PCS

A Techno-Economic analysis of photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting for the production of hydrogen and H2O2

Among others solar energy can be converted into chemical energy in photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. Water splitting to hydrogen and oxygen is commonly investigated as hydrogen is a high energy density fuel that can be utilized without pollution during combustion. Still the PEC approach to split water for the production of hydrogen and oxygen is challenging and an economically unfeasible process. It is suggested that hydrogen peroxide, instead of oxygen, could be co-produced to increase feasibility. This research will be a techno-economic analysis of photoelectrochemical water splitting for the production of hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide.  

The technical part will be a literature review of possible technological production processes for the PEC cell water splitting into hydrogen and H2O2. From this technical part a couple of technological scenarios will emerge which will be economically analyzed to find the economic impact and feasibility of the suggested technology. The impact of several technical and economical parameters on the results will be analyzed to find the sensitivity towards these parameters. The eventual goal is to find the technical and economical obstacles that have to be overcome to make the process a solution for the future fuel and chemical problems.    

The techno-economic viability study will be done in collaboration with the Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development of the Utrecht University lead by Prof. dr. Gert Jan Kramer. This institute will provide guidance and the analytical framework used to analyze energy systems as discussed in this research.