Short CV

Born: May 20, 1970 in Rimouski, Québec, Canada
Nationality: Canadian.

EDUCATION

  • Ph.D. in Physics, Cornell University, USA, 1998. Thesis title: "Spatially resolved measurements of charge-density-wave transport".
  • B.A.Sc. in Electrical Engineering with Minor in Physics, Universiy of Waterloo, Canada, 1993

EMPLOYMENT

  • 2009-present: Professor, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology & Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, The Netherlands
  • 2008-2010: Professor, 3TU Center of Excellence Chair in Nanotechnological Biophysics, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
  • 2006-2008: Associate Professor in the section Molecular Biophysics, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
  • 2001-2006: Assistant Professor in the section Molecular Biophysics, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
  • 1999-2001: Postdoc in the section Quantum Transport, Department of Applied Physics, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
  • 1994-1998: Research Assistant in Robert Thorne's group, Cornell University, USA.
  • 1993-1994: Teaching Assistant in the department of physics, Cornell University, USA.
  • 1989-1993: 23 months of industrial work experience with IBM, CAE Electronics, Bell-Northern Research and Northern Telecom (co-operative education program).

CURRENT RESEARCH TOPICS

  • Electrochemical nanofluidics: stochastic & single-molecule detection
  • High-frequency electrical detection in liquid
  • Electroosmosis in ionic liquids
  • Nanofluidic sensors based on redox enzymes
  • Microfluidic-enabled scanning probes

PREVIOUS RESEARCH TOPICS

  • Ionic screening: charge inversion and DNA condensation by multivalent ions
  • Fundamentals of electrophoresis using solid-state nanopores
  • Carbon nanotubes as charge sensors in solution
  • Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) on carbon nanotubes
  • Collective electronic transport properties of charge-density-wave (CDW) conductors
  • Synchrotron radiation studies of microscopic charge-density-wave (CDW) dynamics
  • Defect formation during protein crystal growth