Course descriptions programme 2nd year (not yet in OSIRIS)

Draft from Study guide PSTS 2013-2014

11. The second year (new style)

Here you find the descriptions of the courses that are specific for the profiles. Below that will follow the courses in the second year that are taken by students in each profile: the MasterLabs 1 and 2, the Brief Internship PSTS which is optional, and the Final Thesis PSTS.

11.1 Profile Technology and the Human Being

Profile

Term 1

Term 2

Block 1A

Block 1B

Block 2A

Block 2B

Profile 1

Technology and the Human Being

Philosophical Anthropology and Human-Technology Relations

5 EC

Philosophy of Mind and Body and Technology

5 EC

Academic Profile

Master’s Thesis 30 EC

MasterLab 2 (EC’s: part of the Master’s thesis – with all students)

Or

Professional profile
Internship 10 EC

Master’s Thesis 20 EC
MasterLab 2 (EC’s: part of the Master’s thesis – with all students)

Shaping Technology and Use

5 EC

Elective taken from another profile

5 EC

Elective taken from another profile

5 EC

MasterLab 1

5 EC

Course name

Philosophical Anthropology and Human-Technology Relations

Course code

191612660

Participating programme

PSTS

Phase

M2, 1A

Credits

5.0

Language

English

Obligatory/ elective

Obligatory

Requirements for Entrance

At least 40 EC from M1.

Teaching staff

Prof. dr. P.P. Verbeek

Study material

Study materials include scientific articles and PPT slides.

Subjects, theories and models

This course acquaints students with the state of the art in philosophical-anthropological approaches in philosophy of technology. The course focuses on the relations between human beings and technologies, ranging from behavior-steering technology to human enhancement technology, and on ways to assess and improve the quality of these relations. The course develops three lines. Students will be introduced to the basic discussions in these three lines. After that, they choose one of the three lines to get acquainted with state of the art literature and to write a paper. The lines are: (1) Material Morality. By mediating human experiences and practices, technologies have come to play an important role in our moral actions and decisions. (2) Technology and the Limits of Humanity. Technological developments have started to interfere explicitly with human nature. Biotechnologies, brain implants, and enhancement technologies make it possible to reshape humanity in various ways. (3) Art, Technology, and Culture. Technologies help to organize the sensory repertoire of human beings: they disclose new ways of experiencing reality. The ways in which artists experiment with such mediations, therefore, form a highly interesting point of application for the philosophy of contemporary art. Also, this line includes the cultural dimension of human-technology relations and the mediation aspects involved in technology transfer between cultures.

Teaching methods

There will be 6 lectures of 4 hours. First, there will be 3 meetings on the three lines of the course. After this, there will be an individual start meeting for writing a paper, a progress meeting in which students present a draft paper, and a plenary final meeting in which students present the final result of their work.

Assessment

The assessment is based on an individual paper assignment (100% of the mark), the quality of participation in meetings, the presentations and the brief summaries to be written about the study material.

Learning objectives

This course connects to the final qualifications K1-2, K5-6, S1-4, S6-8 of the programme, according to the following eight learning objectives:

At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in:

1.

the state of the art in philosophical-anthropological approaches in philosophy of technology.

2.

the ethics and anthropology of human enhancement.

3.

the relations between moral agency and technological artifacts.

4.

the relations between art and technology.

At the end of the course the student is able to:

1.

write a research paper on a philosophical-anthropological discussion in the philosophy of technology.

2.

analyze and assess the philosophical-anthropological implications of a technological development.

3.

present a research paper on a philosophical-anthropological discussion in the philosophy of technology.

4.

find his/her way in philosophical-anthropological literature.

Course name

Shaping Technology and Use

Course code

191622630

Participating programme

PSTS

Phase

M2, 1A

Credits

5.0

Language

English

Obligatory/ elective

Obligatory

Requirements for Entrance

At least 40 EC from M1.

Teaching staff

Dr. E.C.J. van Oost

Study material

Study materials include scientific articles.

Subjects, theories and models

The central question of this course is: how do human actors through interactions with technological artefacts not only mould their daily life but also (re)shape the technology itself. Users have transcended their status of “passive consumers”. Current phenomena like Web 2.0, Open Source, Wikepedia, etc. are all examples of active, producing users. This active agency in shaping technology in daily activities blurs traditional boundaries between design and use. In the course students will get acquainted with four interrelated scientific fields that all contribute to understanding the changing design-use relations. These are: (1) STS, with special focus on Actor Network Theory: Sociology of translation in networks is elaborated. The script analysis allows for granting the agency of the artefacts themselves. Attachment is a second phenomenon that is analyzed in terms of ANT. (2) Media Studies: In the domestication theory the focus of analysis shifts to the agency of users in the appropriation of technological artefacts. (3) Innovation Studies conceptualizes the dynamics of user/user community innovation. (4) Sociology: Giddens’ structuration theory is integrated with STS insights into a conceptual framing of “Duality of Technology”.

A substantial part of this course encompasses the design and execution of a small empirical research project. The students will learn all steps involved in a research design (research question – theoretical framework – choice of method and data – operationalisation of theoretical concepts – gathering data - interpreting data in theoretical terms – conclusion). The core theories are Actor-Network Theory, Sociology of Translation, Domestication Theory, Structuration Theory and User-innovators perspective. The recent developments that integrate STS with media and innovation studies are studied and discussed in class. The small research project also uses recent research.

Teaching methods

During 7 seminars of 2 hours the theory will be discussed. Active participation of students is required. Students have to read texts I advance and prepare discussions on the content.

Assessment

The assessment is based on two home assignments (together 25% of the mark) and one final assignment (75% of the mark). In the first home assignment students have to apply theoretical concepts to their own empirical experiences. In the second one students must compare and discuss theoretical concepts. The final assignment has the aim to acquaint students with theory informed empirical research. Active participation in class is obligatory

Learning objectives

This course connects to the final qualifications K1, K3-K6, S1-S4, S6-8 of the programme, according to the following three learning objectives:

At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in:

1.

theoretical STS-perspectives on processes of co-shaping of design and use of technological artefacts.

2.

Qualitative methods of empirical research.

At the end of the course the student is able to:

3.

combine theoretical perspectives with empirical data (from a first experience of conducting empirical research).

4.

To write a coherent academic paper based on theoretically informed empirical research

Course name

Philosophy of Mind, Body and Technology

Course code

 

Participating programme

PSTS

Phase

M2, 1B

Credits

5.0

Language

English

Obligatory/ elective

Obligatory

Requirements for Entrance

At least 40 EC from M1.

Teaching staff

Prof. dr. C. Aydin

Study material

Reader

Subjects, theories and models

This course acquaints students with current theories and approaches to the relations between mind, body, and technology. (A) The theme of technology and the body will take Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy of the body as a starting point. From there, it will move to Canguilhem’s theory of Organism versus Machine, Don Ihde’s theory of ‘Bodies in Technology’, and Vivian Sobchak’s work on techno-bodies. Central questions are: how can the relations between bodies and technology be conceptualized? What role can the body play in future philosophy of technology? (B) Philosophy of mind studies the nature of the mind, mental events, mental functions, mental properties, consciousness and their relationship to the physical body, particularly the brain. Questions are raises such as: What do we mean by mind? How do we attribute mentality? How are mental and physical properties related? What is consciousness? An overview of these themes will be offered as a general framework. To address the theme of mind and technology, the course will focus on Andy Clark’s theory of embodied embedded cognition, which links technology and the philosophy of mind. In that context also internalist and externalist approaches to mind, as well as the notion of introspection, will be discussed. After studying the central elements of Clark’s ‘Natural Born Cyborgs’, the focus will be on its relevance for philosophy of technology, and its reception by philosophers of technology (e.g. Selinger). (C) Finally, the course will bring these lines together by addressing issues of identity and technology, focusing on brain technologies and prosthetic technologies in relation to people’s self-understanding and sense of personal identity.

Teaching methods

The course has a seminar setting. There will be 7 sessions of 4 hours. In these sessions, students will discuss texts they have studied before the meetings. After an introductory meeting, there will be 4 meetings about technology, mind, and body, followed by a meeting where students present paper outlines and a meeting where they present and peer review draft papers.

Assessment

The assessment is based on an individual paper assignment (100% of the mark), the quality of participation in meetings, the presentations and the brief summaries to be written about the study material.

Learning objectives

This course connects to the final qualifications K1-2, K5-6, S1-4, S6-8 according to the following five learning objectives:

At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in:

1.

philosophical approaches to technology and the body

2.

philosophical approaches to technology and the human mind

3.

the relations between technology and identity

4.

contemporary analyses of the relations between mind, body, and technology

At the end of the course the student is able to:

5.

write a research paper on a philosophical problem regarding the relations between mind, body, and technology

11.2 Profile Technology and Values

Profile

Term 1

Term 2

Block 1A

Block 1B

Block 2A

Block 2B

Profile 2

Technology and Values

Technology and the Quality of Life

5 EC

Assessment of Emerging Technologies

5 EC

Academic Profile

Master’s Thesis 30 EC

MasterLab 2 (EC’s: part of the Master’s thesis – with all students)

Or

Professional profile
Internship 10 EC

Master’s Thesis 20 EC
MasterLab 2 (EC’s: part of the Master’s thesis – with all students)

Technology, Globalization and the Environment

5 EC

Elective taken from another profile

5 EC

Elective taken from another profile

5 EC

MasterLab 1

5 EC

Course name

Technology and the Quality of Life

Course code

191612670

Participating programme

PSTS

Phase

M2, 1A

Credits

5.0

Language

English

Obligatory/ elective

Obligatory

Requirements for Entrance

 

Teaching staff

Dr. J.H Søraker; prof.dr. P.A.E. Brey

Study material

Scientific articles posted on blackboard

Subjects, theories and models

This course introduces the philosophy and ethics of technology in terms of the good life (also known as quality of life or well-being). The question of what a good life consists of has always been one of the major questions of philosophy. It is also a prominent question in the philosophy of technology, as many evaluations of technology ultimately centre around the question whether particular technologies make our lives better. This course examines philosophical theories of the good life, philosophical theories of technology in relation to the good life. The course also addresses empirical research on subjective well-being, and its applicability to technology assessment. The first part of the course focuses on philosophical theories of the good life, including hedonism, desire-satisfactionism, and objectivist theories of the good life, as well as corresponding research in the social sciences. The second part then relates these to technology, and discusses particular technologies, such as information technology, sustainable technology and medical technology in relation to the quality of life. The aims of the course are both to introduce current theories of the good life and to gain training in applying these theories in the analysis of particular technologies and technological practices.

Teaching methods

4 interactive lectures of 4 hours, then individual supervision.

Assessment

The assessment is based on participation in class (30% of the final mark) and an individual paper assignment (70% of the mark).

Learning objectives

This course connects to the final qualifications K1-2, K5-6, S1-4, S6-8 of the programme, according to the following seven learning objectives:

At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in:

1.

philosophical theories of the good life.

2.

philosophical theories of technology in relation to the good life.

3.

philosophical studies of particular technologies in relation to the good life.

4.

philosophical theories of the place of conceptions of the good life in politics.

5.

Empirical research on subjective well-being          

At the end of the course the student is able to:

1.

apply philosophical theories of the good life in the analysis of technologies and technological practices.

2.

evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of existing theories of the good life and technology.

3.

understand and apply empirical research on subjective well-being

4.

utilize philosophical theories of technology and the good life to develop a theoretical position of one's own.

Course name

Technology, Globalization and the Environment

Course code

 

Participating programme

PSTS

Phase

M2, 1A

Credits

5.0

Language

English

Obligatory/ elective

Obligatory

Requirements for Entrance

 

Teaching staff

Dr. M. Coeckelbergh

Study material

Study materials include scientific articles and PPT slides. All will be made available via Blackboard.

Subjects, theories and models

This course invites students to reflect on problems regarding the relation between technologies and globalization. Particular attention will be paid to electronic information and communication technologies and to specific topics related to geography, society, politics, energy, animals, and especially environment. We will focus on questions such as: Does globalization lead to what McLuhan called a “global village”? Do new ICTs “shrink” the world, and in what sense? Do they imply the “death of geography”, or does place and space still matter? If so, how? What kind of “global society”, “global community” or “global culture” is created, if any? Is the network society a “society”? How do the new technologies influence how we think about cultural difference? Do new media lead us to reconsider the duties we have to strangers? Should animals be part of the global moral community? Is technological and economic globalization necessarily followed by moral and social globalization? How do new technologies shape global finance? Do new electronic military technologies change international politics and warfare in the 21st century? What is the role of technology in coping with global climate change? Are new energy technologies such as smart grids helping to build a more sustainable world? How can ICTs be developed in a way that aids sustainability? How do they shape the way we frame environmental problems? What are conceptual and empirical relations between nature, technology, and environment? The students will be encouraged to engage with these questions by using philosophical methods (conceptual analysis, argumentation) and by using and producing interdisciplinary research.

Teaching methods

Lectures, seminars

Assessment

The assessment is based on presentations and group participation (has to be sufficient) an individual paper assignment : an essay (graded).

Learning objectives

This course connects to the final qualifications K1, K2, K6 and S1-5 and S8 of the programme, according to the following learning objectives:

At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in

1. problems concerning the relation between technologies and globalization

2. specific topics in this domain such as technology and environmental problems

At the end of the course the student is able to…

1. analyze the problems concerning the relation between technology and globalization

2. identify and analyze particular problems in this domain

3. analyze the literature in this domain

4. analyze arguments in particular debates in this domain

5. formulate and argue one's his/her own position with regard to a particular issue

5. perform original research in this field, or make at least a serious effort to do so

6. communicate research to colleagues

Course name

Assessment of Emerging Technologies

Course code

 

Participating programme

PSTS

Phase

M2, 1B

Credits

5.0

Language

English

Obligatory/ elective

Obligatory

Requirements for Entrance

 

Teaching staff

Dr. M. Boenink, Dr. K. Konrad

Study material

Study materials include scientific articles and PPT slides. All will be made available via Blackboard.

Subjects, theories and models

This course focuses on the complexities of anticipating, normatively assessing and shaping technologies in development. In ethics of technology, governance theories as well as technology assessment, it is now commonplace to state that the course of technology development should be anticipated and that its desirability should be assessed early on. If technology development progresses, it tends to become too entrenched to change its direction. This means, however, that early anticipation and assessment have to take place at a stage when uncertainties abound. Such uncertainties affect both the ‘doing’ (innovation processes) and the assessing of technologies in development. Both assessment and action build on expectations, rather than robust knowledge. Understanding patterns of expectation-building, for instance social dynamics of expectations, but also patterns of assessment, such as patterns of moral argumentation, are useful to understand de-facto assessment as well as to design appropriate methods for dedicated ethical assessment.

The course invites students to critically reflect on the possibilities and difficulties of anticipating and evaluating the desirability of emerging technologies, and to study and develop methods for early anticipation and evaluation that take the surrounding uncertainties into account. The precise setup of the course varies each year, since it is adjusted to ongoing research by several staff members.

Teaching methods

Lectures, seminars

Attendance is obligatory.

Assessment

The assessment is based on group participation (has to be sufficient), assignments (30 % of the final grade) and an individual paper assignment (70% of the final grade).

Learning objectives

This course connects to the final qualifications K4-6 and S4-9 of the programme, according to the following nine learning objectives:

At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in

1.

the uncertainties in processes of technology development, as well as assessment of those processes and their products

2.

the state of the art in theory and practice of anticipating and (ethically) assessing emerging technologies, as well as their philosophical underpinning3. philosophical and empirical research strategies to improve the quality of both theoretical approaches and practices of anticipating and assessing emerging technologies

At the end of the course the student is able to

3.

analyze the social dynamics of expectations and the patterns of moral argumentation concerning emerging technologies

4.

to diagnose the uncertainties in actual innovation processes

5.

critically compare and evaluate different methods to anticipate and ethically assess emerging technologies

6.

formulate and argue one's own position with regard to the anticipation and assessment of technologies in development

7.

to articulate and defend one's own position with regard to methods for anticipating and assessing technologies in development

8.

communicate research and solutions to colleagues as well as professionals from other subject areas.

9.

to generate learning processes from the interaction.

11.3 Profile Dynamics of Science, Technology and Society

Profile

Term 1

Term 2

Block 1A

Block 1B

Block 2A

Block 2B

Profile 3

Dynamics of Science, Technology and Society

Philosophy of Science and Technology Relations

5 EC

Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Science, Technology and Society

5 EC

Academic Profile

Master’s Thesis 30 EC

MasterLab 2 (EC’s: part of the Master’s thesis – with all students)

Or

Professional profile
Internship 10 EC

Master’s Thesis 20 EC
MasterLab 2 (EC’s: part of the Master’s thesis – with all students)

Dynamics and Governance of Socio-Technical Change

5 EC

Elective taken from another profile

5 EC

Elective taken from another profile

5 EC

MasterLab 1

5 EC

Course name

Philosophy of Science and Technology Relations

Course code

 

Participating programme

PSTS

Phase/ Study period

M2, 1A

Credits

5.0

Language

English

Obligatory/ elective

Obligatory

Teaching staff

Prof. dr. ir. Mieke Boon

Study material

Academic articles (provided on Blackboard) and presentations in the current field of the philosophy of science in practice. Additionally, students are expected to search for relevant literature themselves (in particular for the final essay).

Subjects, theories and models

To understand the dynamics of science, technology and society, we need to know what scientific practices are like. This course aims at a better understanding of the internal dynamics of scientific research in the context of technological applications, with a focus on epistemological issues. The approach of this course is a Capita Selecta in the so-called Philosophy of Science in Practice. The philosophy of science in practice (PSP) is a relatively new branch on the tree of the philosophy of science. Some salient aspects of its general approach are:

1.

PSP is concerned with not only the acquisition and validation of knowledge, but also its use. Its concern is not only about how pre-existing knowledge gets applied to practical ends, but also about how knowledge itself is fundamentally shaped by its intended use. PSP aims to build meaningful bridges between the philosophy of science and the newer fields of philosophy of technology and philosophy of medicine; and provide fresh perspectives for the latter fields.

2.

It emphasizes how human artifacts, such as conceptual models and laboratory instruments, mediate between theories and the world. It seeks to elucidate the role that these artifacts play in the shaping of scientific practice.

3.

Its view of scientific practice must not be distorted by lopsided attention to certain areas of science. The traditional focus on fundamental physics is supplemented by attention to other fields such as economics and other social/human sciences, the engineering sciences, and the medical sciences.

4.

In its methodology, it is crucial to have a productive interaction between philosophical reasoning and a study of actual scientific practices, past and present. This provides a strong rationale for history-and-philosophy of science as an integrated discipline, and also for inviting the participation of practicing scientists, engineers and policymakers.

The attractiveness of this new and prolific field is its openness to new philosophical ideas and approaches. Moreover, philosophy of science in practice aims at results that are not only relevant for the philosophical discipline itself, but also for a better understanding these practices from the perspectives of scientists, engineers, policy-makers and many others.

Teaching methods

During 7 seminars of 4 hours, the articles are discussed. Students prepare by making assignments, reading each other’s assignments and making well-informed comments. The assignments are a step-by-step-development of the final essay.

Examination and assessment

The assessment is based on active involvement in the sessions and collective discussions (has to be sufficient), interim assignments (have to be sufficient) and a final essay (100% of the mark).

Learning objectives

This course connects to the final qualifications K1-6. S4-9 of the programme, according to the following learning objectives:

Content:

-

A broad overview in the new field called Philosophy of Science in Practice, both regarding its philosophical topics and methodologies.

-

Philosophical and practical understanding of the epistemological relationship(s) between scientific research and technological development.

Skills:

At the end of this course, the student is able to:

a)

Read texts of both traditional and contemporary authors in the philosophy of science.

b)

Analyze the structure and arguments of a philosophical text.

c)

Reconstruct the presuppositions made in a philosophical text.

d)

Formulate problems of scientific practices, and to translate them in a philosophical research project.

Course name

Dynamics and Governance of Socio-Technical Change

Course code

 

Participating programme

PSTS

Phase/ Study period

M2, 1A

Credits

5.0

Language

English

Obligatory/ elective

Obligatory

Teaching staff

Dr. K.E. Konrad

Study material

Academic articles (provided on Blackboard) and presentations. Additionally, students are expected to search for relevant literature themselves (in particular for the final essay).

Subjects, theories and models

Understanding the patterns and dynamics of socio-technical change is crucial for diagnosis of ongoing developments as well as for governance and innovation. In this course we focus on the co-evolutionary dynamics of technology and society based on an understanding of technology as embedded in specific organizational, institutional and social arrangements, such as particular ways of using, producing, innovating and regulating a technology.

We will reflect on the implications of such a mutual dependence of technological and societal structures – for the regular ‘working’ of socio-technical systems, for innovation and socio-technical change and for possibilities and limitations of governing socio-technical change. ‘Governance’ implies that we are not primarily interested in government and policy action, but that heterogeneous societal actors, such as firms, public organisations, citizens and social movements have a role in modulating change as well.

In this course, we will read and discuss literature on the dynamics and patterns of socio-technical change, focusing in particular on approaches drawing on insights from STS and evolutionary theories (e.g. socio-technical systems and regimes, multi-level dynamics). Furthermore, we will discuss possibilities and limitations for governing these processes and learn about concrete governance approaches and their application that have been developed on the basis of these insights, such as Transition Management, Strategic Niche Management or Constructive Technology Assessment.

Teaching methods

During 8 seminars of 2 hours, concepts and empirical cases are discussed. Discussions are prepared by the students via reading, assignments and partly presentations.

Examination and assessment

The assessment is based on delivery of assignments (graded at least as sufficient) and an individual paper assignment (graded with half grades; quality of assignments may lead to rounding up or down of grades.)

Learning objectives

This course connects to the final qualifications K1, K3, K4, K6, S1-S5, S7 of the programme, according to the following learning objectives:

At the end of the course the student:

1.

knows concepts and theories from science, technology and innovation studies addressing socio-technical relations and dynamics

2.

knows concepts of governance, in particular governance of technology

3.

knows concrete governance approaches developed on the basis of these concepts and empirical examples

4.

is able to reflect on the merits and shortcomings of concepts / approaches.

5.

is able to apply concepts to concrete cases.

6.

is able to develop an analytical / research question and treat it in a structured way drawing on appropriate sources in the form of a small essay.

Course name

Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Science, Technology and Society

Course code

 

Participating programme

PSTS

Phase/ Study period

M2, 1B

Credits

5.0

Language

English

Obligatory/ elective

Obligatory

Teaching staff

Prof. dr. L.L. Roberts

Study material

Study materials (available on blackboard) include primary source material, scientific articles and PPT slides.

Subjects, theories and models

The dynamics of science and technology are situated in time and space. Their movement through these dimensions informs both their practical character and development, whether at the local and short-term level of a laboratory or the extensive and long-term level of global travel and exchange. This course takes the spatio-temporal geography of science, technology and society seriously: not just as providing a context in which science and technology take place, but as both a constituting element of their dynamics and an evolving consequence thereof. Topics covered will include:

·

the ways in which geography and development over time are generally treated in philosophical, sociological and historical studies of science and technology - and the analytical consequences thereof;

·

the role of a laboratory's internal geography (its architecture and furnishings) and 'external' setting in the production of knowledge;

·

the long-term development of science as a mutually constitutive element of global history, with a special focus on imperialism and globalization

·

the history and future of innovation in global context, with a critical examination of '(post-) industrial revolutions'

Teaching methods

During 7 seminars of 4 hours, students and instructor work together to interpret and discuss weekly reading assignments in relation to weekly themes. Students prepare by reading course material, making notes in keeping with guiding questions provided by instructor. Individual students are assigned the task of serving as recording secretary for each session. Notes are then revised in consultation with instructor to form analytical record of the session (the weekly 'protocol'), which is distributed the following week. Students write three interpretive essays based on reading material and in-class discussions.

Examination and assessment

The assessment is based on active involvement in the sessions and collective discussions (has to be sufficient), written protocol, three written essays.

Learning objectives

This course connects to the final qualifications K1, 3,4,6, S1-S4,6,7,9 of the programme, according to the following seven learning objectives:

At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in:

·

how authors frame their analyses of science and technology in spatial and temporal terms and the impact that this has on their analyses;

·

science and technology dynamics from a long-term perspective that isn't bounded by a Euro-centric perspective;

·

the mutually-constitutive roles played by science and technology in global history.

At the end of the course the student is able to:

1.

analyze academic texts - whether philosophical, sociological or historical in nature - and determine its thesis, as well as the presuppositions on which it builds.

2.

transform lecture and discussion notes into an analytical presentation.

3.

interpretatively relate various texts in keeping with an overriding theme.

4.

write an analytically coherent essay, built around an explicitly stated thesis.

11.4 Courses in each profile

Course name

MasterLab 1

Course code

201300085

Participating programme

PSTS

Phase/ Study period

M2, 1A & 1B

Credits

5.0

Language

English

Obligatory/ elective

Obligatory

Teaching staff

Brey, Verbeek, Konrad

Study material

Academic articles and cases (provided on Blackboard), student presentations and participating in research group activities.

Subjects, theories and models

The main goal of the course is to guide and coach students in their research activities, first by assisting them in writing a research proposal (Masterlab 1), and later by providing an infrastructure for (peer) coaching and training in connection to their graduation projects (follow-up course Masterlab 2). The course starts with seminars / workshops dedicated at particular topics related to research skills and supporting the search for a topic, and continues with seminars where draft proposals are presented and discussed.

Teaching methods

Seminar setting: The emphasis in the first semester is on the second quarter. In the first quarter, general themes regarding doing research will be discussed; the second quarter systematically works toward writing a thesis proposal.

Examination and assessment

The assessment is based on active involvement in the sessions and collective discussions (has to be sufficient), a case study and a thesis proposal (presentation and paper).

Learning objectives

This course connects to the final qualifications K4, K5, K6, S4-S9 of the programme, according to the following learning objectives:

At the end of the course the student is able to conduct own project within a profile of PSTS, which has to result in a thesis proposal.

At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in the relation between topics within his/her profile

Course name

MasterLab 2

Course code

 

Participating programme

PSTS

Phase/ Study period

M2, 1A & 2B

Credits

 

Language

English

Obligatory/ elective

Obligatory

Teaching staff

Verbeek, Soraker, Konrad

Study material

Concepts of theses and presentations of fellow students; participating in research group activities.

Subjects, theories and models

Master’s theses meetings (one afternoon in two weeks)

(EC’s: is part of the Master’s thesis)

Teaching methods

seminar setting

Examination and assessment

The assessment is based on active involvement in the sessions and collective discussions (has to be sufficient).

Learning objectives

This course connects to the final qualifications K4, K5, K6, S4-S10 of the programme, according to the following learning objectives:

At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in:

1.

a broader framework in which he/she can localize his/her thesis

At the end of the course the student is able to:

1.

communicate his/her research steps and results to colleagues

2.

reflect on the appropriateness of chosen research steps, possible alternatives, and change course, if necessary

3.

provide appropriate feedback to colleagues

link his/her thesis work to application areas within or outside academia

Course name

Brief Internship PSTS

Course code

201300090

Participating programme

PSTS

Phase/ Study period

M2, 2B

Credits

10.0

Language

English

Obligatory/ elective

Elective

Requirements for entrance

At least 40 EC completed from M1; Registration at the Student Mobility System (see https://webapps.utwente.nl/srs/nl/srsservlet ) Courses in block 2.1 are attended and at least proceeding. Students programme in the specialization is approved and registered in Osiris.

Prior knowledge for

Final Thesis Project (20 EC)

Teaching staff

Staff of departments Steps and Philosophy (monitoring and assessment) Prof.dr. P.A.E. Brey, Prf dr. P.P.C.C. Verbeek, dr. K.E. Konrad (coordinators of profiles)

Study material

Final Thesis Project Guide PSTS

Subjects, theories and models

Students who opt for a professional career, may choose for a brief internship. The Brief Internship is meant to get acquainted with a future professional field. It is recommended for students who have no working field experience from their prior education or CV. The brief Internship is followed by a short Final thesis project of 20.

Teaching methods

The internship lasts about two months within a knowledge institute or a production company in a relevant field. The PSTS programme has contact with several candidate organizations; the student may also contact other organizations him/herself. During the internship the student has to work on an assignment at the level of a starting academic. This assignment preferably is related to the intended subject of the Master’s thesis. The internship is preferably done four days a week, at a Dutch organization,.

The internship is supervised by an internal (university) supervisor (envisaged thesis supervisor) and an external supervisor who together assess and grade the students’ achievement.

The internal (university) supervisor will be involved at least at four moments of the internship: (1) when formulating the assignment; (2) after the first week of the internship, to check if everything is running smoothly; (3) after the first half of the internship, to see if adaptations should be made to the original plan; (4) after the internship, to discuss and grade the internship report.

Examination and assessment

Report and interview

Learning objectives

This course connects to all final qualifications of the program K1-6, S1-10.

Students may choose for a brief internship in their 2nd year. The internship is meant to get acquainted with a future professional field. It is recommended for students who have no working field experience from their prior education or CV. The internship is followed by a short Final Thesis Project of 20 EC.

Course name

Master’s thesis PSTS

Course code

201300089

Participating programme

PSTS (STS)

Phase/ Study period

M, 2 A

Credits

20.0

Language

English

Obligatory/ elective

Obligatory

Requirements for entrance

All courses in the programme completed and Brief Internship STS 201300090

Teaching staff

Staff from the departments STePS and Philosophy (supervisors and assessors).

Study material

Study materials depend on the topic of the project.

Subjects, theories and models

Students write a Master’s thesis of 40-60 pages, supervised by one of the staff-members. Next to this daily supervision a graduation committee is installed that meets at least two times with the student. The exam will include an oral defense of the thesis.

Teaching methods

Students work at individual project, they will receive individual bi-weekly supervision. In addition, they are obliged to participate in monthly Master’s thesis seminars in which they can exchange experiences with and present results to fellow students.

Examination and assessment

The assessment is based on a thesis, an oral exam and/or a public colloquium (thesis will be informally graded; this grade can be adjusted on basis of oral exam and/or colloquium).

Learning objectives

This course connects to all final qualifications of the program K1-6, S1-10, according to the following five learning objectives:
 
At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in:

1.

specialist knowledge in one sector of technological specialisation within the philosophy of technology and technical sciences.    


At the end of the course the student is able to…

1.

conduct scientific research in the domain of philosophy of technology and technical sciences wherein philosophical methods are used and whereby the further development of knowledge and skills in a technical field or one of the physical sciences is demonstrated.

2.

formulate and argue one's own position in the domain of philosophy of technology

3.

communicate research and solutions to colleagues as well as professionals from other subject areas.  

At the end of the course the student has:

1.

 reflective capacity pertaining to one's own work, selecting or altering course, and the ability to translate learning trajectories into the development of more general knowledge and methods.

Course name

Master’s thesis PSTS

Course code

201300088

Participating programme

PSTS (STS)

Phase/ Study period

M, 2 A

Credits

30.0

Language

English

Obligatory/ elective

Obligatory

Requirements for entrance

All courses in the programme are completed.

Teaching staff

Staff from the departments STePS and Philosophy (supervisors and assessors).

Study material

Study materials depend on the topic of the project.

Subjects, theories and models

Students write a Master’s thesis of 40-60 pages, supervised by one of the staff-members. Next to this daily supervision a graduation committee is installed that meets at least two times with the student. The exam will include an oral defense of the thesis.

Teaching methods

Students work at individual project, they will receive individual bi-weekly supervision. In addition, they are obliged to participate in monthly Master’s thesis seminars in which they can exchange experiences with and present results to fellow students.

Examination and assessment

The assessment is based on a thesis, an oral exam and/or a public colloquium (thesis will be informally graded; this grade can be adjusted on basis of oral exam and/or colloquium).

Learning objectives

This course connects to all final qualifications of the program K1-6, S1-10, according to the following five learning objectives:
 
At the end of the course the student has knowledge of or insight in:

2.

specialist knowledge in one sector of technological specialisation within the philosophy of technology and technical sciences.    


At the end of the course the student is able to…

4.

conduct scientific research in the domain of philosophy of technology and technical sciences wherein philosophical methods are used and whereby the further development of knowledge and skills in a technical field or one of the physical sciences is demonstrated.

5.

formulate and argue one's own position in the domain of philosophy of technology

6.

communicate research and solutions to colleagues as well as professionals from other subject areas.  

At the end of the course the student has:

2.

 reflective capacity pertaining to one's own work, selecting or altering course, and the ability to translate learning trajectories into the development of more general knowledge and methods.