MESA+ University of Twente
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Mesa+

2005

Interview with A. Ariando In general it is about the behaviour of Josephson junctions connecting high- and low-temperature superconductors, and the possibilities of using such a structure as new components in superconducting (quantum)-electronics.There is rich physics involved in this kind of structure, and there are many possibilities for applications. Josephson junctions consist of two superconductors that are separated by for example a thin insulating barrier layer... Interview with Boris Bret The main subject of my thesis is multiple light scattering. The multiple light scattering in various materials is nicely illustrated on the cover of my book by the powdered sugar, the whipped egg white and the cauliflower. We are talking about light here; multiple scattering means that the light does not propagate in a straight line but ‘bounces’ around in the material... Interview with Ehtsham Ul Haq Besides an electrical charge, electrons also have a spin. This spin is in two directions, called spin up and spin down. Up to the eighties semiconductor devices were only using the charge property of electrons. Continuous reduction in the size of semiconductor devices allowed to design electronic circuits with improved functionalities... Interview with Erik van Dijk Research into single particles on a nano scale and single molecules has been going on for some time by studying their fluorescence. Unfortunately, there are only few molecules than fluoresce, this seriously limits the range of systems that can be studied. Also fluorescence is comparatively slow -it takes about a nanosecond-, whereas there are a lot of interesting processes that occur on a much faster time scale... Interview with Chuan Liang Feng A bio interface is a sensory material for bio substances. We tried to find the platform that can be used as a bio-interface, meeting several important requirements: it should have high reactivity, it should be easy to produce at a low cost. Besides there was an extra requirement: it should be highly loadable, meaning that for every molecule there should be space... Interview with Alessandro Fornaini I’ll start by explaining something about the title. Medipix is a European collaboration of about 15 institutes all over Europe. Its goal is to develop a new technology for radiographies, basically a new type of instrument to detect X-rays. The reason for this is that with this new technology you need much less (20 times!!) radiation... Interview with Vedran Vonk My research was to study the growth of complex oxide thin films by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) using in-situ X-ray diffraction. Pulsed Laser Deposition is a widely used thin film growth technique, especially in the Mesa labs. With PLD it is possible to grow atomic layer by atomic layer, and the differences in structure between different stages of the growth are so small that in order to measure this you need a very powerful X-ray source: a so-called synchrotron... Interview with Arne Leinse The aim of my thesis was to develop a device to transfer digital signals into optical signals. For that purpose we used a microring in which the light that you guide into it resonates under certain conditions, depending on the wavelength (colour) of light.
The light can exit at an output waveguide when the ring is in resonance...
Interview with Arnout van der Wel To very briefly summarize: it is about noise in transistors. Roughly speaking there are two types of transistors: bipolar transistors and MOSFETs. The latter is most common these days, because the computer industry solely uses MOSFETs, (CMOS technology comprises of two types of MOSFET) and because they are so common, the rest of the industry has also started to use them... Interview with Arno Godeke Niobium-Tin is an interesting superconducting material. The material itself was discovered in 1954 and there is a lot known about it, but for the larger part this knowledge is theoretical and based on idealized, homogeneous samples.
Later the applications came, but their characteristics were rather empirically described and their design was mainly based on trial and error. To my view the link between the theory describing idealized samples and the applications is missing...
Interview with Cazimir Bostan The basic idea was to make a periodic structure (a regular structure) in a high refractive index material, which is silicon. The kind of periodicity is related to the light wavelength you want to propagate. The next step was to create intentionally a fault, a defect in the structure and to guide light through the structure by means of the defect, thus creating an optical circuit. The sample we made comprises three layers: the top layer of silicon, below the insulator (silicon oxide) and the silicon substrate... Interview with Douwe Geuzebroek It is about integrated optics, meaning that we try to make chips that are not based on an electrical currents but on the guiding of light. A micro ring is a component of such an optical chip. The challenge is to bring the advantages of the bandwidth of glass fibre into peoples’ homes by means of cheap circuits interconnecting the existing glass fibre networks... Interview with Edin Sarajlic This was a part of the micro Scanning Probe Array Memory (microSPAM) project in which three groups participated. The basic idea was to develop a new type of magnetic memory based on microtechnology; small and fast with a low power consumption. The magnetic medium in this memory is placed on tiny squares and accessed with numerous heads underneath, reading and writing the memory in a parallel action... Interview with Emiel Speets The aim of the project is to make patterns on surfaces. These patterns vary in size from real nanolevel to micrometres. We use metals to make these patterns applying techniques like pulsed laser deposition and single molecules deposition. For the single molecule work we had a cooperation with the University of Parma, Italy... Interview with Fréderic Mertins My thesis is about producing syngas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) from methane. To do so I used a membrane composed of a ceramic material with the perovskite structure. This structure comprises two metal cations and three oxygen anions. By fine-tuning the compositions of this material, it is possible to have a small oxygen deficiency, which is the feature of interest in my case... Interview with Henri Uranus When we have a high index core medium we can trap the light, but recently other ways have been found: for instance in photonic crystal and anti-resonant waveguides, cladding with periodic (air) holes or layers have been used to guide light, even with a low index core. I did the modelling on those structures... Interview with Kirankuar Hiremath I participated in de NAIS project, a European project in which Science and Technology have joined forces to optimize the optics based technologies for dense wavelength division multiplexing/demultiplexing. It is all about taking the large bandwidth optical fibre based networks to peoples’ computers and other household devices in order to take full advantage of its high speed features... Interview with Igor Korczagin The main goal of this thesis was to investigate materials that we could use in surface patterning and later apply them in lithography: polymeric materials we could use to circumvent the photolithography. The photolithography equipment is very expensive and it has got its limitations as well... Interview with Joris van Lith My research was about the development of a specific type of sensor: an integrated optical sensor. These sensors are developed on optical chips making use of the properties of light instead of electrical currents. The microscale of these chips opens up a range of possibilities that are unthinkable with for instance the manipulation of light with lenses, for on this very small scale the conventional laws of light (light as a beam) are no longer valid... Interview with Monica Brivio First of all: lab-on-a-chip is a very new project. It has a very famous parent related to it: the MicroTAS (Micro Total Analysis System) project, which involved the miniaturization of the analytical instrumentation while lab-on-a-chip is aimed at applications in organic chemistry... Interview with Riaan Schmulz The current microfluidic devices comprise mostly one plane. I have found a way to enable communication between different planes. So you do not need to have all the components parallel, but can also go up - thus stacking the components on top of each other. A gate is obviously something you can open or close at will... Interview with Sankhanilay Roy Chowdhury It was mainly a chemical engineering project, with some material science. The idea of the project was to recover the catalyst from a complex reaction in order to use the catalyst again. This is for economic reasons important to industry, the metal ions, they use are expensive to make. So the aim was to at least recover 90 % of the catalyst, within a reasonable time span... Interview with Sebastiaan Herber This was a project in collaboration with the Medisch Spectrum Twente hospital. Dr Kolkman is a gastro-enterologist who wanted to measure CO2 in the stomach and contacted professor Piet Bergveld.
CO2 in the stomach is in indication of ischemia of the stomach (poor blood circulation results in lack of oxygen and consequently high CO2 levels inside the stomach, a very serious albeit not very common disease)...
Interview with Shan Zou Basically and simply put I have been measuring the forces between individual molecules, as well as complexes, i.e. small objects. I have also measured the mechanical properties of single polymer chains, using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).
Because it is a big help if you know the properties of a single chain, when you design a new material with certain properties...
Interview with Sheela Sowariraj We tackled the problem of static electricity in the housed chips. Static charge accumulation results in voltage difference. We can feel the presence of static charge only when the voltage drop is above 3000V. The static discharge happens in a very short time span (fraction of a millisecond). ICs (chips) encounter static charge during different stages of their production while being handled or transported... Interview with Nikodem Tomczak The main objective of my PhD research was to develop new experimental methods based on single molecule fluorescence detection and spectroscopy to probe polymers on the nanoscale. In particular, my research was concentrated on polymer dynamics in confinement such as in thin films (used often in such areas as standard lithography)... Interview with Fijs van Leeuwen Radioactive material does not only occur in the waste of nuclear plants, but one of the main sources actually is the environment we live in. One example is the naturally occurring radioactive element uranium and its decay products. For example, when drilling for oil saline well water, holding decay products of uranium e.g. radium, is pumped to the surface together with the crude oil, releasing these elements in to the environment...