See Digital Competence Center (DCC network)

Information about our Monthly Theme

every month the dcc picks a subject to put in the spotlight: our monthly theme. there will be information available about that theme on our website, a newsletter will be sent out with additional information, and we organize an interactive session around that theme at the end of each month.

The DCC thematic sessions will be organized on Tuesdays -16:00-17:00 - every last week of the month starting from October 2021.

THIS MONTH'S THEME: 'Research life cycle, ICT & support'

After a nice summer break, the University of Twente’s DCC thematic sessions are back with full energy and with new interesting topics. After the summer break, we had the fourth thematic session in September about 'UT DCC: What’s in it for me?'. The recordings and the presentations of the thematic session can be found on the UT DCC webpage.

The DCC is happy to announce its fifth thematic session to you! On Tuesday, October 26th, from 16:00-17:00, the next DCC thematic session will take place. The theme of this month is dedicated to the support of ICT and the thematic session is titled “ Research Life Cycle, ICT & Support”.

DCC is a hub translating the needs of researchers into innovative ICT and RDM support services. For more information about this topic, visit our website.

The program of this sessions is as follows:

16:00-16:05  

Opening

16:05-16:45 

ICT Account Managers will talk about their role on the Research Life Cycle and How ICT Account Managers support researchers during this journey starting from the preparation to the long term preservation and archiving. They will present about the tools and services that they developed to make this a pleasant researcher-oriented journey in the different stages of the Research Life Cycle.

The tools and services to be covered during the thematic session are Data Management Plan (DMP) tool, Decision Tree tool (where can I store/share, or how can I transfer data during my research), Content Collaboration Platform (CCP), and last but not least AREDA (Achieve REsearch DAta).

16:45-17:00

Discussion, Q&A, closing

A short description of these services:

DMP tool:

The DMP-tool is the UT tool for writing your data management plan (DMP) and the notification of the processing of personal data in research in compliance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR registration).

The DMP part of the DMP-tool has a generally accepted structure that complies to the policy of funders like NWO and ZonMw. The EU allows you to deliver a DMP based on this form as well. 

Decision Tree Tool:

WHERE CAN I STORE/SHARE, OR HOW CAN I TRANSFER DATA DURING MY RESEARCH?

The University of Twente has an overall policy on how to handle research data. This policy serves as a starting point for tailored data policies of faculties and/or institutes, and research groups. It becomes clear when you read the Research Support website and by answering the questions inside the UT DMPtool which requirements are set for services with regard to transfer, store or share research data during your research.  These requirements can be used to answer the questions in the decision tree 'storage of research data'. As result a list of services offered by LISA will be shown.

This decision tree can be found at https://webapps.utwente.nl/dmp/fr/RDM/Storage-Decision-Tree/new

CCP: A Content Collaboration Platform (CCP) is a platform for storing, sharing and collaborating on research data with other researchers. Together with researchers, LISA is building a CCP as an ICT service. Nextcloud is a CCP. The research data is stored in the UT data center (which is ISO27001 and NEN7510 certified storage).

AREDA: Areda (Archive REsearch DAta) is the University of Twente archive for the long-term storage of static data collected, generated or used in UT research projects. But archiving is more than just storing data after your research. Metadata must be added, so datasets can be findable, whereas proper documentation is needed for interpretation and verification, as well as interoperability and reuse of the data. Therefore Areda is linked to the UT research information system (Pure), for adding metadata, while documentation can be included in a README file.

We hope to see all of you on the 26th! Register via our events page, to make sure you won’t miss it!

Last month's theme and previous themes 

  • Last month's theme: 'UT DCC: WHAT IS IN IT FOR ME?'

    After a nice summer break, the University of Twente’s DCC thematic sessions are back with full energy and with new interesting topics. Before the summer break, we had the third thematic session in June about 'FAIR Data & Good Practice of Science'. If you are interested in reading a short summary of this thematic session, you can read the blog post on the 4TU.ResearchData community platform.

    For September’s theme, we hosted a thematic session which was about Digital Competence Center (DCC) itself. The session aimed to create more awareness on DCC and what kind of support services are available in there for the researchers. DCC has the mission to translate needs of researchers into innovative ICT & RDM support services in their shared journey towards Open Science – from Science 1.0 to Science 2.0. Furthermore, during this journey towards Open Science,  DCC acts as a hub for expertise on open science- especially FAIR data and open access, digitalization of science and research ICT facilities. For more information about research support, visit the UT Research Support service portal

    On September 28, a thematic session was hosted by the UT-DCC. You can find the links to the recording and presentations here:

    RECORDING AND PRESENTATIONS SEPTEMBER 28TH

    RECORDING

    PRESENTATION

    The DCC thematic session was divided into three sections. First, we focused on the purpose and organizational units of DCC and the added value for researchers and support staff through a presentation by our data steward, FAIR Data, Zafer Öztürk. Hereby, we would like to acknowledge our information specialist Marit van Eck, BMS for the preparation of these beautiful slides regarding RDM support organization at UT DCC and for giving consent to use and share.

    Afterwards, we continued with our data stewards team. Within your faculty, data stewards are the first contact point for Research Data Management related matters, such as handling your data in day-to-day practice, writing a data policy for a group or filling in a data management plan for a research proposal. The interactive part of the thematic session took place through a poll where researchers voted their topic of interests from a list of questions that our data stewards prepared among the RDM related questions they receive regularly. These questions were ranging from how to handle personal data to data management in grants, how to document data to what to do with the data after research.  

    The last part of the session was dedicated to ICT account managers and their role in research support and furthermore the support services they provide such as CCP (Content Collaboration Platform), AREDA (Archive REsearch DAta), and IoT (Internet of Things).

    A short description of these services:

    CCP: A Content Collaboration Platform (CCP) is a platform for storing, sharing and collaborating on research data with other researchers. Together with researchers, LISA is building a CCP as an ICT service. Nextcloud is a CCP. The research data is stored in the UT data center (which is ISO27001 and NEN7510 certified storage).

    AREDA: Areda (Archive REsearch DAta) is the University of Twente archive for the long-term storage of static data collected, generated or used in UT research projects. But archiving is more than just storing data after your research. Metadata must be added, so datasets can be findable, whereas proper documentation is needed for interpretation and verification, as well as interoperability and reuse of the data. Therefore Areda is linked to the UT research information system (Pure), for adding metadata, while documentation can be included in a README file.

    IoT and 5G: Introduction into the possibilities for 5G private network testing on campus and IoT research in collaboration with T-mobile.

    When?

    On September 28, from 16:00-17:00 o’clock, a DCC thematic session about this topic will be organized for all of you. The program will be as follows:


    16:00-16:05 

    Opening

    16:05-16:15

    Zafer Öztürk, Data Steward FAIR Data will give a short introduction on DCC and the added value for researchers and support staff, its purpose and its organizational units.

    16:15-16:30

    Team Data Stewards respond to frequently asked questions, among which the participants will have an option to choose. The questions range from different sections of research life cycle such as data management support on DMPs, NWO and Horizon Europe research data management sections, data storage options, data documentation, FAIR Data and more.

    16:30-16:35

    Discussion, Q&A

    16:35-16:50


    Team ICT Account Managers will talk about innovative services and tools that they have developed in collaboration with UT Researchers such as AREDA (preserving data at UT), IoT (Internet of Things) and CCP (Content Collaboration Platform). Can you advise them on the further developments?

    16:50-17:00

    Discussion, Q&A, closing

  • Previous themes

    September

    'Fair data & good practice of science

    In May (see previous themes), we’ve learned more about the preservation of data, during and after your research. For more information about that session, read the blog post on the 4TU.researchdata community platform! An interesting topic, but there is more behind it, so one month wasn’t enough to explore all that. Therefore we’ve chosen this month’s topic to be about data again, but this time about FAIR data. FAIR stands for Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable. A nice introduction to this topic has been given by Maastricht University in this video. Preservation of research data contributes to the quality and impact of your scientific work because it enables verification and possible reuse, for instance for further analysis or follow-up, new research, or as a contribution to a data resource for the scientific community.

    On June 28, a thematic session about this topic was hosted by the UT-DCC. You can find the links to the recording and presentations here:

    There has been a tremendous increase in the amount of research data and hence, there is an emerging urge to benefit from the published research data at most in the digital era of science as stated by Wilkinson et al.. FAIR Data principles come into prominence as guidelines for researchers to make their research data FAIR, with an ultimate goal of making the data available for reusability both by humans and machines as initiated by Force 11.

    Why?

    In the realm of digitalization and the immense increase in the amount of published research data, FAIR principles guide the academic community to make their research data FAIR and therefore, supporting discovery and innovation. Following FAIR data principles brings many benefits to the academic community as well as to individual researchers, research organizations, and funders:

    • Achieving maximum potential from data assets.
    • Achieving maximum impact from research.
    • Increasing the visibility and citations of research.
    • Improving transparency in research and thus,  enabling reproducibility, applicability, and reliability of research.
    • Speeding up discoveries and revealing new insights into the research, thus facilitating new research questions to be answered.
    • Staying aligned with international standards and approaches.
    • Attracting new partnerships with researchers, business, policy, and broader communities.
    • Staying up to date with new innovative research approaches and tools.

    When?

    On June 28, from 10:00-11:00 o’clock, a DCC thematic session about this topic will be organized for all of you. The program will be as follows:

    10:05-10:20 Associate Professor Luiz Bonino da Silva Santos, who is also international technology coordinator at the Go FAIR initiative, will talk about the current state of FAIR based on its’ first starting point in 2014 which results in the first FAIR paper published in Nature in 2016 and the developments in the field since then.

    10:20-10:30 Discussion, Q&A

    10:30-10:45 Dr. Ria Wolkorte & Dr. Michelle Kip will present their current work, their interest in Citizen Science, and how their road crossed with FAIR Data through the FAIR Data Fund from 4TU.ResearchData

    10:45-11:00 Discussion, Q&A, closing

    We hope to see all of you on the 28thRegister via our events page, to make sure you won't miss it!


    May

    'What to do with the data after your research?'

    The presentation and recordings of the thematic session held on May 31st about this topic can be found here:

    The recording of the first part of the session and the 4TU demo (demo starts at 41:20):

    The DANS demo:

    In the UT research data management policy it is stated that research data, especially underlying publications, should be Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Re-usable (FAIR-principles). Preservation of research data contributes to the quality and impact of your scientific work because it enables verification and possible reuse, for instance for further analysis or follow-up, new research, or as a contribution to a data resource for the scientific community. Preservation of data is also needed in case of a data publication: a journal article about a specific data set. Preferably during, but no later than 1 month after finishing the research, selected data and related materials can be deposited in Areda, the UT data archive. Find more information about handling the data after your research on the UT RDM website

    Apart from archiving in Areda you can deposit your data sets in a trusted repository. In these repositories, you can make your data (openly) available for others. The preferred trusted data repositories are:

    • 4TU.ResearchData for depositing technical and natural sciences data
    • DANS for depositing research data from the humanities, health sciences, social and behavioral sciences, oral history, and spatial sciences.

    In this month's thematic session we will tell and show you more on handling your research data after your research. First, one of our data stewards: Simone Fricke, will tell you more about the benefits of preserving your data. Next, she will interview Kostas Nizamis, assistant professor in multidisciplinary design, about how he handled the research data after his research. Of course, there is time to ask your questions about this topic as well! In the second part of the session, you get the chance to follow a demo from one of two data repositories: DANS and 4TU.researchdataQian Zhang, BMS and ITC data steward, will give a demo about the DANS repository and Connie Clare, community manager of 4TU.researchdata, will show you how to deposit your dataset in that repository. 

    Are you interested in this topic and do you want to learn more? Register for the DCC thematic session here

    Questioning why it is important to think about what to do with the data after your research? Maybe this simple, yet accurate video will help you figure it out!

    See you on the 31st

    April

    On Monday April 19th, the first online thematic session has been scheduled! There were two presentations about different cloud computing platforms. We invited Serkan Girgin to give a presentation about ITC’s cloud computing platform CRIB. Secondly, Ralph Mettinkhof from LISA presented the new Virtual Research Environment (VRE) that was developed recently.

    The recording of this month's session can be found at the DCC intranet page

    The presentations from this month's session:

    Of course, there are more platforms that make use of cloud computing than just the two that we present here. We are aware of that, and acknowledge that our overview isn't complete. Nevertheless, we think it is important to provide you with information about the two platforms that are available for UT researchers and presented by their developers in our thematic session. 

    CRIB PLATFORM

    Based on the user needs assessment Serkan Girgin from ITC, designed and implemented a computing infrastructure to serve high-priority activities related to big geodata, including exploratory research, prototyping, and self-learning. Feel free to use it also for other geospatial computing needs! 

    The default interface of the platform is JupyterLab, which enables you to work with interactive notebooks and documents through text and code editors, terminals, and other custom components (e.g. map widgets). If you are new to JupyterLab (or Jupyter notebooks in general), a good starting point is its official documentation, which includes a detailed user guide. There is also a nice and short (~ 6 min.) introduction video available. For specific components integrated into the platform (e.g. Code Server), please refer to their own documentation. The platform has kernels for Python (3.6), R (4.0), Go (1.15), Julia (1.5), Java (11), Scala (2.12), PHP (7.4), Ruby (2.7), Octave (6.1), dot (2.43), Gnuplot (5.2) which you can use in interactive notebooks. All these languages are also accessible through the terminal interface. By using the terminal you can also use C (GNU 9.3), C++ (GNU 9.3), Fortran (GNU 9.3), Perl (5.30), and CUDA (10.2). A complete list of system packages (including low-level libraries, e.g. OpenBLASATLASPROJGDAL, etc.) and language-specific packages (e.g. Python and R packages) are listed under the public/platform folder on the platform.

    Cloud computing provides wonderful opportunities for education, research, and capacity development activities. However, it is a rapidly evolving technology and it is quite challenging to follow the progress. We want to help you with this and keep you informed about the recent developments in cloud computing technology, especially at UT. For more information and registering for the CRIB newsletter, visit their website

    VIRTUAL RESEARCH ENVIRONMENT

    Cloud service providers are racing to add more features to their platforms, which become more and more extensive, but complex at the same time. Especially if you are a new user, it is really challenging to set up your computing environment and some support is required at the beginning.

    Considering this need, LISA in collaboration with 2at started a new service: Virtual Research Environment (VRE). VRE provides an easy-to-use interface that makes it easier to acquire, set up, and manage digital workspaces for research in Microsoft Azure. The service is based on F-series virtual machines, which can be scaled up and down according to needs. Each machine also features ready-to-use software (e.g. Matlab, SPSS, Python, R) on Windows environment. The service is designed according to the UT budget workflow and you only need an OFI number to start using it! Check the VRE portal for more information and documentation.