Agendapunten

UR 09-041 Creative Technology Part. B











Bachelor of Creative Technology




Information dossier in support of the application for the New Studies Test



Part B: The study units description and staff CV’s





Written by:


Dr. Z.M. Ruttkay

Chair of the Creative Technology Programme Development Group

Dr. A. Eliëns

Member of the Creative Technology Programme Development Group

Dr. G.F. van der Hoeven

Creative Technology Programme Educational Director




Version: 2.0


19 November 2008



Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science



The Information dossier in support of the application for the New Undergraduate Studies Test consists of the following volumes:

Part A: The programme description

The major document, discussing the motivation, the content and formal aspects of the proposed bachelor programme Creative Technology.

References from the text are to be found in the accompanying parts.

Part B: Study units descriptions and staff CVs

A supplementary volume, containing the description for each study unit and the short cv of key academic staff members.

Part C: Related initiatives

A supplementary volume, containing examples, related initiatives, discussion of the implications of the IIP/CREATE (in volume C), references to further resources.

Part D: IIP/CREATE

IIP/CREATE is the abbreviation of The Strategic Research Agenda of the ICT Innovation Platform Creative Industry, published in May, 2008.

Because of its relevance, we add the full document as an appendix. The report is available in digital format from the http://iipcreate.com site, on page:

http://83.98.156.43/~iipCreative Technology/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/iip_Creative Technology_book_sra.pdf



The present report is available from the Creative Technology wiki page:

http://janus.cs.utwente.nl:8000/twiki/bin/view/CT/WebHome



Acknowledgment

The report is the result of the joint effort of a half-year work of the Creative Technology Programme Committee, defining all aspects of this novel bachelor programme and flashing out study units from different disciplines. The authors acknowledge the contribution of the following people:

Prof.dr.ir. J. van Amerongen (EWI)

Dr.ir. G.M. Bonnema (CTW)

Ir. W. Eggink (CTW)

Prof.dr.ir. B.J. Geurts (EWI)

Dr. A.H. Mader (EWI)

Ir. J. Scholten (EWI)

Bas Olde Hampsink (Saxion Hogescholen, Academie Toegepaste kunst en techniek) acted as an appreciated external advisor of the working group.

Finally, we are indebted for the support and advice from several colleagues at EWI and at other faculties, as well as from outside the UT, particularly from ArtEZ AKI (ArtEZ AKI, The Enschede Academy of Visual Arts); TU/e (Eindhoven), HvK (Utrecht), V2_ (Rotterdam) and the Waag Society (Amsterdam).

Summary


This report proposes a new three year university bachelor programme Creative Technology to be offered by the University of Twente.

The Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science of the university will be responsible for the programme, but other faculties, notably the faculties of Engineering Technology and Behavioural Sciences are involved in programme development and teaching.

General motivation for this proposal is found in the development of ICT and its impact on the job market and the national ICT strategy in relation to the creative industry.

Another and equally important motivation is the need to attract more students (in particular also female students) to technology and engineering, and to educate a type of engineer who is interested, competent and skilled in both artistic and scientific domains, motivated to invent new (technological) devices for the well-being of people, and driven by curiosity and the joy of the process of creation itself.

The Strategic Research Agenda of the ICT Innovation Platform Creative Industry, published in May, 2008, comparison with other educational programmes in the same or an adjacent field, and an analysis of professional scenarios for people with a Creative Technology degree underpin domain specific requirements for this university (WO) bachelor programme.

The programme has four major components: Technology, Creativity, Design and Business. Technology covers the basics of Mathematics and Computer Science, as well as the themes New Media and Smart Technology (including the basics of Electrical Engineering). Students make a choice between the two themes as a track of specialisation.

In the instructional concept the stimulus for creativity in study units Creative Applications and Creative Explorations is central. Students will build their portfolio, and are encouraged to start companies. The programme is a mixture of disciplinary courses and project-based study units. The study load of the entire programme is 180 EC (in both tracks).

Students with any VWO profile may be enrolled. The intake procedure is elaborate. Every potential student who applies is thoroughly screened and receives an individual advice about the chances of success. This approach is chosen to meet the challenge of attracting more students and to educate the “new” type of engineer as envisioned by the programme. The quality of this education will gain from the presence of students with all kinds of backgrounds.

An intake of at least 60 students per year is expected. Market research shows an even higher potential.

The university and the faculty have awarded considerable budgets to support this initiative. Plans to create appropriate facilities for the programme are in the initial phases of execution. Part of the budget is used to strengthen the university’s design group (in cooperation with Industrial Engineering), and to help lecturers prepare for the new tasks this programme sets.

There is outside support for the initiative. The dean of the faculty has an advisory board of representatives from industry and other universities, which assists in all matters concerning the programme: defining the goals, thinking about the instructional concept and core content, finding guest lecturers for subjects and so on.TABLE OF CONTENTS


1 STUDY UNITS DESCRIPTIONS 7

CE1 Creative Exploration of Structures 8

CE2 Creative Explorations in Art, Science and Technology 10

CA1 We create identity 12

CA2 Living and working tomorrow 14

CA3 Have Fun and Play! 16

CA4 Ambient Screens 18

CA5 Hybrid Worlds 20

DE1 Sketching for CreaTe 22

DE2 Graphic design 24

DE3 Designing in context 26

DE4 Human Factors 28

DE5 3d modelling 30

DE6 Advanced graphic design 32

DE7 Digital content creation tools 34

MA1 Motion and Modelling 36

MA2 Signals and Systems 38

MA3 Statistics and probability 40

MA4 Strategies and Protocols 42

MA5 Queues and logistics 44

CS1 Introduction to Computer Science 46

CS2 Programming for Creative Technology 48

CS3 Programming with Structures 50

CS4 Data-driven applications 52

NM1 Web Technology 54

NM2 Interactive Visualization 56

NM3 Web2.0 Mashups 58

NM4 Virtual Environments 60

NM5 Game Development 62

ST1 Smart Environments 64

ST2 Dynamical Systems 66

ST3 Control Systems 68

ST4 Wireless Communication Systems 70

ST5 Introduction to Electronics 72

ST6 Sensors 74

BI1 Design marketing 76

BI2 Business management 78

2 STAFF CVS 80





1Study units descriptions



On the following pages the standard description of each study unit is given, with content, teaching methods, prerequisites and goals and attainment targets.


The authors – who were, in many cases, not members of the curriculum development group – are indicated.


This catalogue-like description lists courses according to topics.

The list starts with the CE (Creative Explorations) and CA (Creative Applications) study units where multidisciplinary and creative approach are essential to invent applications.

The CA and CE units use disciplines from earlier courses. The list continues with the (common) design courses, followed by the basic technological courses.

The list continues with specific courses for the NM and ST tracks, and ends with the business courses.


Note that this list in itself does not give insight to the structure of the curriculum. This, together with learning goals and teaching methodology are discussed in Part A.


The course descriptions are presented in a standard format, which stresses the subjects to be treated, the formal goals to be reached, and the relationships of the course with other courses. To help the reader understand the various levels of understanding and competence the course developer has in mind, we use the following terminology:

1.awareness – theoretical knowledge / hear say

2.familiarity – experience and (limited) knowledge

3.fluency – basic skill/knowledge, sufficient for elementary application

4.full literacy – application of skill/knowledge in problem context

CE1 Creative Exploration of Structures

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Creative Exploration of Structures

Date: 20.05.2008

Author: Zsófia Ruttkay

Version: 1.0



Course name

Creative Exploration of Structures

Study load

2 EC



Semester

2



Contents

In this course structures will be investigated mentally and visually. Understanding structures is essential to explore different problem-solving methods and to create variations of designs and visualization by hand or by computer. During the course students will explore different topics, providing insight into and hands-on experience with abstract and visual representations of structures and problem-solving patterns, providing food for the mind and the eyes.

The following topics will be handled:

1.Can you prove it? – prove methods

2.The painter as a mathematician – Linear perspective and anamorphoses

3.Infinity and beyond – the Cantor method and Hilbert’s paradox of The Grand Hotel

4.Attractive chaos – intuitive notion of ‘ordered’ and ‘irregular’ patterns, randomness and Perlin noise

5.Paths explored – the notion of graph, Hamilton circle, travelling salesman problem, search and complexity.

6.Visual patterns for design – structure of design patterns will be investigated.



Prerequisites

Some programming skill (e.g. Flash) can be exploited, but not a must.



Goals and attainment targets

Discovering the structure behind a real-life problem, natural phenomena or artistic design is the first and essential step to model it. The course has the following major goals:

1.stimulate creative and analytical thinking, with attention for the abstraction and reasoning,

2.provide a structured approach to visual design;

3.develop a positive and active attitude for ‘problem solving’, with attention to aesthetics and philosophical context

4.provide a broad view on mathematics and a general understanding of its essential vehicles, and replace bias with joy and curiosity.

As the course basically aims at developing attitudes, ways of looking at and dealing with a problems, the major attainment targets fall under this category. The ‘knowledge’ and ‘skills’ are seen as vehicles to develop certain attitudes.


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Creative Exploration of Structures



Place in curriculum

Introductory course for all students, it is relevant for further study providing basis and training for modelling and problem solving, independent explorations, argumentation, coupling concepts/formal representation and visualization, relevant for NM, ST and DE. In approach and scope complementary to MA courses.



Application area, motivating examples

The attitude and skills to identify abstract structures behind concrete problems or visual patterns is essential for physical phenomena (dealt with in, e.g. coursesST2, MA1-2,) and to create designs. For instance, how to describe the spiral patterns in a sunflower? Why does it appear? How to draw similar patterns?



Teaching methods

Each week a single topic will be dealt with, in the form of (interactive) course and individual or group work assignments identified by the teacher. These assignments serve to gain hands-on experience with different topics.

In addition, everybody is to complete 2 individual exploratory assignments:

   1) a short essay about a topic of choice, a little bit of theory
   2) a mini-project, on paper and/or computer illustrating or elaborating on one of the topics treated (in a practical/design way).

The course starts and ends with a session of discussion and reflections on maths, videotaped for further comparison. Assessment will be done on the basis of involvement in the course, the course assignments, and the two individual exploratory assignments.



Nr of participants

20. Sub-groups (e.g. for assignments) will be formed in a way that students with different interest and (mathematical, programming) skills get mixed.



Special facilities

Computers, Visual programming languages Procession and Flash. Possibly making real-life models from paper or other material. Presentation and video recording facilities.





CE2 Creative Explorations in Art, Science and Technology


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Creative Explorations in Art, Science and Technology

Date: 20.05.2008

Author: Zsófia Ruttkay

Version: 1.0



Course name

Creative Explorations in Art, Science and Technology

Study load

2 EC



Semester

3-4



Contents

This ‘course’ is a slot, providing space to encourage and acknowledge student’s own explorations on (the intersection of) art, science and technology. Students may:

-give a mini-seminar on a technological tool or application they have seen or learnt to master,

-reflect on an exhibition or festival they had been to.

-participate in or initiate some artistic activity(e.g. creating a sculpture or a laser show, may be with an artist in resident),

-provide entry to some reputed festival

-compile and present an illustrated survey on history of e.g. computer animation, organize debate on some ethical issues or a creative idea.

In general, students may use these credits to explore topics beyond the curriculum, and share the result of their exploration with the rest of the students (and staff).




Prerequisites

None.



Goals and attainment targets

Students further develop an open and curious attitude, learn (and share) some knowledge complementary to the curriculum. They will practice argumentation and presentation as well as group work.

In some cases, the result of their work (e.g. a piece of art) will be presented in public.


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Creative Explorations in Art, Science and Technology



Place in curriculum

This ‘open contingent’ is available in both streams, thought year 2. It is up to the student when and how to earn the credits, by what form of activity, may be several smaller ones. CE2 complements the other courses concerning knowledge and format of activity. It also allows students to develop own interests.




Application area, motivating examples

Technology and its (artistic) application are the result of a historical development. The Renaissance man, like Leonardo da Vinci, was informed in science, practicing arts and interested in the philosophical aspects of the technological and scientific developments. A similar attitude is timely in our days too. The huge body of digitally available information, and tools to process them, make it feasible to explore intersections of arts, science and technology, travel back (and forth) in time.




Teaching methods

The possible categories of activities are outlined. Then it is up to the students to propose activities, which are to be approved and scheduled by the supervisor. The result (talk, installation, …) will be evaluated together with the (student) audience and credited by the supervisor.




Nr of participants

One or more student per task, depending on the activity.




Special facilities

Cannot be set in advance. Some audio and video devices, 3d printer or lab to make something by hand may be needed for some tasks. Others may require visit to exhibitions or festivals.





CA1 We create identity


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: We Create Identity

Date: 25/4/08

Author: A. Eliëns

Version: 1.0



Course name

We Create Identity

Study load

3 EC



Semester

1



Contents

The goal of the course, which will take the structure of a group project, is to set a new group of students to work, to learn about the topics of creative technology, to get to know each other and the staff, and to find ways of expressing their interests and viewpoints in a variety of ways, including blogs, (interactive) videos, and wikis, using commonly available Web 2.0 community services.


Equally important is that students discover the means that are at their disposal to communicate and document their work in individual portfolios, using basic tools for web development and content creation.



Prerequisites

admission to curriculum



Goals and attainment targets

The course aims at providing

- awareness of personal motivation(s) and the societal context of the curriculum

- familiarity with the concepts and topics of creative technology

- fluency with standard social network tools and content-creation

- full literacy in motivating what options are available to express opinions, technical information and knowledge

Students are expected to be well-motivated, and will be stimulated to find creative ways of expressing themselves.



Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

We Create Identity



Place in curriculum

Introductory course for all students, just after arrival.



Application area, motivating examples

There are various way to create identity, from social networks and communicate personal and professional information using the web

Students are encouraged to explore these means of expression, and select those that fit their needs, in discussing with supervising staff.



Teaching methods

This first CA course will primarily be an exercise in self-organisation, with an important goal to create coherence in a group of new students, with a variety of backgrounds. The course will be organized as a series of lectures and workshops.

In the lectures topics in creative technology will be presented by selected staff members. The workshops will deal with planning, supervision of team work, and creative sessions in which the options for expressing opinions, technical information and knowledge will be discussed. :

Additional instruction may be needed to clarify issues of communication and presentation, and to prepare students for the creation of an individual (digital) portfolio.


Feedback will be given in the workshops, and by assessing the products as made available online. Peer reviews will not only be used for feedback, but will also form part of the procedure of assessment and grading.

Grading takes place by assessing the work in a presentation session, where students present and discuss their work and contributions to the group project..



Nr of participants

Max 35



Special facilities

computer lab, meeting room(s) & presentation facilities, as well as suitable software tools




CA2 Living and working tomorrow


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Living and Working Tomorrow

Date: 20080513

Author: Maarten Bonnema

Version: 1.0



Course name

Living and Working Tomorrow

Study load

6 EC.



Semester

1-2



Contents

In this creative application, the student explores in a group, the application of several new technologies in a future living or working situation. This requires:

an investigation into the new technologies,

generation of several application scenarios of these technologies,

development of concepts of products and/or services that apply to one of the generated scenarios,

creation of a prototype,

evaluation of the prototype.

In project-lectures the relevant tools are presented. Also, a basic course in writing a report is given.




Prerequisites

An eager mind

Courses DE2, MA1, CS1 and ST1





Goals and attainment targets

Upon completion the student is aware of characteristics of new technologies and is able to identify opportunities for exploitation of a technology. In particular the possibilities of cooperating sensors and actuators to create “smart behaviour” of the system will be explored. Also, the student is familiar with working in a group, organizing the work, and writing a legible report.






Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)




Course name

Living and Working Tomorrow



Place in curriculum

The contents of the courses DE2, MA1, CS1and ST1 are used to complete the assignment. The assignment can be seen as integrating the topics of these courses, and to apply them in a realistic problem.




Application area, motivating examples

As the theme is living and working tomorrow, typical assignments are:

High-tech office assistant (a robot that assists in office chores like getting coffee, copying, providing supplies, having a chat here and there)

The assisting home (a home with added technology to aid elderly and handicapped people to live autonomously longer, while the health condition is carefully monitored)

Kindergarten tomorrow (providing toddlers with interactive toys that stimulate their development, monitor their health, and test their progress)




Teaching methods

The largest part of the time will be spent in group-work. Lectures will be given at appropriate moments during the project, about at relevant topics for that moment.

Also application of new technologies, like the ones in ST1, are presented in lectures. On the one side to stimulate students’ creativity, on the other hand to provide extra information on the technology.

Students have to present their work as a group, write a report and creating a display for their design.




Nr of participants

Group size about 6 students. Multiple groups work in parallel as competitors.





Special facilities

Group-work area.






CA3 Have Fun and Play!

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Have Fun and Play!

Date: 25/4/08

Author: A. Eliëns

Version: 1.0



Course name

Have Fun and Play!

Study load

6 EC



Semester

2



Contents

The course is meant as an integrative project, which combines the various elements introduced in the first year of creative technology, where students experience the need for planning and project-management. Topics include:

* application of creative technology elements

* explore combination smart technology & new media

* development interactive game play

* write business & communication plan

* reflection on societal context of media & smart system deployment

Although acquisition of the actual theme of the project must be done by senior staff, students will be expected to take an active part in the selection of theme(s) and target(s), and developing the final application(s) or product(s).



Prerequisites

CA1&2, CS1&2, NM1&2, ST1&2, MA1&2, DE1&2



Goals and attainment targets

The integrative nature of the CA3 project will contribute to more firmly establishing skills, and deepening students’ knowledge of smart systems and interactive media applications. The course aims at providing

- awareness of business models and the societal context of projects

- familiarity with requirements analysis, planning, concept-development and project-management

- fluency in problem-finding and ways of generating ideas

- full literacy in applying learned skills to tackle problems in system development

Students are expected to be well-motivated, and will be stimulated in problem-finding and the exploration of creative solutions.

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Have Fun and Play!



Place in curriculum

Integrative course for end of first year.



Application area, motivating examples

Each year a preparatory investigation must be done, preferably by a group consisting of staff members and students, in close contact with potential industrial or societal partners, to select one or more potential theme(s) and topic(s) that may serve as a challenging target.




Teaching methods

The structure of CA3 project will be determined by the students themselves. The role of the staff will primarily be to safeguard the project from (beginners) mistakes, and to encourage critical reflections on decisions and potential consequences. To avoid potential misunderstandings, this is not total freedom, but rather a strictly supervised approach, where established standards of project-management will not serve as a prescription, but rather to give feedback and control initiatives originally formulated and proposed by (groups of) students.


Feedback will be given in workshop sessions, and by assessing the products as made available online. Peer reviews will not only be used for feedback, but will also form part of the procedure of assessment and grading.

Grading takes place by assessing the work in a presentation session, where students present and discuss their work and contributions to the group project.



Nr of participants

20-30



Special facilities

Contacts with potential industrial or societal partners must be established, which may require additional technical support.


CA4 Ambient Screens

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Ambient Screen(s)

Date: 23/5/08

Author: A. Eliëns

Version: 1.0



Course name

Ambient Screen(s)

Study load

6 EC



Semester

3



Contents

The course is meant as an integrative project, with a special focus on the ubiquitous availability of screens outside the workplace and personal home computer. Projects in this course concern finding creative solutions for interaction with this multitude of screen displays.

Online reference(s):

-http://smart-its.org

-http://idisplays.info

-http://www.deutsche-telekom-laboratories.de/~rohs/wikeye

Remark: If possible the project(s) will be executed in the University’s VR facility, the T-Xchange-Cell: http://www.txchange.nl

with the goal of developing scenario-based serious games.



Prerequisites

Completion of all first year courses



Goals and attainment targets

The integrative nature of the CA5 project will contribute to find useful and interesting ways to combine smart technology and new media in novel applications.. The course aims at providing

- awareness of privacy and security issues when using public displays

- familiarity with developing concepts to facilitate interaction with non-computer screens

- fluency in content production workflow and project management

- full literacy in applying learned skills to tackle problems in system and content development

Students are expected to be well-motivated, and will be stimulated in problem-finding and the exploration of creative solutions..


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Ambient Screen(s)



Place in curriculum

Integrative course in second year.



Application area, motivating examples

Off-computer screen displays include big urban screens on public squares, as well as medium size screens in shopping malls and lifts, as well as small screens that come with (mobile) gadgets or built-in consoles in buses or airplanes. To allow for intelligent interaction these screens may moreover be equipped with sensors and bluetooth.

Interesting solutions are being developed, see online reference9s), that connect these screens with for example mobile gadgets, to support new patterns of shopping, tourism and game playing.




Teaching methods

The course will offer a selection of topics and projects, from which students may choose on the basis of their interest and specialization. Students will be encouraged to work in small, 4-5 person groups, of an interdisciplinary character,

And will be closely supervised in all stages of the product-development life-cycle.


Feedback will be given in workshop sessions, and by assessing the products as made available online. Peer reviews will not only be used for feedback, but will also form part of the procedure of assessment and grading.

Grading takes place by assessing the work in a presentation session, where students present and discuss their work and contributions to the group project..



Nr of participants




Special facilities

Contacts with potential industrial or societal partners must be established, to acquire interesting projects with a sufficient degree of relevance and technical interest.




CA5 Hybrid Worlds

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Hybrid World(s)

Date: 23/5/08

Author: A. Eliëns

Version: 1.0



Course name

Hybrid World(s)

Study load

6 EC



Semester

4



Contents

The course is meant as an integrative project, with a special focus on the relation between the real world and the virtual world, not only in a metaphorical sense, but rather as expressed by the notion of the internet of things.

Topics addressed include RFID identification, geo-tagging, and other sensors in combination with online monitoring, logistics. Students are encouraged to design smart systems where (wireless) sensors and feedback control, realized in microcomputers play a major role. Such systems could be autonomous robots (e.g. robotics vacuum cleaners and so on), traffic control systems, but could also be partly in the real and partly in the virtual world. Dependent on specialisation and interest students are encouraged to explore issues of smart systems, logistics and traffic management, or playful applications in an urban context. In this context the phrase hybrid may also be understood as multicultural.

Online reference(s):

-http://www.mediamatic.net/artefact-13370-en.html

-http://www.mediamatic.net/artefact-33888-en.html



Prerequisites

Completion of all first year courses, as well as most advanced courses of year two: CS3-4, MA3-5, ST3-5, NM3-5



Goals and attainment targets

The integrative nature of the CA4 project will contribute to find useful and interesting ways to combine smart technology and new media in novel applications.. The course aims at providing

- awareness of privacy and security issues in hybrid applications

- familiarity with developing concepts relating the real to virtual world(s)

- fluency in workflow and project management

- full literacy in applying learned skills to tackle problems in system development

Students are expected to be well-motivated, and will be stimulated in problem-finding and the exploration of creative solutions.

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Hybrid World(s)



Place in curriculum

Integrative course at the end second year.



Application area, motivating examples

The internet of things is coming into existence with RFID and GPS as key identification and localization techniques. Advanced process management systems are required that integrate planning, coordination, and control of all logistic business processes and activities in the supply chain network to deliver good consumer value at low cost to the supply chain as a whole while satisfying requirements of other stakeholders in the supply chain. Similar systems although different in character may be used to organize festivals and for playing games in an urban environment, where such technology is available for reasons of security and information.




Teaching methods

The course will offer a selection of topics and projects, from which students may choose on the basis of their interest and specialization. Students will be encouraged to work in small, 4-5 person groups, of an interdisciplinary character,

And will be closely supervised in all stages of the product-development life-cycle.



Feedback will be given in workshop sessions, and by assessing the products as made available online. Peer reviews will not only be used for feedback, but will also form part of the procedure of assessment and grading.

Grading takes place by assessing the work in a presentation session, where students present and discuss their work and contributions to the group project..



Nr of participants




Special facilities

Contacts with potential industrial or societal partners must be established, to acquire interesting projects with a sufficient degree of relevance and technical interest.




DE1 Sketching for CreaTe

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Sketching for Create

Date: 16.05.2008

Author: Wouter Eggink

Version: 1.0



Course name

Sketching for Create

Study load

2 EC



Semester

1



Contents

In this course basic skills will be developed for the expression of ideas and concepts through sketching. With practical lab training the basic principles of perspective drawing are taught. Topics:

-Perspective and drawing-rules for shapes and environments

-Learning to look and see the construction of the 3d world

-Design drawing as a tool in the early stage of product development

-Drawing as a communication tool

-Drawing as an aid for idea-development



Prerequisites

No entry level required. With the principles and techniques applied, everybody is able to make drawings. In general the methods are constructive and have not so much reference to art-like drawing at VWO.



Goals and attainment targets

The objective of the course is to provide students with the ability to express themselves (ideas, concepts, designs) visually. In a clear, direct and fast way.

After the completion of the course the students are familiar with:

-The principles of perspective drawing

-The basic drawing-constructions of 3d shapes and environments

-Making clear and understandable drawings

-Making concept sketches and explanatory drawings in short time

-The use of drawing as a tool for idea-generation and development in the design process


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Sketching for Create



Place in curriculum

This course is a basic skill developer at the beginning of the curriculum. The ability to express, communicate and develop ideas and concepts will be obligatory in all design related assignments. Especially in the Creative Applications throughout the entire Bachelor Curriculum. Moreover these basic skills will have to be trained and applied in further assignments throughout the curriculum in order to attend the desired end-goal of having sketching as a familiar, incorporated tool in the design processes.




Application area, motivating examples

The ability to express, communicate and develop ideas and concepts will be relevant in all design related assignments. The students have to be able to “get the ideas out of the head onto the paper (or whatever)”.




Teaching methods

Lab training and exercises. Every session will start with a short presentation on backgrounds and principles, followed by instructions for exercises in the class. The students will practice with supervision of the staff. Extra exercises will be given as homework and results will be evaluated in next classes. Assessment with the portfolio.



Nr of participants

One class can contain up to 35 students. From 25 participants on, the assistance of a second staff member (student-assistant) is desirable.



Special facilities

For the exercise classes the students have to have a proper desk space for their drawing material. Instructional presentations require a beamer.








DE2 Graphic design

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Graphic Design

Date: 14.03.2008

Author: Wouter Eggink

Version: 1.0



Course name

Graphic Design

Study load

2 EC



Semester

1



Contents

Basics of graphic design. Understanding and application of design principles in two-dimensions. Topics to be addressed in theory and practical exercises;

Fonts; type, style and readability

Layout and grid

Application of color

Symbols pictograms and icons

Hierarchy and structure in information

Relationship between text and visual information.



Prerequisites

No particular entry knowledge required




Goals and attainment targets

This course is a part of the design applications line, where the students obtain the ability to design attractive solutions. After completion of the course the students are familiar with the basics of graphic design and can apply the principles when developing products and services with a visual information component. In the first half of the course the theory will be central, in the second half the creative aspect of the design will be attended.



Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Graphic Design



Place in curriculum

This course is a basic course in two dimensional design principles. Together with the other design applications this course is a key-driver in the ability of the students to design attractive solutions for target users. It is fuelling the creative applications throughout the rest of the curriculum. The course will also provide a basis for the design of interactive applications and user interfaces




Application area, motivating examples

In this course the students will gain experience with the design within two dimensions. This can either be printed on paper, projected on the wall or on a computer screen. In all cases the presentation of information in an effective and pleasant way will be essential.




Teaching methods

Instructional lectures with assignments. In between results will be evaluated in class. Assessment with the portfolio.




Nr of participants

Number of participants up to 40 students per class



Special facilities

A laptop and internet connection are mandatory. A digital camera or the use of a digital camera at disposal can be helpful for some assignments. Graphic design software like Adobe Illustrator or InDesign is desirable.





DE3 Designing in context


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Designing in Context

Date: 14.04.2008

Author: Wouter Eggink

Version:1.0



Course name

Designing in Context

Study load

2 EC



Semester

2



Contents

In this course the students will attain basic understanding of principles and methods for designing products and services within context. New developments are not isolated, but will exist in a context characterized by the environment, users, stakeholders, society, fashion, trends et cetera. The participants will understand the relevance of this context and practice with the identification and visualisation of this context for design purposes.



Prerequisites

No particular entry knowledge required. Some basic skill with digital camera’s and image-software like Adobe Photoshop is helpful. A healthy interest in society, trends, news and fashion is compulsory.



Goals and attainment targets

This course is a part of the design applications line, where the students obtain the ability to design attractive solutions. Especially with a specific environment and target group in mind.

By completing this course the students obtain understanding of the basic principles of designing attractive solutions;

-Mirroring principle, harmony, colour coding, Gestalt and meaning, semantics and others

The students are familiar with;

-The use of visuals and collages to indicate and document specific trends, target groups and environments

-The use of visuals and collages to express desired feelings and emotions

-The use of visuals and collages to express a desired design solution


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Designing in Context



Place in curriculum

This is a starting course for the design application line. The principles of designing in context are particularly meant to be applied within the creative application assignments. Here they are one of the basis elements for designing attractive solutions that will please the users of a product or service (along with required functionality and ergonomic usability). Also they will be mandatory for the commercial success of future products.



Application area, motivating examples

Every artefact has to function within his surroundings. Apart from the physical constraints also trends, fashion, design, desirability, society and status play an important role.

For example when designing a web-application aiming at encouraging teens to communicate about their hobbies, it is important to address the style and interest of the teens. The teens would not like the website to be attractive to their parents. On the other hand the website should look inviting.



Teaching methods

Instructional lectures with assignments. Group work and individual work. In between results will be discussed in the classes. Assessment with the portfolio.




Nr of participants

Number of participants up to 40 students per class



Special facilities

A laptop and internet connection are mandatory. A digital camera or the use of a digital camera at disposal for some assignments. Visual manipulation software like Adobe Photoshop is desirable.





DE4 Human Factors

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Human Factors

Date: 16.05.2008

Author: Wouter Eggink

Version: 1.0



Course name

Human Factors

Study load

3 EC



Semester

2



Contents

The course provides basic insight in the delimiters for designing products and services that users understand.

Components of the course;

-Evaluating and redesigning an existing user interface design from user perspective (this can be either an example from an existing interactive application, or student’s own work from previous creative applications)

-Making a relevant List of Requirements for your own design from user perspective.

-Designing a user interface from Human Factors guidelines.

-Evaluating your design with usability testing.



Prerequisites

No particular entry level required.



Goals and attainment targets

When designing products or services that will be used by people it is important that the principles of operation, navigation or functioning of the solution are understood by the user. In order to be able to design a successful application it is important to know simple methods for fitting the product to the users needs, wishes and understanding.

After the completion of the course the students will be;

-Familiar with the Human Engineering Analysis method for obtaining insight in user needs and wishes

-Aware of the possibilities for designing user interfaces with the user in mind.

-Aware of several guidelines for designing usable interfaces

-Aware of the methods, principles and limitations of usability testing

-Aware of the possibilities of using user-centred research for improving your design.


1.1.1Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Human Factors



Place in curriculum

This course is a basic course in Human Factors design principles. The course will encourage the students to take the user in mind when designing new products or services. Together with the design application courses (DE1, DE2 and DE3) it will contribute to product solutions that will not only function properly, but people also like to use.

This course will be given parallel to the Creative Application ‘Living and Working Tomorrow’(CA 2) so the assignments of the course will be applicable to the design problem of the Creative Application.




Application area, motivating examples

In this course the students will gain some experience in designing solutions from user perspective. This is important because everybody knows an example of products that are very hard to operate, products that will not work until you have studied a 100 pages of user manual or products that simply do not fulfil the users needs.



Teaching methods

Instructional lectures with 3 assignments. In between results will be evaluated in class. Assessment with the portfolio.



Nr of participants

Number of participants up to 80 students per class. The assignments are done in groups of four students.



Special facilities

No particular facilities necessary but the students require a laptop to be able to work on their assignments in class






DE5 3d modelling

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: 3d modelling

Date: 16.05.2008

Author: Wouter Eggink

Version: 1.0



Course name

3d modelling

Study load

2 EC



Semester

3



Contents

In this course basic skills will be developed for the virtual modelling of geometry and shapes. With practical lab training the basic principles of 3d space are taught. Topics:

-Building geometry

-Solid and surface modelling

-Virtual space



Prerequisites

DE1




Goals and attainment targets

The objective of the course is to provide students with the ability to build virtual geometry and environments. After completion of the course the students will be familiar with;

-Building geometry (basic shapes, single- and double curved, Nurbs, Booleans et cetera)

-Solid and surface modelling possibilities and limitations

-Geometry description protocols (IGES, STL et cetera) and interfacing





Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

3d modelling



Place in curriculum

This course is a basic course in making virtual geometry and environments. It provides skills for application in New Media solutions (Games, 3d interfaces) and skills for modelling/prototyping of Smart Technology solutions (Smart Environments). The course will focus on actual geometry-building skills and techniques, where NM courses on Virtual Environments will address the topic from a technology and realization perspective.



Application area, motivating examples

Modelling for making virtual environments is a basic element in making three dimensional computer applications. User interfaces can benefit from three dimensional space and a lot of games are based on a three dimensional environment. Also a three dimensional environment is the best representative of real life. In this way virtual environments can act as a model or prototype environment for Smart Technology solutions.




Teaching methods

Lab training and exercises. Every session will start with a short presentation on backgrounds and principles, followed by instructions for exercises in the class. The students will practice with supervision of the staff. Extra exercises will be given as homework and results will be evaluated in next classes. Assessment with the portfolio.




Nr of participants

One class can contain up to 40 students.




Special facilities

Appropriate 3D-modelling software (to be determined)





DE6 Advanced graphic design


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Advanced Graphic Design

Date: 16.05.2008

Author: Wouter Eggink

Version:1.0



Course name

Advanced Graphic Design

Study load

2 EC



Semester

4



Contents

Advanced application of graphic design. Understanding and application of design principles in two-dimensions, including sound and motion. This course will further develop the topics of Graphic Design (DE3), extended with the following topics;

-Exploration of visual styles and Personality

-Level of abstraction in visual information

-Movement in visual information

-Application of sound in enhancing visual information



Prerequisites

DE3, CA1, NM1 and NM2.



Goals and attainment targets

This course is a part of the design applications line, where the students obtain the ability to design attractive solutions.

After completion of the course the students have received fluency with the basics of graphic design and can apply the principles when developing products and services with a visual information component. On top of that the students are familiar with;

-The application of sound and movement in graphic design

-Level of abstraction in visual information

And the students explored their own style and personality within this area.



Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Advanced Graphic Design



Place in curriculum

This course is a broadening of the skills in two-dimensional design. Together with the other design applications this course is a key-driver in the ability of the students to design attractive solutions for target users. It is fuelling the creative applications throughout the rest of the curriculum and encourages the students to develop their own style, personality and creativity.

In general this course will emphasize on the visual aesthetic appearance of information, while NM courses deal with this topic from technology- and realization perspective.




Application area, motivating examples

In this course the students will deepen their experience with the design within two dimensions. This can either be printed on paper, projected on the wall or on a computer screen. In all cases the presentation of information in an effective and pleasant way will be essential.




Teaching methods

Instructional lectures with assignments. In between results will be evaluated in class. Assessment with the portfolio.




Nr of participants

Number of participants up to 40 students per class




Special facilities

A laptop and internet connection are mandatory. A digital camera or the use of a digital camera at disposal can be helpful for some assignments. Graphic design software like Adobe Illustrator or InDesign is desirable.






DE7 Digital content creation tools


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Digital Content Creation Tools

Date: 24/5/08

Author: A. Eliëns

Version: 1.0



Course name

Digital Content Creation Tools

Study load

2 EC



Semester

4



Contents

The course will cover a range of (standard) digital content creation tools, including tools for graphic design, such as Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, tools for movie post-production, such as Adobe Premiere and AfterEffects, and tools for 3D modelling and rendering, including Maya, 3D Studio Max and Blender. Topics addressed in the course include: forms of representation and exchange formats, interoperability and the place of the various tools in the workflow/process of content creation.

Online reference(s):

-http://www.adobe.com/products

-http://usa.autodesk.com

-http://www.collada.org



Prerequisites

Completion of all first year courses



Goals and attainment targets

The course aims at providing

- awareness of digital content creation work flow and high-level exchange standards (in particular COLLADA).

- familiarity with issues of exchange and interoperability

- fluency in matching tools and content creation tasks

- full literacy with a selection of digital content creation tools (minimally Photoshop)

Students are expected to be aesthetically inclined, and will be stimulated to explore tools to increase their productivity and aesthetic satisfaction.

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Digital Content Creation Tools



Place in curriculum

The course provides supplementary skills and competences for NM and DE courses.



Application area, motivating examples

Digital Content Creation is a vital element in all areas of (web) publishing, game development, and product design.

It is also an area of substantial revenues in the creative industries. Both private and public education provide education in digital content creation, although usually at the lower or middle professional levels. In academic environment, the focus should not only be on content development per se, but rather on issues of interoperability, tool selection and workflow, to optimally support creative processes.




Teaching methods

The course will be organized around lectures, which will briefly introduce the tools, and in which issues of interoperability and data exchange will be discussed. The assignments will consist of a series of basic exercises and a final exercise

In which the students are required to develop a moderately complex task of digital content creation.

Regular feedback will be given in classroom sessions where students presenting their work as well as via online comments or email. Grading will be based on basic assignments, the final assignment project with documentation, as well as an essay in which a topic of choice, either technical or in which issues of interoperability, exchange and workflow support, is discussed in more depth.




Nr of participants




Special facilities

computer lab & presentation facilities




MA1 Motion and Modelling

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology


Title: Motion and Modelling

Date: 29.04.2008

Author: Bernard J. Geurts

Version: 1.0



Course name

Motion and Modelling

Study load

3 EC



Semester

1



Contents

In this course basic elements of analysis are introduced with the aim to discuss ordinary differential equations and their solution. Attention will be given to functions, vectors and matrices with the sole purpose of discussing dynamical systems as occur in smart technologies and java applications. In total 8 plenary lectures and 12 exercise classes will be included

In addition, a short project will be devoted to illustrating a ‘shooting method’, including elements of numerics, Matlab and visualization. A simple game will be developed as exercise for the students. The work-load of the project will be 0.5 EC, 1.5 EC will be allocated to the plenary lectures and exercise classes and 1 EC is for study by the students, monitored with homework..




Prerequisites

This is the first course in applied mathematics for Creative Technology. It will be designed in such a way that students with a high-school education from any of the ‘VWO’-tracks can successfully take part in the lectures and exercises.



Goals and attainment targets

After the course students will have a familiarity with the main concepts and fluency with working with these concepts. Full literacy will be attained with global analysis of simple ODE’s. Moreover, students will have some practice with formulating, analyzing and modelling dynamical systems and a general awareness of complexity in nonlinear systems.


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)




Course name

Motion and Modelling



Place in curriculum

This course is a ‘mathematics-primer’ that will provide a basis for a number of follow-up courses in the New Media and Smart Technology streams, such as systems and control, sensors and sensing, realistic virtual worlds and dynamic web applications. In the lectures an introduction to simple programming in Matlab will be included.




Application area, motivating examples

In this course examples will be taken from dynamical systems, including elements from follow-up courses in systems and control and in dynamic web-applications. The mathematical elements will be selected such that maximal support can be given to such follow-up courses.




Teaching methods

The backbone of the course is formed by 8 plenary lectures of 2 hours each. In these lectures key concepts will be introduced and discussed; attention will be given to connecting theory with examples from mechanical systems. In addition, 12 exercise classes of 2 hours each will be organized. These will allow students to deepen their understanding of the material and turn the concepts into operational procedures. Part of this will involve working with Matlab. Finally, the students will work on a short modelling project in which basic solution procedures for ordinary differential equations will be implemented in Matlab and developed into a simple dynamic game. The course is completed with a standard exam. Grading will be based on homework, the Matlab project and the exam.



Nr of participants

This course can be organized for virtually any expected number of participants.




Special facilities

The lectures and exercise classes will require access to Matlab.






MA2 Signals and Systems

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Signals and Systems

Date: 29-04-2008

Author: A.A. Stoorvogel

Version:1.0



Course name

Signals and Systems

Study load

3 EC



Semester

2



Contents

For many application areas, students should be able to analyse time signals. In order to understand the essence of signals, a decomposition of a signal in terms of sine/cosine functions is introduced. Its use is shown through motivating examples such as filters for removing noise from a signal but also how different radio signals can be transmitted with limited interference. Dynamical systems such as mechanical or electrical networks are often described through differential equations influenced by external time signals such as forces or voltages. The superposition principle will help us to understand the effects of these external time signals in case of linear systems.


In total 8 lectures and 12 exercise classes will be included.


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)


Course name

Signals and Systems



Goals and attainment targets

The main goal of this course is to introduce the student to some concepts from mathematics that will be needed in courses such as control systems, telecommunication and other courses in the New Media and Smart Technology track.

In itself it provides the student with a new tool for analysing time signals. It also enables the student to understand the dynamical behaviour of linear differential equations, which is the basic model in dynamical systems, both for mechanical and electrical networks.

After the course the students will have attained a familiarity with the main concepts and fluency with working with these concepts.




Prerequisites

A student should know classical functions such as sine/cosine/exponential/logarithm and be able to sketch their graph without use of calculator or computer. They should be aware of the essential properties of differentiation and integration. And connect these to the graph of a function. Students should be aware of basic properties of first and second-order differential equations and their solution by simple numerical schemes such as Euler’s method. A matrix representation for sets of linear equations should be familiar. Students should be familiar with the concept of complex numbers and Euler’s formula.



Place in curriculum

This course lays a foundation for follow-up courses in the curriculum and should hence be located in the first semester.



Application area, motivating examples

Any measurement from a temperature to a voltage results in a time signal. Being able to analyse this as a time function instead of as individual values allows the student to obtain more insight. Almost all dynamical systems are modelled based on differential equation and the added arsenal of frequency domain analysis enables the student to predict the behaviour in a completely different context. Without it, one will never be able to understand a concept such as resonance and learn why the wind will have a large effect on one bridge but a negligible effect on another.



Teaching methods

Lectures, exercise classes and practical assignment based on computer simulation in Matlab. Students will be assessed based on three short assignments and an exam paper.



Nr of participants

A minimum number of participants is 20.



Special facilities

Classical lecture room, with beamer and blackboard. Exercise classes with the possibility to work with a computer.





MA3 Statistics and probability

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Statistics and probability

Date: 29.04.2008

Author: Wilbert Kallenberg

Version: 1.0



Course name

Statistics and probability

Study load

3 EC



Semester

2



Contents

Concepts from probability theory will be familiarized, such as ‘probability’, ‘stochastic variable’, ‘probability distribution’, ‘expectations’ and ‘variance’. Statistics comes into play as soon as we deal with unknowns. In a number of simple situations the estimation of unknowns is required. We will also consider ‘confidence intervals’ to characterize the accuracy of estimation. Finally, we consider the theory of statistical testing, which allows statements to be made on the basis of research results. Applications will involve noisy signals. Students will be able to design, implement and interpret the outcome of statistical tests.




Prerequisites

Some familiarity with basic mathematical concept is required. Mathematical notations and operational capabilities with differentiation and integration is necessary.




Goals and attainment targets

The goal in this course is to understand basic concepts from probability and statistics and to be able to apply these in a number of situations relevant for creative technology applications. After the course the students will have attained a familiarity with the main concepts and fluency with working with these concepts.





Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Statistics and probability



Place in curriculum

As soon as one deals with data from empirical research one is confronted with statistics and probability. It is particularly relevant for New Media and sensor-networks, as well as for elements from business and market research.



Application area, motivating examples

Statistics can be encountered in many circumstances. What is really implied with a statistically significant result? How should one interpret a confidence interval? What value does an estimated efficiency of 4% have? Results from the past do not offer a guarantee for the future; sure, but what then is the value of statistical predictions?

Statistics is based on the calculus of probability. That is where we start with. You will get acquainted with basic concept from probability and their applications in practical circumstances.

Basic statistics consists of three parts: estimation, confidence intervals and statistical tests. Ample attention will be given to the interpretation of results. For a number of probability models the corresponding standard estimators will be discussed. How wrong can an estimator be? Confidence intervals give the answer.

Can the effectiveness of a computer game be quantified, e.g., in training people to use new services and instrumentation? For that one needs to conduct a statistical test. What can and can not be established with a test? You will learn to develop statistical test procedures in a systematic manner.



Teaching methods

Oral lectures (8) and exercise classes (12) will be provided – students will be assessed on the basis of three short assignments and an exam paper. The lectures will be based on lecture notes. The use of Matlab and training with SPSS will clarify statistics and probability.



Nr of participants

No restrictions.



Special facilities

No special facilities.





MA4 Strategies and Protocols

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Strategies and Protocols

Date: 29.04.2008

Author: Marc Uetz

Version: 1.0



Course name

Strategies and Protocols

Study load

3 EC



Semester

3



Contents

In our technologically advanced society, decentralization is not only omnipresent, but inevitable: Think of the functioning of sensor or computer networks, the organization of traffic, both on the streets or through the internet, or of auctions as an economic platform to make business. This course provides the basic foundation to understand, analyze, and design such decentralized systems. This includes basic foundations of game theory and provides an introduction to mechanisms design. Practical applications such as traffic routing, scheduling and internet protocols will be discussed.


The course is comprised of 8 plenary lectures, as well as 12 exercise sessions in which both theoretical issues and practical implementations are discussed. The latter with the help of adequate software (Matlab).



Prerequisites

It would be preferable if students enter the course with a basic knowledge of algorithms, mathematical modelling (for example mathematical programs), and the basics of probability theory.



Goals and attainment targets

After the course the students will have attained a familiarity with the main concepts and fluency with working with these.



Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Strategies and Protocols



Place in curriculum

Can in principle fit anywhere, yet with an eye on the mentioned prerequisites, shouldn’t be too early in curriculum. It is better to put the course Probability & Statistics first.




Application area, motivating examples

Contemporary technology is becoming increasingly complex, which leads to the fact that more and more systems and technological developments rely to some degree on decentralization, simply to keep `things manageable’. The most compelling example is the internet, which is inherently decentred, and consists of an incredible amount of different local protocols and algorithms. But also urban transportation systems, individual traffic, and even the organization of nowadays business world is not imaginable without the design of clever decentralized systems and mechanisms (think of EBay, or the business model for Google). This has been recognized also by the computer science community, and it is no coincidence that the newly emerging field `algorithmic game theory’ is one of the most rapidly developing fields in the intersection of Mathematics, Computer Science, and Economics/Operations Research. Understanding, and eventually designing such systems cannot be done without an understanding of the underlying principles of algorithms, protocols, and strategic behaviour. After the course the students better understand nowadays technologies, and eventually be able to contribute to the clever design of such systems, for example for the better use of network capacity, or for improving energy-efficiency or communication in decentralized systems, or clever business applications.




Teaching methods

Lectures, exercises (theoretical), practical sessions in computer lab where systems are actually designed and tested, with the help of adequate software, based on Matlab.



Nr of participants

No constraints



Special facilities

Computers, say one per every two students to work on practical assignments.





MA5 Queues and logistics

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: MA5: Queues and logistics

Date: 29.04.2008

Author: Richard J. Boucherie

Version: 1.0



Course name

Queues and logistics

Study load

3 EC



Semester

4



Contents

In this course basic elements of stochastic systems are introduced with the aim to give insight into the influence of randomness on system behaviour. Emphasis will be on insight into mathematical modelling and rules of thumb. Attention will be given to Markov chains, queuing problems and optimization, including decision processes under uncertainty.


In total 8 exercise classes will be provided to actively work with the theory. In addition, 4 exercise classes will be devoted to building a simulation environment to mimic the behaviour of an elementary logistics system of communicating items (Internet of Things).




Prerequisites

Introduction to statistics and probability; Strategies and protocols; Computer programming skills



Goals and attainment targets

After the course students have a basic understanding of the influence of randomness on system performance, and have experienced on-hand how communications will help to optimise the behaviour of logistics systems. A familiarity with the main concepts will be attained and fluency with working with these concepts.


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Queues and logistics



Place in curriculum

This course provides mathematical insight into system behaviour that will provide a basis for follow up courses in the New Media and Smart Technology streams, such as dynamic web applications, (educational) simulation games and sensor networks.




Application area, motivating examples

In this course examples will be taken from telecommunications, computer networks, world wide web, data bases, and logistics systems. A running example will be a network of sensors attached to items in logistics systems.




Teaching methods

The course consists of 8 lectures of 2 hours discussing key concepts, and 8 tutorial classes of 2 hours in which theory will be further developed via exercises and small tasks. In addition, 4 practice classes are added in which students develop in small groups a simulation environment to mimic the behaviour of a real world application. This will result in a small project in which students work in small groups to complete the simulation environment. Any programming involved will be based on Matlab.


The course is completed via the small project, and a written exam. Grading is based on the project and the exam.




Nr of participants

No constraints



Special facilities

Access to computers and a programming environment






CS1 Introduction to Computer Science

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Introduction to Computer Science

Date: 14-05-2008

Author: Angelika Mader

Version: 1.0



Course name

Introduction to Computer Science

Study load

3 EC



Semester

1



Contents

­This course gives an introductory overview over the topics of computer science that are relevant for Creative Technology. The context of phenomena and the relationship between concepts are treated extensively. The following areas will be addressed:

- Computer architecture

- Operating systems

- Protocols

- Languages

- Networks

- Databases



Prerequisites

none



Goals and attainment targets

The students get an overview over basic phenomena of computer science. They have a framework available where they can position phenomena they will find in other courses, and also the (fragmentary) knowledge they have at the beginning of the study. Students know the relationships between topics. They are familiar in using rationality for the identification of basic principles.

Students get familiarity in the following skills:

- positioning phenomena and products of computer science in a context

- explaining phenomena and their relationship

- identifying basic principles in a new product or service


The students are aware of basic concepts of: computer architecture, operating systems, protocols, languages, networks, databases



Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Introduction to Computer Science



Place in curriculum

This course is intended to give an overview over phenomena of computer science. It is prerequisite for all application domains, especially both streams of Creative Technology. By providing a birds’ perspective on basic concepts of different computer science domains the student get an overview that allows to place phenomena they meet later, in the study or after. The students learn to place phenomena in a context. Moreover, they learn an approach of using rationalism to analyse settings and problems. These abilities are crucial for abstraction and generalisation of problems and solutions.
The course is designed for the very beginning of the study.



Application area, motivating examples

See above




Teaching methods

Each lecture covers one topic as listed above. A topic is treated using different teaching methods:

- classical teaching in interactive form with assignments

- technodrama; role playing where students learn to use rationalism to analyze systems and problems. Feedback is for one part by the students themselves, for the other part by the lecturer. Depending on the topic a technodrama can last 15-30 minutes.

- essay; an essay has to be written about each topic where students collect and structure the material obtained during the lecture. They get feedback from the lecturer for each essay.




Nr of participants

For technodrama 12-20.



Special facilities

none






CS2 Programming for Creative Technology

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Programming for Creative Technology

Date: 14-05-2008

Author: Angelika Mader

Version: 1.0



Course name

Programming for Creative Technology

Study load

5 EC



Semester

1



Contents

Basic programming skills in C++ and C.

Common language concepts and constructs, such as types, variables, binding and scope, functions and procedures.
Basic principles of object oriented languages, such as objects, classes and subclasses, inheritance,

inclusion polymorphism.
Applications come from New Media as well as from Smart Systems by, e.g., NXT Lego robot control.




Prerequisites

none




Goals and attainment targets

After the course the student has elementary programming skills that are needed for Smart Technology and New Media. He/she can

- write simple programs in C++ and C, and debug them (fluent).

- adapt fragment of more complex programs to achieve different behaviour (fluent).

- use automatically generated code from Matlab/TwenteSim in own applications (familiar).

- explain and use basic language constructs, as types, variables, binding and scope, functions and procedures (familiar)

- explain and apply basic principles of object oriented languages, such as objects, classes and subclasses, inheritance,

inclusion polymorphism (familiar).

- is able to find and use standard solutions from libraries (aware).

- can predict complexity of program execution for simple applications (aware).


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)




Course name

Programming for Creative Technology



Place in curriculum

The course has to take place in the beginning of the first year. Programming skills are prerequisite for both streams of Creative Technology. The course contributes to basic skills of the discipline, and teaches the student to implement key prototypes to try out ideas.
There will be close interaction with MA1 (MatLab) and NM1.




Application area, motivating examples

- Graphical applications

- Lego NXT robots for C

- Integration of automatically generated code from MatLab/TwenteSim




Teaching methods

Classical lectures and working lectures with programming assignments.
First exercises are adapting existing programs to achieve different behaviour.

The students get feedback for each programming assignment.

The examples come from New Media and Smart Systems.




Nr of participants

unlimited



Special facilities

PCs, a sufficient number of Lego NXT boxes, Matlab





CS3 Programming with Structures

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology


Title: Programming with Structures

Date: 14.5.2008

Author: Angelika Mader

Version: 1.0



Course name

Programming with Structures

Study load

5 EC



Semester

3



Contents

More advanced programming concepts

Using the STL standard library.

Abstract data structures,



Prerequisites

Introduction to Programming




Goals and attainment targets

After the course the student:

- Has fluency in programming in C++.

- Is familiar with using libraries, such as the STL standard library.

- Is fluent in using abstract data structures, such as queues, stacks, arrays, and hash tables.

- Can use standard algorithms related to these data structures, fluently.

- Is aware of complexity of algorithms, knows the complexity of standard algorithms.

- Can decide for suitable data structures and algorithms based on complexity considerations.

- Is able to find alternative programming solutions making different use of resources




Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Programming with Structures



Place in curriculum

This course provides advanced programming skills. The student can implement applications and prototypes. He/she has sufficient conceptual basis of programming such that she can easily learn different programming languages if necessary. She can use libraries and integrate programs from different sources (e.g. Matlab output).



Application area, motivating examples

Visual computing
Control programming




Teaching methods

Classical lectures and working lectures with programming assignments.

The students get feedback for each programming assignment.

The examples come from New Media and Smart Systems.




Nr of participants

Unlimited




Special facilities

PCs






CS4 Data-driven applications

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Data-driven applications

Date: 14.5.2008

Author: Angelika Mader

Version: 1.0



Course name

Data-driven applications

Study load

3 EC



Semester

4



Contents

The course is an application driven approach to databases.

We focus more on practical applications than on data-base theory.
As state of the art language and tools, PHP and mySQL are treated.






Prerequisites

Introduction to Programming,

Programming and Data Structures



Goals and attainment targets

After the course the student:

- Is fluent in writing PHP applications.
- Is fluent in using mySQL.
- Can structure and decompose data driven problems in order to derive a clear interface to a database.

- Is fluent in generating data base applications.



Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)




Course name

Data-driven applications



Place in curriculum

Prepares for NM3. Is relevant for ubiquitous computing.



Application area, motivating examples

- Web-applications, such as games, forms.

- Algorithms that are able to learn.

- Context aware applications.

- Navigation and positioning applications.



Teaching methods

Classical lectures and practical assignments from NM and ST.
Feedback is given to assignments.



Nr of participants

unlimited



Special facilities

PCs





NM1 Web Technology

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Web technology

Date: 25/4/08

Author: A. Eliëns

Version: 1.0



Course name

Web Technology

Study load

3 EC



Semester

1



Contents

The course presents elementary web technology, primarily focussed on the

use of HTML, XML, CSS, and JavaScript, needed for authoring dynamic web pages.


Recommended literature: JavaScript: The Definitive Guide by David Flanagan

Online reference(s): http://www.w3schools.com/




Prerequisites

CS1



Goals and attainment targets

The course aims at providing

-awareness of web 2.0 business model(s)

-familiarity the complex computational infrastructure provided by the web platform

-fluency with (X)HTML, CSS styling, JavaScript and forms

-full literacy with authoring dynamic web pages

Students are expected to have a sufficient degree of curiosity, and will be stimulated to develop their skills in the actual production of playful dynamic web pages.



Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Web Technology



Place in curriculum

NM1 is an introductory course for all students. It is relevant to NM2 (interactive visualization), for publishing the results of CA-projects, as well as for the creation of individual portfolio(s). In relation to DE-courses, the focus of NM-courses

Is primarily on technical issues and programmatic authoring.



Application area, motivating examples

Dynamic web technology is used in a variety of ways, for example in simple online games, advertisement, and online shopping sites. Another interesting domain is web art, from which students may get inspiration for more advanced applications.



Teaching methods

The course will be organized around lectures, which will introduce basic examples and which will provide an in-depth explanation of the technologies. The assignments will consist of a series of basic exercises and a final exercise

In which the students are required to develop a moderately complex dynamic web application.

Regular feedback will be given in classroom sessions where students present their work as well as via online comments or email. Grading will be based on basic assignments, the final assignment project with documentation, as well as an essay in which a topic of choice, either technical or in relation to the business model of the web or its societal impact, is discussed in more depth.




Nr of participants




Special facilities

computer lab & presentation facilities





NM2 Interactive Visualization

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Interactive Visualization

Date: 25/4/08

Author: A. Eliëns

Version: 1.0



Course name

Interactive Visualization

Study load

5 EC



Semester

2



Contents

The course will address the development of rich media applications using current web-based media technology, with a special focus on animation and interactive visualization(s) of dynamic complex systems.

The platform used will be Adobe flex / as3.


Recommended literature: Foundation Actionscript 3.0 Animation: Making Things Move! By Keith Peters

Online reference(s): http://livedocs.adobe.com/flex/3




Prerequisites

CA1, CS1, NM1, MA1



Goals and attainment targets

During the course students are expected to learn the skills to create moderately complex media applications.

After following the course, students are expected to have

-awareness of issues in information visualisation

-familiarity with XML-based data and program configuration

-fluency in scripting (Actionscript) and the use of flex.

- full literacy in developing simple physics based animations

Students are expected to have an explorative attitude, and will be stimulated in developing aesthetically interesting animations and dynamical visualisations.


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Interactive Visualization



Place in curriculum

NM2 is meant to be an intermediate course, required for both ST and NM students. The course will enable students to apply their knowledge of dynamic systems and mathematics in a (media-rich) context, as a preparation for more advanced projects in virtual environments and game development. ).. In relation to DE-courses, the focus of NM-courses

Is primarily on technical issues and programmatic authoring. )..



Application area, motivating examples

Physics based animation is an effective means of visualizing complex information structures. Effective information visualization moreover depends on intuitive ways of interaction to support exploration. Interactive information visualization is increasingly being used in web 2.0 applications, for giving access to huge amounts of user-contributed data such as blogs and video.



Teaching methods

The course will be organized around lectures in which both technical and conceptual issues, related to animation and visualization, are dealt with. The assignments will consist of a series of basic exercises and a final exercise

In which the students are required to develop a moderately complex dynamic web application.

Regular feedback will be given in classroom sessions where students present their work as well as via online comments or email. Grading will be based on basic assignments, the final assignment project with documentation, as well as an essay in which a topic of choice, either technical or in relation to issues of animation and information visualisation, is discussed in more depth.




Nr of participants

Max 35



Special facilities

computer lab & presentation facilities, installation of flex 3 SDK.





NM3 Web2.0 Mashups

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Web 2.0. Mashup(s)

Date: 25/4/08

Author: A. Eliëns

Version: 1.0



Course name

Web2.0. Mashup(s)

Study load

3 EC



Semester

3



Contents

The course presents advanced web technology, that allows for the development of data-driven dynamic web applications, using web services, such as Google maps and AJAX, XML and JSON,in the Rich Internet Application, provided by flex /as3.


Recommended literature: Professional Web 2.0 Programming, by Eric van der Vlist, Danny Ayers, Erik Bruchez, Joe Fawcett, Alessandro Vernet

Online reference(s):

-http://code.google.com

-http://www.adobe.com/devnet/flex




Prerequisites

CS1



Goals and attainment targets

The course aims at providing

-awareness of available web 2.0 services, tools, APIs and SDKs

-familiarity the design and development life-cycle of data-driven rich-media applications

-fluency with flex in combination with AJAX and web services

-full literacy with developing moderately complex media rich applications

Students are expected to have a sufficient degree of creativity, and will be stimulated to explore the wealth of available technologies to make stunning applications.


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Web 2.0. Mashup(s)



Place in curriculum

NM3 is an advanced course for NM students. As a follow-up on NM1 and NM2 it allows, in combination with CS4: Data Driven Applications, to build fully-functional, professional web sites, such as social community sites.



Application area, motivating examples

Current Web 2.0 sites allow for user contributed content, including media content such as images and video. Many of the existing sites, such as YouTube and Flickr, moreover, offer APIs to use and store content by means of web services.

Mashups allow for quickly developing prototypes, incorporating web services, that in it self may act as media portals, providing web services to for other communities. Many interesting sites of this type are developed in the domain of cultural heritage, in particular historical museums and museum of contemporary art.



Teaching methods

The course will be organized around lectures, which will introduce basic examples and which will provide an in-depth explanation of the technologies. The assignments will consist of a series of basic exercises and a final exercise

In which the students are required to develop a moderately complex dynamic web application.

Regular feedback will be given in classroom sessions where students present their work as well as via online comments or email. Grading will be based on basic assignments, the final assignment project with documentation, as well as an essay in which a topic of choice, either technical or in relation to the application of web services in the development of digital learning or educational games, is discussed in more depth.




Nr of participants

30-40



Special facilities

computer lab & presentation facilities






NM4 Virtual Environments

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Virtual Environments

Date: 25/4/08

Author: A. Eliëns

Version: 1.0



Course name

Virtual Environments

Study load

6 EC



Semester

3



Contents

The course introduces virtual environments, more in particular 3D virtual environments, such as deployed for online games and communities, as well as for scientific data visualisation. The course will focus on open standards for web 3D, that is X3D and VRML, and also discuss extensions to flex / as3 for developing 3D immersive applications, such as Papervision3D. .

Recommended literature: Professional Web 2.0 Programming, by Eric van der Vlist, Danny Ayers, Erik Bruchez, Joe Fawcett, Alessandro Vernet

Online reference(s):

-http://www.x3dbook.com/slidesets

-http://www.web3d.org

-http://blog.papervision3d.org



Prerequisites

MA1, CS1, CS2, NM1, NM2



Goals and attainment targets

The course aims at providing

-awareness of technologies for networked 3D virtual environment

-familiarity with 3D display technology, shaders and visual effects

-fluency with scripting dynamic behaviour in 3D virtual worlds

-full literacy with building interactive X3D/VRML applications

Students are expected to have a sufficient degree of craftmanship, and will be stimulated to create visually appealing environments, with intriguing narratives.


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)




Course name

Virtual Environments



Place in curriculum

NM4 is an introductory course in virtual environments for NM students. It builds on NM2, where animation was introduced in a 2D context. It must be regarded as a prerequisite for NM5, in which game development is the topic, and as the technical background for CA3: Hybrid World(s).



Application area, motivating examples

Online Virtual Communities have a long history, and recently became popular by online role playing games such as World of War Craft and Second Life. Also (web) 3D has gained a respected place in online product demos and infotainment.



Teaching methods

The course will be organized around lectures, which will introduce basic examples and which will provide an in-depth explanation of the technologies. The assignments will consist of a series of basic exercises and a final exercise

In which the students are required to develop a moderately complex dynamic web application.

Regular feedback will be given in classroom sessions where students present their work as well as via online comments or email. Grading will be based on basic assignments, the final assignment project with documentation, as well as an essay in which a topic of choice, either technical or in relation to graphics programming and visual effects, is discussed in more depth.




Nr of participants




Special facilities

computer lab & presentation facilities




NM5 Game Development

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Game Development

Date: 25/4/08

Author: A. Eliëns

Version: 1.0



Course name

Game Development

Study load

6 EC



Semester

4



Contents

The course gives an introduction in the design development of (digital) games. Attention will also be given to the analysis and critical comparison of games, using game interaction patterns, as well as popular technologies for games, both online such as flex / as3, and PC and console based games, including DirectX, XNA, and the Half Life 2 SDK.


Recommended literature: Björk, S., Holopainen, J. (2005) Patterns in Game Design. Charles River Media,

Online reference(s): http://www.gamedesignpatterns.org




Prerequisites

NM3, NM4



Goals and attainment targets

The course aims at providing

-awareness of the application of games in education and learning

-familiarity the concepts and techniques of the design of serious games

-fluency in analyzing games using game patterns

-full literacy with developing casual games

Students are expected to have a sufficient degree of analytical insight, and will be stimulated to be creative in the design and development of a game.



Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Game Development



Place in curriculum

NM5 is an advanced course for NM students. It is relevant to NM4 (virtual environments), but is more analytical in its approach, with respect to the critical comparison of game mechanics, that is the conceptual structure of games, and the challenges offered to the player.. It is explicitly meant to be of interest also for students specializing in ST.



Application area, motivating examples

Games increasingly become important in for example digital learning and corporate training. Games are appealing for both conceptual reasons as well as their sensorial impact, due to the use of powerful multimedia technology. There seems to be an increasing demand from the creative industry for young creative people with experience in game development.



Teaching methods

The course will be organized around lectures, which will cover the theoretical topics and which will provide an introduction to the various technologies used in game development. The assignments will consist of a series of basic exercises in game design and a final assignment in which an actual game will be developed by a group of students.

In which the students are required to develop a moderately complex dynamic web application.

Regular feedback will be given in classroom sessions, and workshops, where students present their work as well as via online comments or email. Grading will be based on basic assignments, the final assignment project with documentation, as well as an essay in which a topic of choice, either technical or in relation the design or deployment of serious games, is discussed in more depth.




Nr of participants




Special facilities

computer lab & presentation facilities




ST1 Smart Environments


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Smart Environments

Date: 11.03.2008

Author: Hans Scholten

Version: 1.0



Course name

Smart Environments

Study load

3 EC



Semester

1



Contents

The course gives an introduction to smart technology and environments, their history and relation to embedded systems. It shows how developments in computer and sensor technology have led to smart systems. Smart systems, as found in e.g. ambient intelligence, are networks of embedded computers and smart sensors that offer new and innovative services deemed impossible with traditional computers. These systems support people in their daily live in an unobtrusive way. Examples can be found in leisure and entertainment, but also in more serious applications like intelligent houses, offices, and cars and traffic control. In parallel to, and inspired by the lectures, the students have access to the SmartXP laboratory to gain hands-on experience with smart technology. In a group, students design and build a prototype based on ready-to-use smart technology components such as sensors, sensor nodes, RFID tags and Smartphones. During the course the students present their ideas, designs and prototypes.


The following subjects are addressed in the course:

Smart technology, what it is and what it is not

Smart systems, smart sensors, wireless sensor networks

Sensor technology

Ubiquitous computing, Marc Weiser’s vision

Critical issues: privacy, trust, scalability, aesthetics, annoyances

State of the art, examples, case studies

Introduction to the SmartXP Lab

Group exercise: design a smart environment application and build a prototype based on ready-to-use components



Prerequisites

None


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)

Course name

Smart Environments



Goals and attainment targets

This course gives students an overview of smart technology, state of the art and applications. It shows the relationship of smart technology and new media and gives a context for subsequent courses and projects. During the course the students have access to the SmartXP Lab to gain hands-on experience with smart technology.


After the course the students are able to:

to explain basic concepts of smart technology

to put smart technology in context with other courses

to “invent” new applications and services based on smart technology

to realize basic prototypes based on smart technology

to present and defend ideas

to organize and manage a team


Knowledge:

Smart technology, ubiquitous computing and related concepts

State of the art

Practical lab experience



Place in curriculum

Smart Environments is an introductory course and is a precursor for the courses Sensors, and Systems and Control. The design exercise is a precursor for following creative applications projects.




Application area, motivating examples

See above



Teaching methods

Lectures, student presentations, hands-on in SmartXP Lab



Nr of participants

20, extension to 80 students possible



Special facilities

Facilities in the SmartXP Lab, PCs, sensors, sensor nodes, RFID tags, Smartphones, miscellaneous materials to make prototypes



ST2 Dynamical Systems


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Dynamical Systems

Date:04-04.2008

Author: Job van Amerongen

Version: 1.0



Course name

Dynamical Systems

Study load

6 EC



Semester

1-2



Contents

Models of dynamical systems and simultaneously introduction to mathematics and physics



Prerequisites

Prerequisites are: Basic mathematics, formula manipulation, exponential functions



Goals and attainment targets

The goal of this course is to get insight in the behaviour of dynamical systems, in the continuous-time as well as in the discrete time domain. Based on simple examples from society, biology and engineering the students will learn to make abstractions of such systems, by first detecting the relations between the elements of such systems and next by creating models of such systems that can be simulated in 20-sim. The simulation models will form the basis for a more mathematical description of such systems in the form of differential equations.


After completing this course the student should

be able to make a description of complex systems where different functions and or elements interact with each other in a feedback structure

be able to make simulation models of such systems

be able to translate these simulation models into transfer functions or differential equations

have enough knowledge of the basic physical laws in the various domains to be able to describe mechanical, electrical and hydraulic systems with ideal physical elements and to see the analogies between these domains on a system level

understand the influence of feedback and control on the system behaviour


The student should reach a level of Awareness and Familiarity with the topics treated in this course.



Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)




Course name

Dynamical Systems



Place in curriculum

This introductory course is meant to teach basic physics and mathematics on a systems level, central to both streams in creative technology. The course starts as early as possible in the first year and should be given in parallel with a more mathematical-oriented course MA1.



Application area, motivating examples

This course is essential for making simulations in the design phase of technical systems, but also for making realistic virtual reality simulations as well as for understanding societal and economical systems where dynamics play a role.

Examples will be chosen from everyday life and will range from traffic control systems, description of a Segway to models of the financing of a university.



Teaching methods

A combination of lectures, exercise classes and modelling projects, performed in groups of students. Examination is through tests and reports/presentations of the modelling project.



Nr of participants

During the lectures all students, the modelling projects will be done in small teams of students.



Special facilities

PC, 20-sim, some technical setups




ST3 Control Systems

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Control Systems

Date: 18.05.2008

Author: Job van Amerongen

Version: 1.0



Course name

Control Systems

Study load

4 EC



Semester

3



Contents

Feedback control systems, including topics:

Refresh modelling of dynamical systems and basic control concepts

System descriptions with transfer functions, frequency domain descriptions (bode plots, nyquist plots) and in the time domain

Feed-forward and feedback control structures. Accuracy, sensitivity and stability

Controller design in different domains (s, jω t)

Introduction to optimal control

Digital control systems



Prerequisites

Prerequisites are: Complex variables, Fourier analysis, matrices (from the courses MA1 and MA2), dynamical systems and simulation with e.g. 20-sim (ST2)



Goals and attainment targets

This course treats the design of control systems in the time domain (state space) and in the Laplace and frequency domain.

After completing this course the student should

know how feed-forward and feedback control can be applied to modify the performance of system

be able to describe systems with transfer functions, poles and zero’s, frequency plots and in state space notation

be able to uses these descriptions for designing feedback control systems

know how an accurate control system can be designed that is insensitive for disturbances and parameter variations

know the consequences of using digital computers in control systems

be able to apply this theory in practice


The student should reach a level of Familiarity and Fluency with the topics treated in this course.


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Control Systems



Place in curriculum

This course requires appropriate mathematical background and assumes that the course on dynamic modelling has been followed. Preferably also a basic electronics course should precede this course. It is planned in the second year of the curriculum



Application area, motivating examples

Automatic control is everywhere around us and smart systems will have in most cases some form of control present. Examples are abundant, such as the Segway, automotive control systems like active suspension, ESP, adaptive cruise control, all mechatronic systems etc.



Teaching methods

Lectures and a project, performed in groups of two or three. Examination is through tests and reports/presentations of the project.



Nr of participants

During the lectures all students, the projects will be done in small teams of 2-3 students.



Special facilities

PC, 20-sim, some technical setups





ST4 Wireless Communication Systems


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Wireless communication systems

Date: April 2008

Authors: Frank Leferink, Chris Roeloffzen, Mark Bentum

Version: 1.0



Course name

Wireless communication systems

Study load

4 EC



Semester

3



Contents

Design, modelling and implementation of modern and future (wireless) communication systems

Basic concepts of communication systems, transmission, communication channels, electromagnetic fields, radio communication. Examples of applications such as WiFi, Bluetooth, short range radio networks



Prerequisites

Linear systems, signals and noise, network theory (from courses mathematics and dynamical systems)




Goals and attainment targets

The goal of this course is to give the student insight in modern communication systems such that he/she is capable to understand the possible applications and limitations. Therefore the student should be able to model modern communication systems, and optimize them. The student can apply the knowledge in integrating the communication systems in new concepts and products. The student shall be capable to design a new communication system, and optimize it, for upcoming modern application. The focus will be more on using existing building blocks and to give feedback to building block designers. This will get emphasis in practical experiments to be performed during the course.


The student should reach a level of Awareness and Familiarity with the topics treated in this course.



Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Wireless communication systems



Place in curriculum

Based on the assumption that society needs more data throughput, more communication between products, often on ad-hoc basis, this course will present the basic knowledge needed for this societal need from a technical point of view. This course is therefore giving a basic background, founded on knowledge of systems, electromagnetic fields and signals and noise. In the second part of the course the focus will be more on possible new applications. The acquired knowledge can be used and applied, or preferably embedded, in the more application-specific CA courses.





Application area, motivating examples

Communication systems are in use everywhere and anywhere. But new and more ad-hoc communication systems, often without human interaction, will be apparent in our living environment. This will enable complete new concepts, products and services.




Teaching methods

A combination of lectures, exercise classes and experiments. Assessment will be base on an exam and evaluation of the experiments.



Nr of participants

Not limited.




Special facilities

Available lab infrastructure.





ST5 Introduction to Electronics

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Introduction to Electronics

Date: 18.05.2008

Author: Paul Regtien

Version: 1.0



Course name

Introduction to Electronics

Study load

4 EC



Semester

4



Contents

Electronic circuits and systems for the processing of analogue sensor signals; amplifiers, filters, AD-converters.



Prerequisites

Electronic components (properties, models); network theory; complex variables; impedances as taught in courses dynamical systems and mathematics



Goals and attainment targets

The objective of this course is to provide basic knowledge of electronics, in particular, about the structure, functionality and properties of an electronic data acquisition system as the connection between a sensor and the computer.


After having successfully completed this course, the student should:

§understand the most important electronic functions of a data acquisition system;

§be able to formulate and interpret specifications of an instrumentation system;

§have knowledge on the basic properties of diodes and transistors (bipolar and field effect);

§be able to design an electronic amplifier, using operational amplifiers, for a specific application;

§be able to design an electronic filter (either passive or active) according to a given set of specifications;

§be able to design an interface circuit for a resistive, capacitive, inductive, piezoelectric and optical sensor;

§understand the effects of sampling and quantisation on the quality of the measured signal.

Students should reach a level of Awareness and Familiarity with the topics of this course.



Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Introduction to Electronics



Place in curriculum

The course can be placed anywhere in the 2nd year, but the students should have knowledge on the topics indicated at the Prerequisites.



Application area, motivating examples

The electrical output of a sensor can not be connected directly to the input of an AD-converter. For an adequate processing the signal must first be amplified, shifted, filtered and/or modulated to make it suitable for conversion and to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. In a multi-sensor system, also multiplexing is required. All these functions can be realised using relative simple analogue circuits. Examples are (1) interfacing optical devices (LED, photo-diode) or ultrasonic devices (transmitter, receiver) for contact free distance measurements in a navigation task, (2) interfacing temperature sensors for monitoring the thermal behaviour of a system and (3) interfacing a piezoelectric accelerometer for control purposes.



Teaching methods

Start with lectures and classroom exercises, followed by practical training in designing and testing electronic circuits. Integration of further practical training with a CA project during the year 2 will be preferred.



Nr of participants

up to the maximum capacity of classrooms and/or laboratories.



Special facilities

standard measurement equipment (as in the former “WELP-zaal” of EWI), with standard software (including LabView) and a collection of electronic components (mainly resistors, capacitors, operational amplifiers).





ST6 Sensors


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Sensors

Date: 18.05.2008

Author: Paul Regtien

Version: 1.0



Course name

Sensors

Study load

3 EC



Semester

4



Contents

Sensors, their properties and applications:

1

general considerations on sensors; specifications

resistive sensors (basics, constructions)

2

resistive sensing: displacement, rotation, interfacing

resistive sensing: thermal, tactile

3

capacitive sensors: basics; constructions, permittivity

capacitive sensing: displacement, rotation; interfacing

4

inductive/magnetic sensors: basics, induction, permeability

measuring magnetic fields (Hall, flux gate, AMR)

5

inductive sensing: proximity, displacement

inductive sensing: rotation, compass, 2- or 3D position

6

piezoelectric sensors: basics, piezoelectricity, materials

piezoelectric sensing: pressure, acceleration

7

optical sensors: components, properties

optical sensing: displacement (intensity); interfacing

8

optical sensing: encoders; interferometry

acoustic sensors: basics (sound generation, propagation)

9

acoustic sensing: distance, velocity

navigational sensing (beacons, beaconless)




Prerequisites

basics of physics and mathematics (VWO); properties of signals and systems (basic level)



Goals and attainment targets

After having successfully completed this course the student should get familiarity with:

§basic methods for measuring quantities and parameters in the electrical, thermal and mechanical domain

§sensors commonly used for the measurement of these quantities

§the general performance and basic limitations of these sensors

§deploying sensors in an application contexts (in alignment with CA2)

The student should reach a level of Awareness and Familiarity with the topics treated in this course.

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)




Course name

Sensors



Place in curriculum

The course is a prerequisite for CA2, where the technology should be applied. It is given as the first course in the ST domain, to make students familiar with the sensor technology.



Application area, motivating examples

The interaction between (intelligent) systems and their environment takes place through sensors. This course is intended to provide insight in the way how to realise such interaction using commercially available devices (sensors and accessories) and how to avoid unwanted interference. Examples are: (1) autonomous navigation in an unknown or unstructured environment, (2) monitoring environmental conditions for proper operation of systems (safety, efficiency, appropriateness) and (3) aids for disabled persons (increasing mobility and independence).(4) for identification, using RFID.



Teaching methods

Start with lectures and classroom exercises, followed by practical training. The latter can be realised through laboratory training just about sensors, but a better way is to integrate such training in a design project where application of sensors is made mandatory.



Nr of participants

up to the maximum capacity of classrooms and/or laboratories.



Special facilities

standard measurement equipment (as in the former “WELP-zaal” of EWI), with standard software (including LabView) and a collection of sensors (optical, acoustic, thermal, resistive and magnetic).




BI1 Design marketing


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Design Marketing

Date: 16.05.2008

Author: Wouter Eggink

Version:1.0



Course name

Design Marketing

Study load

2.5 EC



Semester

3



Contents

This course combines knowledge on business skills, marketing, design and strategy. Topics are;

-Business plan and research and development

-Marketing mix

-Benchmarking as a tool for obtaining design requirements and –strategy

-Design management principles



Prerequisites

DE2, DE3




Goals and attainment targets

The students learn to combine business and marketing knowledge with their design goals in order to make solutions that sell. After completion of the course the students are familiar with the basics of marketing and design management and can apply simple business principles when developing products and services.

The students are aware of the application possibilities of

-Benchmarking

-Marketing Mix, Maslow’s hierarchy

-Branding



Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Design Marketing



Place in curriculum

This course is a bridge between the design applications line, where the students obtain the ability to design attractive solutions and business theory. In general this course will emphasize on business impact of design decisions and vice versa. It is not focussed on the actual design itself.




Application area, motivating examples

The students learn to combine business and marketing knowledge with their design goals in order to make solutions that sell. To obtain successful products, a good design (both technical and aesthetical) is not enough. Business skills play a major role in making new developments profitable.




Teaching methods

Series of lectures and workshops. Assignments throughout the course. In between results will be evaluated in class. Assessment with portfolio and a test.




Nr of participants

Number of participants up to 40 students per class




Special facilities

No special facilities needed





BI2 Business management

Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology

Title: Business management

Date: May 2008

Author: Dennis Schipper

Version:1.0



Course name

Business management

Study load

3 EC



Semester

4



Contents

Development of a business plan including mission statement, description of product, product development, description of market, analysis of competitors, sales & marketing, finance, personnel



Prerequisites

None



Goals and attainment targets

The goal of this course is to get insight in how to start up your own business. In an earlier course the students have developed an innovative product. In this course the students have to develop a business plan for this product and present this plan to panel of experts. This panel includes an experienced entrepreneur, a financial expert and a business angel. The aim is to convince the business angel to invest the necessary funds to start up the business. The best business plan will be rewarded.


After completing this course the students should be able to develop a business plan including:

Description of product including QFD analysis

Description of product development including estimation of development costs and production costs

Market analysis, analysis of competitors

Sales & marketing, choice of business model

Finance


Course and curriculum development for Creative Technology (continued)



Course name

Business management



Place in curriculum

This course is meant to get insight in the various aspects which are essential to start up your business successfully.



Application area, motivating examples

This course is essential for making a plan how to develop and commercialize an innovative product. Examples of successful business cases (for example TOMTOM) will be chosen and presented through lectures.



Teaching methods

A combination of lectures including successful business cases and a project in which small groups of students develop a business plan. Each group is supported by an experienced entrepreneur. Examination is through report (business plan)and presentation to a panel.



Nr of participants

During the lectures all students, no constraints on the number of participants. The development and presentation of their own business plan will be done in small teams of students, max. 4 students per team.



Special facilities

None




2Staff CVs

Prof.dr.ir. J. van Amerongen (EWI)

Job van Amerongen studied Electrical Engineering at Delft University of Technology, where he obtained an MSc. Degree in 1971 and a Ph.D. degree in 1982. From 1971-1973 he did his military service as officer in the Royal Netherlands Navy. From 1973-1987 he worked as assistant and associate professor at the Control Laboratory of Delft University of Technology, on applications of modern control theory, especially model reference adaptive control, in ship control systems and electrical power production systems.

Since 1987 he is professor in Control Engineering in the EE Department at the UT. From 1990-1992 he chaired a committee in Electrical Engineering responsible for a complete curriculum renewal. In 1991-1992 he was member of the International Program Review committee for EE which compared the curricula of a number of universities in Western Europe. From 1994-1998 he was dean of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering. Since 2005 he is head of the department of Electrical Engineering. Since 2008 he is member of the team that develops the new curriculum on "Creative Technology."

He is member of the IFAC Technical Committee on Mechatronics, the IFAC TC on Marine Systems and international member of the IMechE Mechatronics Working Group in the UK. He is (co-)author of many papers on adaptive and intelligent control systems, mechatronics and automatic steering of ships, co-author of a book on adaptive control systems and author of three courses on systems and control of the Dutch Open university. He supervised more than 30 PhD students.

Dr.ir. G.M. Bonnema (CTW)

Maarten Bonnema studied Electrical Engineering at the University of Twente. His final thesis (1992) was on the performance of a piezoelectrically driven one-port resonator. This MEMS related research involved modelling and measuring several vibrating microbeams.

During the Master studies, the interest in a broader education than Electrical Engineering arose. He therefore continued his studies in Delft, in a post-MSc course on Technical Systems. This course involved theory from Mechanical Engineering and a project. During the project he developed, together with a Master student, a compact XY(Phi=0)-stage. The mechanics, measurement and control strategy were developed using an integrated, mechatronic, approach.

In 1995 he started at ASML as systems engineer. His focus was on the mechatronics of the stages and overlay for the TwinScan wafer scanners. Contributions were made to dose-control and control architecture. In this role he contributed to several patents.

In 1999 he started as an assistant professor at the University of Twente where he contributed to the design education of the Mechanical Engineering curriculum. He was involved in the new curriculum for Industrial Design Engineering, from the beginning. He wrote, together with three colleagues, an introductory book on product design. In parallel to course development and teaching, he researched the conceptual design process, in particular the design of complex systems. This has resulted in several papers and a PhD thesis "FunKey Architecting".

While employed at the University of Twente, MAPPER lithography, hired him to contribute (in part-time) to their system design; in particular to the wafer positioning system.


Ir. W. Eggink (CTW)

Wouter Eggink was graduated at Delft University in Industrial Design Engineering (Msc) in 1996. Worked from 1996 until 2000 as a mechanical system designer at the marine systems developer Thales in Hengelo. From 2000 up to 2007 designer and project manager at the product design agency D’Andrea & Evers Design in Hengelo and Enter. Since 2007 employed as Assistant professor at the laboratory of Design, Management and Production of the University of Twente.

Since 2001 (part-time) he has been teaching several design-courses in the Industrial Design Engineering bachelor education program of the University of Twente. Since 2007 also in the Master track Design and Styling.

He took care of development of courses for Hand-drawing, Form and Meaning, Visual presentation Skills and Design from Philosophic Perspective. Involved in the creation of a new Bachelor Curriculum for Industrial Design Engineering to be implemented in September 2008.

His research activities are concentrated on the expression of meaning with the design of products. Performing a PhD on the history of Non-rational design. In order to enrich contemporary design practice with more intuitive working strategies. Several publications on methods for the design of products from philosophic perspective.


Dr. A. Eliëns

Anton Eliëns studied art, psychology, philosophy, and computer science. He graduated cum laude in theoretical computer science, and published his Ph.D. thesis on the design, implementation and semantics of the distributed logic programming language DLP as a text book. He also published a book on object-oriented software development, of which the second edition has been translated in Russian and Chinese.

Anton Eliëns is lecturer at the Computer Science department of the Faculty of Science of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, where he teaches multimedia courses. He is also coordinator of the Master Multimedia for Computer Science, and chairman of the curriculum committee for Information, Multimedia and Management. He has written numerous papers on the application of (intelligent) multimedia technologies. His most recent projects include the establishment of a virtual campus in Second Life, and the development of a game-platform, XIMPEL, driven by interactive video, for the Clima Futura climate game. This work has led to the foundation of the Clima Futura Laboratories BV, that specializes in media and game productions for climate issues and sustainability.

Anton Eliëns has ample expertise in teaching, and in particular in doing projects with groups of 10-20 students. His work with students has often led to publications on conferences. He has supervised three Ph.D. students, and acquired two NWO Open Competition projects, in the areas of intelligent agents in virtual environments and information retrieval in virtual environments. His current activities focus on the application of game technology in serious applications and the development of serious games for education and business training.


Prof.dr.ir. B.J. Geurts (EWI)

Bernard Geurts is Professor for Multiscale Modelling and Simulation at the University of Twente and Professor for Anisotropic Turbulence at Eindhoven University of Technology. He works primarily in the field of turbulence and its modulation arising from interactions with rotation, stratification, ensembles of embedded particles and electromagnetic fields. He is active in international collaborations, chairing the COST Action 'LESAID' and the ERCOFTAC special interest group on direct and large-eddy simulation. In his work he combines first principles form the natural sciences with rigorous mathematics to arrive at consistent and accurate models for complex technological, bio-medical and environmental problems. He is interested in simplicity behind complexity, in structures, in what combines and what is shared, rather than what separates.


Dr. A.H. Mader (EWI)

Angelika Mader studied Computer Science (with minor  Mathematics) at the Technical University in München, Germany, from 1984 until 1990. In 1991 she started her PhD in theoretical computer science and finished in 1997. From 1997 she was postdoc at the University of Nijmegen, in the group Informatics for Technical Applications. In 2001 Angelika Mader came to the University of Twente to the group Distributed and Embedded Systems, where she is holding a position as assistant professor since 2003. Her research interests include modelling and verification of embedded systems. Since 2006 she is vice chair of the Female Faculty Network of the University of Twente.


Dr. Zs. Ruttkay (EWI)


Zsófia Ruttkay graduated with honours in mathematics at Eötvös Lorand University, Budapest. She has a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering and one in Computer Science, both from Technical University Budapest.

She has been working as post-doc and senior researcher at the Automation and Computer Science Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Budapest), the Free University and the Centrum for Mathematics and Computer Science in Amsterdam. Since 2000 she is part-time Associate Professor position at the University of Twente, Department of Computer Science, Human-Media Interaction Group. Since 2006 she has been also acting as chair of two groups to develop the Creative Technology course at the University of Twente. She is a guest professor at the Pazmany Peter Catholic University in Budapest.

With experience in applied mathematics, AI (search, constraint satisfaction, evolutionary computing) and computer graphics, and earlier work on user interfaces and facial animation, her current research focuses on the development of reactive and individual Virtual Agents, for (serious) gaming applications. She has designed a mark-up language for defining and generating individual behaviour, and has been contributing to an international standard behavioural mark-up language development. Her other research interest is in Creative Technology, particularly, in applications on the intersection of arts and computing technology. She has over 100 scientific publications, and (co-)organized several international events.

She launched and acted as director for the Stichting Vierkant voor Wiskunde, and adopted Hungarian maths educational methods to off-school activities for Dutch teenagers. She has been on Board of the Ars et mathesis Foundation.


Ir. J. Scholten (EWI)

Hans Scholten studied electrical engineering at the Technische Hogeschool Twente in Enschede. In 1981 he joined the Computer Science Department of the University of Twente. There he started research on word-processing. The project's tangible result, WPplus, became the standard for word-processing at the university. WPplus was licensed to Sharp and more than 5000 copies were sold. After being involved in research on parallel and distributed (multimedia) systems, Hans Scholten started research in the area of home computing and networking. He was project leader of the NWO sponsored project At Home Anywhere (AHA) and coordinated the FP6 European project "The European Application Home Alliance" (TEAHA). Since 2003 Hans Scholten is co-author and participates in several national and international ubiquitous computing related projects, like Smart Surroundings, Featherlight, Aware and Sensei.

Recently he joined the newly established Pervasive Systems group, where he coordinates the group's teaching and education. He develops and teaches courses in ubiquitous computing, operating systems, networking, and computer architecture. He is daily supervisor of several PhD and graduate students.

Hans Scholten has been a member of several conference and workshop programme and steering committees. He was organizer of IDMS2000 in Twente. He is a regular reviewer for CACM for home network and consumer electronics related submissions, and has been reviewer for over 50 conferences and workshops. He advises industry and is co-founder of the university spin-off company Rollermate, which specializes in ubiquitous and palpable technology.

His current interests are ubiquitous computing, wireless sensor networks, context awareness and creative technology.