Vakgroep Psychologie, Gezondheid & Technologie

Illness perceptions and depression after stroke

Type of assignment:                    BA thesis HPT, 15 EC

Internal or external?:                    internal

Maximum number of students      Yes; 1 student

Individual collecting of data?        data are collected in collaboration with MST

Type of research:                         quantitative


Description of the assignment:

Ischemic stroke is one of the most common causes of morbidity and case fatality in developing countries, leading to impacting consequences in different domains of life. Problems with emotional functioning are reported frequently.  Demographic factors, stroke characteristics and physical impairments are well researched determinants of the decrease in emotional functioning. However, it is suggested that other factors, such as patients’ perceptions of their illness can add to the explanation of individual differences in (emotional) functioning after stroke. 

 

Illness perceptions are the common sense beliefs people have about their illness such as perceptions of the identity, cause, time line, consequences and controllability of their disease.

 

Van Mierlo et al. (2015) studied illness perceptions over time in post stroke patients and found that illness cognitions and changes in illness perceptions were independently associated with one aspect of emotional functioning: life satisfaction of people after stroke.

 

In a collaboration project with the department of neurology of the Medisch Spectrum Twente patients are followed during one year with assessments in the first week after stroke, and after 3, 6, and 12 months. At these time points clinical and radiological data are collected and patients complete questionnaires about depression, illness perceptions and other variables.

The aim of this study is to explore the course of depression during the first year after stroke, to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between illness perceptions and depression.

Van Mierlo, M.L., van Heugen, C.M., Post, M.W.M., de Kort,, P.L.M., & Visser-Meiily, J.M.A. (2015). Life satisfaction post stroke: The role of illness cognitions. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 79, 137-142.

Schepers, V., Post, M., Visser-Meily, A., & van de Port, I, et al. (2009). Predictors of depressive symptoms up to three-year post stroke. Journal of  Rehabilitation Medicine, 41, 930-935.

Westbroook, T.D., Maddocks, K., Andersen, B.L. (2016). The relation of illness perceptions to stress, depression, and fatigue in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Psychology & Health, 31(7), 891-902. doi: 10.1080/08870446.2016.1158259.

Pihlaja, R,. Uimonen, J., Mustanoja, S., Tatlisumak, T., & Poutianenm E. (2014). Post-stroke fatigue is associated with impaired processing speed and memory functions in first-ever stroke patients. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 77, 380-384.

 

Who are we looking for?

A student with an interest in the psychosocial aspects of chronic somatic diseases

More information?:

Erik Taal

Supervisors:

Dr. Erik Taal & Dr. Christina Bode

Illness perceptions and depression after stroke

Type of assignment:                    BA thesis HPT, 15 EC

Internal or external?:                    internal

Maximum number of students      Yes; 1 student

Individual collecting of data?        data are collected in collaboration with MST

Type of research:                         quantitative


Description of the assignment:

Ischemic stroke is one of the most common causes of morbidity and case fatality in developing countries, leading to impacting consequences in different domains of life. Problems with emotional functioning are reported frequently.  Demographic factors, stroke characteristics and physical impairments are well researched determinants of the decrease in emotional functioning. However, it is suggested that other factors, such as patients’ perceptions of their illness can add to the explanation of individual differences in (emotional) functioning after stroke. 

 

Illness perceptions are the common sense beliefs people have about their illness such as perceptions of the identity, cause, time line, consequences and controllability of their disease.

 

Van Mierlo et al. (2015) studied illness perceptions over time in post stroke patients and found that illness cognitions and changes in illness perceptions were independently associated with one aspect of emotional functioning: life satisfaction of people after stroke.

 

In a collaboration project with the department of neurology of the Medisch Spectrum Twente patients are followed during one year with assessments in the first week after stroke, and after 3, 6, and 12 months. At these time points clinical and radiological data are collected and patients complete questionnaires about depression, illness perceptions and other variables.

The aim of this study is to explore the course of depression during the first year after stroke, to examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between illness perceptions and depression.

Van Mierlo, M.L., van Heugen, C.M., Post, M.W.M., de Kort,, P.L.M., & Visser-Meiily, J.M.A. (2015). Life satisfaction post stroke: The role of illness cognitions. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 79, 137-142.

Schepers, V., Post, M., Visser-Meily, A., & van de Port, I, et al. (2009). Predictors of depressive symptoms up to three-year post stroke. Journal of  Rehabilitation Medicine, 41, 930-935.

Westbroook, T.D., Maddocks, K., Andersen, B.L. (2016). The relation of illness perceptions to stress, depression, and fatigue in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Psychology & Health, 31(7), 891-902. doi: 10.1080/08870446.2016.1158259.

Pihlaja, R,. Uimonen, J., Mustanoja, S., Tatlisumak, T., & Poutianenm E. (2014). Post-stroke fatigue is associated with impaired processing speed and memory functions in first-ever stroke patients. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 77, 380-384.

 

Who are we looking for?

A student with an interest in the psychosocial aspects of chronic somatic diseases

More information?:

Erik Taal

Supervisors:

Dr. Erik Taal & Dr. Christina Bode