Send e-mails to large groups

INTRODUCTION

Below an explanation is given regarding the rules concerning sending e-mail to large groups within the UT. An explanation is also given about phishing e-mail.

CONTENTS

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Sending e-mails to large groups of student or Employees

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E-mails in which your user name and/or password is/are asked for.

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Receiving responses (or out-of-office replies) to a message that you have sent under your own name, whilst you did not send this message yourself.

SENDING E-MAILS TO LARGE GROUPS OF STUDENT OR EMPLOYEES

Very often UT employees or students want to send an e-mail to large groups of UT students and/or employees. If this serves an educational or commercial purpose, there are various options for this. Before this type of e-mail can be sent, a request has to be submitted to the Centre for Educational Support (CES) for e-mail to be sent to students, or the Human Resources (HR) for e-mail to be sent to employees. The CES or HR will assess the request and (in consultation with the LISA) will send the e-mail.

Within exchange, measures have been taken to prevent bulk e-mails. If someone wishes to send an e-mail to more than 750 people within one hour, that is only possible if exchange email lists are used. In that case, the e-mail may not exceed 50 MB. This e-mail list can be requested from: The Service Desk ICT.

All e-mails to large groups of students or employees that are not sent in accordance with the procedure outlined above will initially be considered to be spam. LISA will then contact the sender and will take the appropriate actions to prevent a repeat.

In any case, please remember the following: To err is human. If you receive an e-mail that, in your opinion is spam, forward this to the LISA using the address abuse@utwente.nl, outlining your complaint.

E-MAILS IN WHICH YOUR USER NAME AND/OR PASSWORD IS/ARE ASKED FOR.

Unfortunately, recently the UT has been deluged a number of times by e-mail in which students and employees were asked for log-in details. These were sent, for example, by the so-called “webmail administrators”. Among other things, by including the URL of the webmail site (http://xs.utwente.nl), an attempt was made to give this e-mail an official appearance. However, these e-mails were sent by people with malicious intentions, who were attempting to obtain log-in details from students and/or employees in order to misuse these.

The UT/LISA will NEVER ask employees and students to provide account details by e-mail. These e-mails are therefore always an attempt to gain information for misuse!

Should you receive this type of e-mail, please forward this to LISA at the address abuse@utwente.nl. LISA will then undertake action and will possibly also report this to the police.

If you have nevertheless accidentally responded to this type of e-mail, you should immediately change your password and contact the Service Desk ICT.

RECEIVING RESPONSES (OR OUT-OF-OFFICE REPLIES) TO A MESSAGE THAT YOU HAVE SENT UNDER YOUR OWN NAME, WHILST YOU DID NOT SEND THIS MESSAGE YOURSELF.

This scenario has also recently occurred quite often: You receive a(n) (angry) from someone to a spam e-mail that you are supposed to have sent. Or you receive out-of-office replies from people to whom you personally haven't sent an e-mail. Unfortunately, little can be done about this.

In a sense, e-mail works in the same way as ‘paper-based post'. On the reverse of a letter, someone can write a random sender without this being checked. Responses are then sent to the address that is provided.

Often a false sender address is provided by spammers. They do this for 2 reasons:

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The e-mail seems to have been sent from a trusted source and it is therefore more likely that this will be read.

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The false address means that the spammer is more difficult to find. In many cases, sending spam messages is illegal.

Actually you do not need to inform the LISA of these types of e-mails. If this happens on a small scale, we are able to do little about it, and if this happens on a large scale, this is spotted anyway by the LISA. We then try to find the source, so that if possible this can be reported to the police.

If you receive an angry response from an acquaintance who thinks that you have sent him/her a spam message, it would of course be sensible to let them know that you were not the sender of the message. The comparison with paper-based mail will often help you with this explanation.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW MORE?

You will find more information about security, spam, viruses and phishing e-mail on the LISA website. The link to this website is at the bottom of the page. We will continue to add to and update this information. You can also download a virus scanner for home use.

Should you have any other questions, please contact the Service Desk ICT.