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Organization and information

At the UT, several people within various departments work in HSE management. You can find them under Organization. The 'Tasks, responsibilities and authorities within the UT' memo describes who is responsible for what when it comes to HSE. In addition, you can look at the overviews with positions to see who fills which HSE-related position in your faculty or unit and who your contact person is.

Information about the Dutch legislation on working conditions and other relevant work-related topics can be found under Information.

Information

On this page, you will find information about the Dutch legislation on working conditions and other workplace-related topics.

Working conditions catalogue

The Dutch Working Conditions Act gives sector organizations the freedom to jointly draw up a sector-level working conditions catalogue (arbocatalogus). It describes instruments, methods and solutions for the most important work-related health risks in the sector. By drawing up a working conditions catalogue themselves, employers and employees have a greater influence on the enforcement policies of the Dutch Labour Inspectorate. The Association of Universities of the Netherlands (VSNU), consisting of all fourteen Dutch universities, and the employees' organizations have been working on a university working conditions catalogue since 2007. This catalogue is divided into nine subcatalogues:

  • Psychosocial workload (PSA)
  • Complaints of Arm, Neck and/or Shoulder (CANS)
  • Hazardous substances
  • Emergency assistance (bedrijfshulpverlening, BHV)
  • Information, training & supervision (VO&T)
  • Hazard identification and risk assessment (RI&E)
  • Laboratory animal allergy

You can find the Dutch-language working conditions catalogue (Dutch only) on the VSNU website.

Working conditions legislation

Ever since the Dutch Working Conditions Act (Arbowet) was revised in 1994, health, safety and well-being in the workplace have received considerable attention. The act obliges all employers - thus including the University of Twente - to list and assess all the risks posed by the working conditions. Based on this list, plans need to be made to eliminate the identified risks.

Dutch law on working conditions is mainly stipulated in one act (Working Conditions Act), one decree (Working Conditions Decree) and one so-called 'ministerial' set of regulations (Working Conditions Regulations). We will first discuss the Working Conditions Act, which can be regarded as a framework for all the other working condition-related legislation and is therefore also referred to as a Framework Act (raamwet). The Working Conditions Act includes provisions on the following subjects, among others:

  • the employer's general duties;
  • the employee's general duties;
  • consultation duties (e.g. with the employee representation);
  • duties towards experts (e.g. the relationship to a Health and Safety service);
  • Labour Inspectorate legal possibilities

More specific provisions have been laid down in the Working Conditions Decree, a so-called 'implementation decree'. The Working Conditions Decree has the status of order in council (Algemene Maatregel van Bestuur). The former ministerial regulations have been put together to form the Working Conditions Regulations.

Apart from the provisions as stipulated in the Working Conditions Act, the Working Conditions Decree and the Working Conditions Regulations, additional policy rules have been developed. These rules are indicative and show how the legal provisions can be interpreted.

The legislation on working conditions not only has consequences for the University of Twente in its role as employer, but also for you in your role as employee.

WORKING CONDITIONS ACT: EMPLOYER'S DUTIES

The Working Conditions Act obliges employers to pursue a working conditions policy. When doing so, the following guiding principles apply:

  • Customized health and safety: the measures to be taken need to be attuned to the risks for the employees' health, safety and well-being as present in the job;
  • Collaboration: the employer and the employees have to work together on improving the working conditions;
  • Structured approach: there has to be a structured approach, with the prevention of problems as one of the key themes.

Under the Directorate for HR's guidance, a structured approach to occupational health and safety management has been developed at the University of Twente.

At the UT, each department or unit has their own specific risks regarding health, safety and well-being. Therefore, an important part of the UT's approach to this health and safety management is shaped within the units. This is why the responsibility for health, safety and environment has been delegated to the faculty deans and the department directors. Each of the faculties or units also has their own Health, Safety and Environment Coordinator (AMC). The Executive Board, however, has the final responsibility for the health, safety and environment policy pursued.

Listing the most important risks forms the basis for the structured approach (occupational health and safety management system). To this end, all units have undergone a so-called hazard identification and risk assessment (RI&E). As a result of this RI&E, the necessary measures - both at unit and at university level - are planned and executed either on the short or on the long term.

WORKING CONDITIONS ACT: EMPLOYEE'S DUTIES

In order to create optimum working conditions, the involvement of employees is, of course, highly important. Therefore, consultations between the employer and the employees are crucial. But it is also important to note that employees, too, carry responsibility for safe working conditions and that they can be held liable at law for any negligence.

Roughly outlined, the employee's responsibilities are as follows:

  • the duty to use machinery, hazardous substances, tools, etc. in a correct and therefore safe manner;
  • the duty to cooperate in information and training sessions;
  • the duty to deal with the company's safety precautions in the correct manner;
  • the duty to use necessary (personal) protective equipment placed at the employee's disposal in the correct manner;
  • the duty to immediately report unsafe and/or unhealthy working conditions to the manager.

In addition, you, as an employee, are of course fully entitled to be working under conditions that are as safe and healthy as possible, you have the right to obtain all necessary information, to be working with the necessary safety precautions in place and to discuss health and safety matters with your employer.

Working conditions and environmental regulations UT

1.These regulations apply to all those present on the premises, in the buildings or at the installations of the University of Twente, or carrying out or having carried out, activities or experiments at these locations.

2.The Executive Board –as formal employer– has the final responsibility for safety, health, well-being and environment within the UT. These responsibilities have been delegated to deans, research directors and heads of department in accordance with memorandum 353.835/PA&O.

3.In the event of fire and/or an accident (053-4892222 should be phoned immediately, stating the location and, if possible, the extent and nature of the calamity or accident. If present, the manual fire alarm must be activated.

4.In all UT buildings smoking is prohibited, both in public spaces and in all workplaces.  All buildings display signs at their entrances indicating that the smoking ban is in effect within them. If a smoking area is available within or near to the building, the sign will state where it is.

5.For one’s own and other people’s safety, health and well-being as well as in the interest of the environment, everyone must exercise utmost care.

6.Everyone must observe the prohibition, warning and other signs installed by or on behalf of the Executive Board and/or the faculty/department or third persons and the indications, instructions, guidelines and regulations given or provided by the Executive Board, faculty/department or third persons.

7.Everyone is responsible for the separate collection of workplace refuse in the appropriate paper and other waste containers.

8.Hazardous waste must be collected in accordance with the UT guideline Collection Hazardous materials.

9.It is prohibited to discharge hazardous materials into the sewer.

10.Those instructing others to perform specific activities, must

  • make the necessary inquiries beforehand as to the possible dangers associated with the activities
  • pass on this knowledge to the other persons beforehand. If necessary, new information or altered insights regarding these dangers must be passed on immediately to those involved.

Similar obligations regarding making (continued) inquiries relevant to the risk of danger apply to the persons carrying out the work. Making inquiries after the possible dangers includes inquiring after possible or necessary measures to prevent danger or to minimise the risk of danger. For making inquiries you can consult the UT’s working conditions and environmental coordinator (AMC) of the faculty or department and the UT’s Human Resources.

11.Accidents, incidents and dangerous situations must be reported immediately to Human Resources by means of the Registration form for accidents, incidents and dangerous situations. This form can be obtained at the HR website.

12.Anyone who is of the opinion that a dangerous situation is present, or that there is a lack of sufficient security somewhere, is obliged to report this. For this is also the Registration form for accidents, incidents and dangerous situations to be used.

13.Reparations and changes to the electrical installations may only be performed by competent persons authorised to do so by or on behalf of the Executive Board.

14.Purchasing, installing and relocating general fire safety equipment may only be done by the general and technical services department.

15.When materials, cupboards, pieces of work, tools and suchlike are installed or put in place and relocated, pathways, exits, stairs, access to switches, fireman’s material and other safety equipment must be kept free. Escape routes must at all times be kept unblocked.

16.It is prohibited by law to purchase and/or handle equipment and/or materials that radiate ionising beams without having obtained prior permission. Permission can only be obtained via the security officer of Human Resources.

17.It is prohibited by law to purchase and/or handle with genetically modified organisms without having obtained prior permission. Permission can only be obtained via the Biological safety officer (BVF) of the UT.

18.Without permission of the head of the building, it is not allowed to stay in the buildings outside of the regular working hours applicable to the building. Individual rules may be set for each building individually. For information you can refer to the HSE/Building administrator of your faculty or department.

19.Life tests and experiments that incidentally are carried out outside regular working hours, must be reported to the HSE of your faculty or department, or in accordance with the internal procedure of the faculty.

20.Responsibilities ensuing from the working conditions and environmental regulations may involve other persons that have a joint responsibility. This must be laid down formally in writing. These persons who have a joint responsibility may lay down additional working conditions rules applicable in their field. These working conditions rules are not to be inconsistent with the working conditions and environmental regulations and must be submitted for permission to the relevant person responsible for working conditions. These subsequently approved rules must be brought to the notice of Human Resources.

21.With regard to specific subjects the Executive Board has formulated further guidelines, regulations and provisions.

These subjects include:

modified organisms;

For information and advice in the area of working conditions and environment you can refer to the HSE of the faculty / department or Human Resources.

Organization

At the UT, several people within various departments work in HSE management. The 'Tasks, responsibilities and authorities within the UT' memo describes who is responsible for what when it comes to HSE. In addition, you can look at the overviews with positions to see who fills which HSE-related position in your faculty or unit and who your contact person is.

Health, safety and environment (HSE) policy

INTRODUCTION

As the employer, the Executive Board of the UT is responsible for pursuing a proper health, safety and environment (HSE) policy. In order to do so, both an internal and an external HSE organization were set up several years ago. The so-called Arbo- en Milieudienst (AMD) was the party responsible for HSE at the internal level.

As of 1 January 1998, Dutch universities have been obliged to call in support from an internal or external certified Health and Safety service when implementing their working conditions and sickness absence policy. At the time, when considering the possibility of outsourcing several tasks, the Executive Board and the head of AMD decided to set up an external Health and Safety service, named Santar.

On 1 January 1998, the UT entered into a contract with Santar. The Executive Board and the head of AMD/director of Santar decided at the time, partly to keep UT costs down, that AMD would continue to perform all tasks (both the Health and Safety service's and the employer's tasks). The performance of the Health and Safety service's tasks was in the hands of AMD staff (an occupational hygienist, a safety expert, a company doctor and a so-called Arbeids- en Organisatiedeskundige, a type of Health and Safety adviser also involved in effective organization make-up and sickness absenteeism prevention training ) and was in conformity with Santar's quality system.

Now, after having been merged with the so-called Human Resources, AMD is part of Human Resources. All of AMD's executive tasks have been transferred to Santar, except for the task of training prospective emergency assistance (Dutch: BHV) staff.

On 7 May 2012, the name 'AMD' changed into HumanCapitalCare Arbozorg B.V. (HCC). The change of name followed on the takeover of Santar by Health and Safety service HumanCapitalCare in 2011.

In 2018 the new Health and Safety service provider is Arbounie. 

The table below includes an overview listing both Arbounie and HR's HSE tasks. In the overview, a distinction is made between tasks to be performed by the Health and Safety service (those which are part of the basic package of services a certified Health and Safety service has to provide) and other tasks (to be performed by the employer). The HR tasks on the one hand involve offering support to the Executive Board, while on the other offering support to the units (the administrators and the so-called AMCs, the Working Conditions and Environment Coordinators), although in the latter case, the tasks performed are often at a higher organizational level.

The tasks to be performed by Arbounie have been laid down in a service provision agreement. Some tasks, Arbounie performs as part of the agreement, but tasks which are not part of the agreement are only performed upon acceptance of a quotation.

HR AND ARBOUNIE TASKS REGARDING HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TWENTE

Health and Safety service tasks

Task

Performed by*)

Comments

1

Providing reintegration assistance

Arbounie


Conducting a sickness absence analysis is part of the agreement.

2

Holding consulting hours on the topic of working conditions

Arbounie


Employees are entitled to attend the Health and Safety service's consulting hours during working hours.

3

Validating the hazard identification and risk assessment (RI&E)

Arbounie
(quotation)

The employer is permitted to conduct the RI&E himself, but he is obliged to submit the written report to the Health and Safety service. The service then checks whether the analysis was conducted in a 'proper and systematic' manner and consequently draws up a validation statement. In principle, one of the HR key experts (Dutch: kerndeskundigen) may also validate the analysis.

4

Conducting the occupational health medical examination (in Dutch referred to as PAGO/PMO)

Arbounie

(quotation)

The employer is obliged to give employees who are exposed to health risks (e.g. physical strains) during the performance of their work the opportunity to undergo PAGO/PMO from time to time. The Health and Safety service is the party to perform this examination. It is the employer who, on the basis of the RI&E and in consultation with each of the employees, decides which employees are to be examined and how often the periodical examination is to take place.

5

Conducting examinations

Arbounie

(quotation)

In some professional groups, the selection procedure requires a medical examination of the candidates. This is, for example, the case when selecting employees who will be dealing with radiation. This examination has to be performed by the Health and Safety service.

Other (employer's) tasks regarding health, safety, and environment, BHV and radiation

6

Offering psychological assistance and doing business social work

Arbounie


7

Planning the 'social medical team consultation' (Dutch: Sociaal Medisch Teamoverleg, a meeting of all of the people involved in individual sickness absenteeism and reintegration)

Arbounie


8

Planning the reintegration conversation between the employer (or direct manager), the employee and a psychologist or coach (Dutch: re-integratie-driegesprek)

Arbounie


9

Providing first aid (Dutch: EHBO)

General practitioner

10

Planning the consultation between the Executive Board and the University Council as well as drawing up the annual report on Arbounie provided services

Arbounie


11

Coordinating the sickness absence policy and keeping it up to date

Registering sickness absenteeism

HR

HR

 

12

Conducting a sickness absence analysis

Arbounie


Every six months, sickness absence analyses are conducted with the help of an automated system. They are used to track bottlenecks both at department and at organizational level.

13

Taking care of health and safety policy/health and safety management system/environmental policy (UT level)

  • Formulating them, coordinating them, supervising them, offering assistance in their implementation and keeping them up to date
  • Preparing the policy: offering assistance in the implementation of legislation and regulations
  • Coordinating and executing health, safety and environment projects
  • Designing and developing the RI&E instrument
  • Preparing and taking care of environmental permit applications
  • Administering permits, including the coordination of the performance of tasks related to granted permits

 

HR

 

HR

 

HR

 

HR

Arbounie

(quotation)

 

 

 

 

HR

 

HR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The units have to conduct the RI&E and report on their findings themselves. HR plays a supporting role in the execution (offering advice) The employer may decide to have Arbounie conduct the RI&E (quotation) Arbounie has to validate the RI&E (see also 3).

14

Pursuing BHV policy (UT level)

  • Coordinating BHV staff and teams (structuring and shaping BHV organization and training BHV staff) (UT level)
  • Keeping the emergency crisis plan up to date and organizing dry runs

 

HR

 

HR

15

Pursuing ionizing radiation policy (UT level)

  • Coordinating all ionizing radiation activities (UT level)
  • Preparing and taking care of permit applications regarding radiation
  • Coordinating the performance of tasks related to granted permits
  • Performing meter read-outs and keeping records of the badges for employees working with ionizing radiation

 

HR

HR

 

HR

 

HR

 

 

 

 

 

 

16

Assessing workstations with regards to their compliance with health and safety guidelines, rules and regulations

 

AMC

 

 

 

Arbounie

(quotation)

The assessment of Display Screen Equipment (DSE) workstations can be performed by a UT unit or service department Health, Safety and Environment Coordinator (AMC). HR has published all necessary information.

In case of a large-scale assessment or when measurements need to be taken (of sound or climate, for example), Arbounie can be contacted (quotation). The same can be said for safety assessments (machinery, electricity, etc.)

17

Developing general guidelines/a general policy for specific health, safety and environment themes

HR

18

Registering, analyzing and reporting on accidents (UT level)

HR

19

Assisting AMCs and gearing all UT AMC activities to one another

HR

20

Being or setting up a/the helpdesk for AMCs, the management and individual employees

HR

21

Coordinating AMC meetings

HR

22

Maintaining contacts with competent external authorities such as the Labour Inspectorate (health and safety), the city of Enschede (environment) and the district water board (Dutch Pollution of Surface Waters Act)

HR

23

Offering advice on renovation and new building projects

HR

24

Providing information

HR

 

 

 

Unit

 

 

 

 

Arbounie

(quotation)

This is the task of providing UT-wide information, for example by placing information on the website or by publishing an information leaflet (of how to prevent RSI, for example).

The provision of information to specific staff/students is a task of the relevant unit (for example the AMC). Units can make use of information material developed by HR (the RSI information, for example, also consists of a PowerPoint presentation + video).

Arbounie can be contacted to provide information about several health and safety-related topics.

25

Maintaining contacts with other universities about health, safety and environment (SAAZUNIE)

HR

*) Arbounie = tasks which are part of the agreement concluded by Arbounie and the UT

Arbounie (quotation) = tasks which are not part of the agreement concluded by Arbounie  and the UT; these require the prior request for (and acceptance of) a quotation with Arbounie.

Those responsible for emergency assistance

The 'Health, safety and environment at the UT: towards an optimum organization (353.835/PA&O)' memo shows the responsibility structure for the health, safety and environment policy (HSE) at the UT.

The deans and directors of the directorates and service centres are responsible for HSE at unit level. This includes emergency assistance (bedrijfshulpverlening, BHV). When several units, departments, faculties or third parties are housed in one building, the Executive Board appoints one of the deans/directors as contact person for HSE matters as well as a BHV team.

In the table below, all of the UT buildings are listed with the people responsible for HSE/BHV in each of these buildings and the appointed BHV team taking action in case of a calamity. The table is a substitute for the overview as included in the document with reference 393.516/HR (dated April 2011).

Building

No.

Person responsible within the building

BHV team

Spiegel and Vleugel

2, 3

Director of Financial and Economic Affairs (chair of the Spiegel consultations of tenants)

Spiegel

Carillon

4

Campus manager

Vrijhof

High Pressure Lab

5

Dean of TNW

Carré

Paviljoen

6

Director of the Facility department

Spiegel

Seinhuis

7

Director of LISA

Spiegel

Garage

8

Director of the Facility department

Carré

Citadel

9

Dean of EWI

Waaier

Ravelijn

10

Dean of BMS

Ravelijn

Zilverling

11

Dean of EWI

Waaier

Waaier

12

Director of the Facility department

Waaier

Hal B

13

Director of the Facility department

Waaier

Teehuis

14

Director of LISA

Waaier

Carré

15

Dean of TNW

Carré

Nanolab

16

Dean of EWI

Carré

Technohal

18

Dean of TNW

Carré

Horstcomplex

20-28

Dean of ET

Horst

Hangar


Dean of ET

Horst

Windpark

31

Dean of ET

Horst

Psychotherapeutisch Centrum

32

Director of the Facility department

Third party

Erve Holzik

40

Director of the Facility department

Third party

Cubicus

41

Dean of BMS

Cubicus

ITC

76

Dean of ITC

ITC

Faculty Club and Schuur

42, 43

Director of the Facility department

Own BHV staff1)

High Tech Factory

46

Third party

Third party

Vrijhof

47

Director of CES

Vrijhof (during the day)

BHV plan (in the evening)

Bastille

48

Student Union (SU)2)

Sports Centre (during the day)

Sports Centre (BHV plan in the evening)

Sports Centre (incl. sports fields)

49

Campus manager

Sports Centre

Logica

65

Director of the Facility department

Sports Centre

Amphitheatre

56

Campus manager

Vrijhof

Swimming pool

57

Campus manager

Sports Centre

Boerderij Bosch

62

Chair of UT-Kring

BHV staff, no team1)

Cabins

63

Director of the Facility department

Security Services department

Tennis park

64

Campus manager

Sports Centre

Pakkerij

-

Student Union2)

Pool of students

Euros

-

Student Union2)

Pool of students

UT premises

-

Director of the Facility department

Security Services (outside office hours , provided the assistance fits in with the ordinary Security Services tasks. During office hours, the nearest team is contacted.)

1) BHV staff, no team, HR provides for the BHV staff's training.

2) The HSE coördinator for CES also works for the Student Union buildings. However, the Student Union has the final responsibility for HSE matters in their buildings. Although the HSE coördinator consults with the CES director and the Student Union about the tasks to be done, the Student Union has final responsibility.

Several third parties have arranged their own BHV team for their buildings on the UT campus. 
The buildings concerned are Erve Holzik (40), Linde (61), Drienerburght (44), Sleutel (58), Vlinder (60), Mondriaan (59), Shopping Centre/Sky (51), Gallery and the Psychotherapeutic Centre (32).