoorden wel. Je weet nooit wanneer zo’n geheim uitlekt. Zodra mensen de pincode van bijvoorbeeld je iPad hebben, kunnen ze toegang krijgen. Deze methode kent die kwetsbaarheid niet. De methode kent geen geheimen, maar toch kan niemand daar misbruik van maken.’

Het zal nog een aantal jaren duren voordat de methode ‘commercieel’ beschikbaar is. Maar, er wordt hard aan gewerkt. Mede door de opstartpremie die het project heeft gekregen van technologiestichting STW. Het onderzoek zelf is gepubliceerd als coverartikel van het nieuwe wetenschappelijke vakblad Optica.

Voor meer informatie, klik hier.

The FOM Valorisation Prize 2014 has been awarded to professor Dave Blank and professor Guus Rijnders, both top researchers at the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology at the University of Twente. "They are excellent bridge builders between various scientific disciplines, between science and entrepreneurship, and between science and society", says the jury.


Two female captains on board of the MESA+

From 1 August 2014, Janneke Hoedemaekers will be the new Business Director of the MESA+ Research Institute for Nanotechnology of Twente University. She will succeed Miriam Luizink.

Janneke Hoedemaekers about her new challenge:  “What has always attracted me to Twente University is the practical orientation of science;  searching for solutions that are relevant, also in a social context. 

Dave Blank, Scientific Director at MESA+, is very pleased about Hoedemaekers’ appointment:  “I am very excited that we have found a suitable successor for Miriam Luizink. Janneke is well known in the nano field, in Brussels and at the Ministry of Economic Affairs.

Kitty Nijmeier ambassadeur van het eerste uur!

Als hoogleraar Membrane Science and Technology weet zij boeiend te vertellen over membranen die CO2 afvangen, energie uit zee- en rivierwater, maar ook over membraanontwikkeling voor waterzuivering, drinkwaterbereiding en afvalwaterbehandeling. En dat allemaal in de kroeg in Deventer.

Opening High Tech Factory on 16 May 2013


On Thursday the 16th of May 2013 High Tech Factory officially opened her doors. This opening ceremony marked the start of the production facility High Tech Factory.  Now that the former laboratory complex on the University of Twente campus has undergone a complete transformation, companies established in High Tech Factory have almost 5,000 square metres of cleanroom, laboratories and office space at their disposal.
The state-of-the-art production facility was realized in two phases. The first companies engaged in microsystems and nanotechnology were established here at the end of 2010. In October 2012 the extension that also includes the new central entrance hall became occupied by the new users Micronit, Delta Mask, SmartTip and U-Needle.
During the event all the resident companies demonstrated their skills. Special guest was Wiebe Draijer, former chairman of the Social and Economic Council of the Netherlands (SER). He delivered the University of Twente’s Innovation Lecture that year. Also on the programme was the presentation of the Van den Kroonenberg Prize (for young entrepreneurship) and the Marina van Damme Grant (for female Alumni of the University of Twente).

High Tech Factory’s unique production facility can always count on a great deal of interest. For instance, Henk Kamp, Minister of Economic Affairs, visited the facility and also Hans Biesheuvel, former chairman of the Royal Association MKB-Nederland, was a guest here. After a discussion with several entrepreneurs he said that the visit had been “impressive and inspirational”.

 Information about areas still available for rent(office space, laboratories and cleanroom) is available from Monique Snippers: 053-4892323 or m.a.b.snippers@hightechfactory.com or check out our website: www.hightechfactory.com

MESA + en een minuscule cover voor de VPRO

Ter illustratie van een bijlage over ‘alchemie van de 21ste eeuw’ liet de VPRO Gids een minuscule cover maken met behulp van nanotechnologie. Om een idee te geven van hoe ontzettend klein dingen zijn op nanoschaal, ging een delegatie van de VPRO Gids naar het Mesa+ Nanolab van de Universiteit Twente.

Daar liet het de allerkleinste magazinecover ooit maken, kleiner dan de doorsnee van een menselijke haar. Nanowetenschappers Johnny Sanderink en Henk van Wolferen toverden de nanocover tevoorschijn door kleine hoeveelheden atomen weg te branden uit een plakje silicium, het materiaal waar ook computerchips en halfgeleiders van worden gemaakt. Met het blote oog is de nanobijlage onleesbaar, maar onder een elektronenmicroscoop blijkt het een duidelijke minikopie van het origineel.

Researchers of the MESA+ institute, in collaboration with the company SolMateS, have developed a new type of transistor to reduce the power consumption of microchips.The basic element of modern electronics, namely the transistor, suffers from significant current leakage. By enveloping a transistor with a shell of piezoelectric material, which distorts when voltage is applied, researchers were able to reduce this leakage by a factor of five (compared to a transistor without this material). The research was performed by Buket Kaleli (now with ASML), Ray Hueting and Rob Wolters from the Semiconductor Components group. Staff from SolMateS, a University of Twente spin-off company, applied the piezoelectric layer to the transistor. The research was financially supported by the technology foundation STW.

The SFI research group researches catalytic cleaning of water. Reduction of nitrates and bromates is a big challenge. The group has explored how to carry out the reaction selectively. The project is in collaboration with Catalytic Processes and Materials group of Leon Lefferts. Besides photocatalytic cleaning of water was researched in collaboration with the PhotoCatalytic Synthesis (PCS) group of Guido Mul.

During a thunderstorm on August 23 2011, there were these Nano waterfalls.

NanoLab opened by Prince Willem-Alexander

On 5 November 2010, King Willem-Alexander (who was still a Prince at the time) wrote ‘I declare the MESA+ NanoLab open' on a human hair. Since that day, the largest nanotechnology research facility in the Netherlands has been a reality.

The Powderblast tool  makes holes on the chip where the capillaries need to be attached. This can also be achieved with Adixen equipment.

During the last part of the building of our new Nanolab all users and visitors of the old lab could take a peek in the new lab on the first impression poster.

65 jaar en een eredoctoraat !

Prof. David Reinhoudt, hoogleraar Supramoleculaire Chemie aan de Universiteit Twente, ontvangt een eredoctoraat van de Universitá degli Studi di Parma in Italië. Reinhoudt, tot voor kort ook wetenschappelijk directeur van het MESA+ Instituut voor Nanotechnologie, wordt internationaal geroemd vanwege zijn bijdrage aan de supramoleculaire chemie en nanotechnologie.

Reinhoudt krijgt het eredoctoraat uit handen van zijn erepromotor, prof. Rocco Ungaro. De Universiteit van Parma is één van de oudste universiteiten ter wereld, de historie reikt terug tot de 11de eeuw

Building the NanoLab

In the period of 2007 to 2009 the remarkable buildings NanoLab and Carré werd build on the Campus of the University of Twente. They were part of a big renovation plan of the campus, to provide excellent buildings and facilities; a precondition of the university's 'core business'.

Click this link for the book: the new campus (2011), where you


Foto's: Gijs van Ouwekerk 

Professor Lohse received the NWO Spinoza Prize 2005 for his groundbreaking research on sonoluminescence and his research in the area of heat transport and turbulence.

Lintje voor Piet Bergveld

'Ik heb het een half jaar geheim gehouden', zegt de vrouw van Piet Bergveld terwijl ze in het zaaltje bij MESA+ wacht totdat haar man binnenkomt. 'Niemand heb ik het verteld. Ik dacht: hoe minder mensen het weten, hoe kleiner de kans dat het uitlekt.' En dat op 1 april 2003. Burgemeester Mans speldt het lintje op de bodywarmer van de kersverse Ridder in de Orde van de Nederlandse Leeuw. Zijn vrouw: 'Ik durfde niet te zeggen dat hij een jasje aan moest doen. Dat zou opvallen.'

Mans neemt de rijke carrière van Bergveld door. Hij was vanaf de beginjaren van de UT een aanjager van het biomedisch-technologisch onderzoek. Zijn passie heeft altijd gelegen in techniek die iets kan betekenen voor mens en gezondheid. Hij geniet grote bekendheid door zijn uitvinding van de ISFET-sensor, een sensor voor chemische en biomedische toepassingen. Ook stond hij aan de wieg van het huidige MESA+ research instituut.

'Piet Bergveld is een exponent van de ondernemende universiteit avant la lettre', zo stond het in de voordracht voor de koninklijke onderscheiding. En daar is geen woord van gelogen.

Tom Aarnink (41), technoloog bij Mesa+, heeft in de twintig jaar dat hij voor de UT werkt de micro-elektronica zien veranderen in nano-elektronica. 'In de eerste jaren', vertelt Aarnink, 'richtte EL zich op het ontwikkelen van complete CMOS-transistoren, zeg maar halfgeleidende schakelaars in chips. Maar de ontwikkelingen gaan zo snel, dat een faculteit de race met de industrie niet kan bijbenen. Om die transistoren steeds kleiner te kunnen maken, zul je om de paar jaar volledig nieuwe, geavanceerde apparatuur moeten aanschaffen. Dat kost miljoenen.' En dus stapte Aarninks leerstoel, halfgeleidercomponenten, over op 'processtaponderzoek'. 'We concentreren ons op één facet van de transistor: het isolerend siliciumoxidelaagje. Dat proberen we zo dun mogelijk te maken. We naderen de atoomdikte.' 'We', daarmee bedoelt Aarnink de 'academen' van Mesa+ (promovendi en wetenschappelijke staf) en de ondersteunende technologen van de cleanroom, het hightechlab met een minimum aan stofdeeltjes per kubieke meter (foto). Tot die laatste groep behoort hijzelf. 'Het zou bijzonder inefficiënt zijn als elke nieuwe promovendus die hier komt het instrumentarium in de cleanroom zelf moet leren gebruiken. Wij technici hebben het volledig in de vingers, dus helpen we ze met het uitvoeren van experimenten.' Sinds enige jaren is Aarnink betrokken bij een ontwikkelingsproject in Vietnam. 'In Hanoi staat een hoogwaardige hightechfabriek met een cleanroon die wij hebben aangeleverd.' Aarnink verbleef de afgelopen drie jaar periodes van twee maanden in de Vietnamese hoofdstad. 'Hanoi is interessant, Aziatisch. Heel leuk om te leren kennen. Communistisch? Zeker. Maar daar merken wij niets van: de regering steunt het project.'

David Reinhoudt the Dutch pioneer of supramolecular chemistry

After many years of highly influential work in this field, in the past 15 years his attention has shifted towards applications in nanoscience and -technology. He has achieved enormous success in this area, as witnessed by his Simon Stevin Mastership Award of the Dutch Applied Science Foundation in 1998. He has participated in numerous collaborations working on single-molecule photonics and electronics and microfluidics, and is one of The Netherlands' most productive scientists with more than 800 refereed publications, books, and patents.

Het interview in UT nieuws met professor Fluitman bij zijn afscheid van MESA op 15 januari 1999.

In 1997, Mesa+ began to play a role for Rob Lammertink at this time he was a PhD student. The Mesa+ gave him the impression that momentum is generated, things are done together and people are connected with each other, which work good and strong.

His Royal Highness Prince Claus opens mesa Twente

When Prince Claus opened 'MESA Twente' - the forerunner to the NanoLab - in 1990, the talk was of micrometres: one-thousandth of a millimetre.

Opening Cleanroom door Prins Claus

Op 12 december 1990 werd de cleanroom geopend door Prins Claus. Het publiek bestaat onder andere uit medewerkers van de faculteit Electrotechniek.

Op 11 mei 1984 is het zo ver: het S&A lab wordt geopend op vloer 6 van EL/TN (het Huidige Hogenkamp). Het laboratorium van 280 m2 is een verlengstuk van de vakgroep laboratoria en wordt dus gebruikt door medewerkers en studenten van de vakgroepen Instrumentele elektronica en Elektronische Ontwerpkunde, Bio-Informatica, Transduktietechniek, Materiaalkunde van Transducenten.

De faciliteiten zijn:

  • Een dunne film laboratorium voor het aanbrengen van dunne metaal- of oxide lagen d.m.v. opdampen of sputteren. 
  • Een fotolithografie faciliteit voor het definiëren van microstructuren.
  • Een eenvoudige MOS-lijn voor het maken van sensoren in silicium technologie.


Technische Hogeschool Twente is voornemens een S&A (Sensors & Actuators) lab op te richten. Er zijn geen gelden aanwezig, maar een commissie bestaande uit Smits, Fluitman, Lambeck en Bergveld gaat aan de slag om onderzoek op het onderwerp te initiëren. Onderstaand document laat zien dat de oprichting van S&A lab is vastgelegd.