Staff

Drs. L.B.M. Neven (Louis)

louis neven

PhD student
Ravelijn room RA 4262

Address

  • Louis Neven
  • MB-STePS
  • PO Box 217
  • 7500 AE Enschede

E-mail: L.B.M.Neven (at) utwente.nl

Telephone: (053) 489 4248

Fax: (053) 489 2159

Background & Education

I studied “Cultuur en Wetenschapstudies” (Arts and Culture) at the University of Maastricht and graduated in 2005 in the Technological Culture Tracé, which is closely related to Science and Technology Studies (STS). In 2008 I completed my training at the WTMC graduate school. In 2010, I was a visiting PhD student at the Centre for Science Studies at Lancaster University for several months. During this period I was supervised by dr. Maggie Mort, dr. Celia Roberts and prof. dr. Lucy Suchman.

Research

I’m a PhD student at the STePS group of the University of Twente. My thesis – supervised by prof. dr. Nelly Oudshoorn – focuses on the ways in which engineers, designers and other professionals involved in the design of Ambient Intelligence technologies devise representations of older users. I study how these images of the prospective older user emerge, how they influence the design of Ambient Intelligence technologies, how these technologies fit in the use practices of older people and how these technologies are perceived by older people.

My thesis will comprise four empirical chapters. The first of these chapters deals with the way the user is represented in visions of the future of AmI. The second chapter analyzes the user representations that emerged in laboratory tests with a human-interaction robot and older test users. The third chapter focuses on a pre-market pilot test of an AmI monitoring system for older people and analyses how the user was represented, how this affected the design of the system and how the older people responded to the system. Overall, the build-up of these three chapters is such that user representations are studied from the conception of Ambient Intelligence till the actual use practices in the homes of older people. The fourth empirical chapter subsequently reflects upon the way a particularly important issue – dealing with the diversity of older people – is addressed in the first three cases.

The goal of my thesis is to reflect on theories of representing users, to bring insights from social (critical) gerontology into STS (and vice versa) and to provide some tools or suggestions for designers to make their user representations more reflexive.

Teaching

  • 410410 – Introduction to Policy Analysis - first year, European Studies bachelor.
  • 162252 – Shaping Technology and Everyday Life – PSTS-master (Philosophy of Science, Technology and Society).
  • Co-supervision of students writing their master theses.

Publications

Book chapters

  • Neven, L. (2010) ‘But obviously not for me’: robots, laboratories and the defiant identity of elder test users, in: Joyce, K.; Loe, M. Technogenarians: Studying Health and Illness Through an Ageing, Science, and Technology Lens (Sociology of Health and Illness Monographs)
  • Neven, L. (2008) “Ambient Intelligence en Religie, van de sublieme voorzienige tot ambient religion,” in: van Well, M. (ed.) Deus Et Machina, De Verwevenheid van Technologie en Religie, STT 72, Stichting Toekomstbeeld der Techniek, Den Haag.
  • Steen, M., Neven, L., Meijknecht (2008) “Over het Geloof van een Ingenieur,” in: van Well, M. (ed.) Deus Et Machina, De Verwevenheid van Technologie en Religie, STT 72, Stichting Toekomstbeeld der Techniek, Den Haag.
  • Neven, L. (2004) “De Weerbarstige Toekomst van het Wonen.” In Van Well, M. (ed.) Beter Bouwen en Bewonen; een praktijkgerichte toekomstverkenning, STT 68, Stichting Toekomstbeeld der Techniek (STT/Beweton), Den Haag.

Articles

  • Neven, L. (2010) ‘But obviously not for me’: robots, laboratories and the defiant identity of elder test users, in: Sociology of Health & Illness Vol. 32, No. 2, 2010.

Networks

  • Graduate School of Science, Technology and Modern Culture (WTMC)
  • EASST
  • 4S