Submitted condolences 100-125

Messages 101-125

101. Ivan Turok (Acquaintance through the Regional Studies Association)

I have only just heard the terribly sad news about Paul. I knew him through the Regional Studies Association and enjoyed my conversations with him at conferences very much. In recent years, I wanted to start doing some work on university-industry collaboration and Paul's advice was tremendously helpful. He was a very friendly and generous person. Its such a shock.

102. Hans Vossensteyn (Previous colleague and director at CHEPS)

Dear Leanne, Theo, Martha and other relatives,

Through my former CHEPS and UT colleagues I received the terrible message that Paul passed away. Way too early, particularly leaving behind a still relatively young family who would need him as a guiding light in life as he was for his colleagues and academic peers.

I remember Paul as brilliant and super productive in many respects. As a director I tried to support him as much as possible. This was not always easy as the structures of organisations do not always offer all opportunities for creatives minds like he was. Though he helped us to push the limits in creative ways.
With Paul's death, science and education lost an inspiring colleague and teacher. His passion, enthusiasm and verbal skills created a very productive environment in which research, teaching and many persons around Paul could flourish. His strong research ideas sometimes also clashed with the views of others. Also this belongs to the academic debate, and a debater he was.  
I wish you all the strength needed to handle the emotions related to Paul's too early death. I also wish you to regularly hold on to the wonderful memories you have on Paul as an exceptionally gifted and caring person for those around him.

103. Mónica Edwards-Schachter (Colleague, co-author, and working together at the Social Innovation Futures project)

I'm still shocked by this news. I am fortunate to have met Paul Benneworth when he came to Valencia and have had invaluable discussions on subjects that he was passionate about. Together with other colleagues we embarked on a project to deepen our knowledge about the meaning and future of social innovation in the EU-spri network, we shared meetings, events and many discussions. I greatly appreciate his support and dedication in preparing a proposal Marie Curie (which I didn't get due to a small difference in score but was an opportunity to learn lots of things!). Whether in person or through Skype meetings or by email, I have always had the gift of hearing his outstanding ideas. But more than his academic mind and passion, I keep the memory of his goodness, his integrity, and his humanity. The times I spoke to him about my children and his passion for playing rugby and the love with which he spoke of his son and his family. There are no words that can ease the pain, but there is no doubt that his very special way of capturing the world and defending the values that we need to build and the imprint of his brilliant thought leaves a beautiful legacy that will remain with us forever.