IBA STAR Programme

HOLI STAR information 2016-2017

The HOLI module STAR variant HOLISTAR 2016-2017

Author: Fons Wijnhoven

Date: January 30, 2017

Learning objective

The HOLI module is designed to give students the opportunity to excel in the HRM, OB, Business Law, and Information Management disciplines in an initial stage. The module also challenges students to merge these insights with scientific methodological, business and reflective skills in solving a real business problem. Yet, some students may aim at more in-depth insights, which is offered to them by:

  1. More in-depth studies in the HOLI disciplines in next year study and electives.
  2. More in-depth analysis and solving of real business problems during bachelor and master thesis and internships.
  3. More in-depth reflection on what actually has been done and learned in the module project.

The third objective is offered here in the HOLISTAR track.

Students who participate in the HOLISTAR program are given reflective project methodological assignments related to the HOLI module project and will discuss their ideas in an action rules which will be used to update and improve the project manual and add the project manual with illustrative material from their HOLI project case.

Learning method

For each project step (problem definition, problem analysis, data collection, causes and consequences, alternatives generation, choice, action planning) the HOLISTAR members will evaluate what actually has been done and what business methodological learning lessons can be drawn by discussing per step what grounding assumptions and what method variant actually has been used.

Selection criteria:

  1. Belonging to the top 10% performers in TOP and BOM.
  2. Of not belonging to the top 10% students can apply by a motivation letter (max 400 words). This letter should minimally include the following:
    1. Motivation for studying HRM
    2. Motivation for studying Organizational Behavior.
    3. Motivation for studying Business Law.
    4. Motivation for studying Information Management.
    5. Motivation for reflection about project results and methods.
    6. Motivation for extra reflective assignments and possible additional reading.
    7. Excellent usage of English, great structure, and a professional layout.

We expect that a HOLISTAR may need no extra project time to perform this effort.

Based on both the letter of motivation and the study results in TOP and BOM, a selection is made of around 10-15 students that will be invited to join the HOLISTAR program. HOLISTAR participants will be member of HOLISTAR project teams in HOLI, probably composed of HOLISTARS alone. To be considered for the HOLISTAR program, students should have passed the exams of the TOP and BOM before March 1, 2017.

The selection process will be as follows:

Week # in HOLI

Activity

Before HOLI; Mid February

Announcement of HOLISTAR objectives and start of application submissions

17 February 2017 noon

Deadline application HOLI STAR

27 February

HOLISTAR selection finished and published

The HOLISTAR

Upon successful completion of these assignments the students will receive the HOLISTAR. The IBA diploma supplement will state that the student has successfully completed the HOLISTAR. For students participating in at least three out of five STAR versions of the IBA modules, a special rule for graduation with distinction is stated in the exam regulations.

After selection, there will be a first short HOLISTAR team meeting (around the start of HOLI). The other meetings are exactly the same as the regular HOLI project meetings, but as addition to the HOLI project assignments, the following extra questions (and possible background information) is given

Project step

When?

Extra literature: extra assignment

Session -0

around start of HOLI

Introduction

Session 1: Problem definition

Week 18

(Franco & Meadows, 2006): Deliver the problem ID. What additional problem ID issues have you found for your case? What are your experiential lessons for problem ID? Write your lessons down in the report. How did insights from Franco & Meadows contribute?

Session 2: Theoretical problem analysis & data collection scheme

Week 21

(Gregor, 2006): Deliver a reflection about theories that would be suitable for your case analysis. Write down your experiential lessons in your report.

Sessions 3 Empirical problem analysis method

Week 23

(Edmondson & Mcmanus, 2007): Deliver a reflection about research methodology & design that would be suitable for your case. Write down your experiential lessons in your report.

Session 4: Problem analysis results

Week 25

(Franco & Meadows, 2006): What lessons can be taken van Franco & Meadows regarding alternatives generation and choice? Write down your experiential lessons in your report.

Session 5: Solution and action plan

Week 26

(Lindblom, 1959): What lessons can be taken from Lindblom for improving your method of action planning? Write these lessons down in your experiential report.

Grading

Pass of HOLI is requirement for HOLI STAR

All the following activities have to be (completed) satisfactory to earn the HOLISTAR

  1. HOLISTAR’s input for discussions and active participation in discussions during the HOLISTAR meetings .
  2. HOLISTAR team evaluation of each project step in terms of new possible action rules related to content of literature (articles ).
  3. Individual HOLISTAR’s written experiential lessons from the HOLI team work as part of the project report.

References per step

  • Edmondson, A. C., & Mcmanus, S. E. (2007). Methodological fit in management field research. Academy of Management Review, 32(4), 1155–1179. http://doi.org/10.5465/AMR.2007.26586086
  • Franco, L. A., & Meadows, M. (2006). Exploring new directions for research in problem structuring methods: on the role of cognitive style. Journal of the Operational Research Society, 58(12), 1621–1629. http://doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.jors.2602346
  • Gregor, S. (2006). The nature of theory in information systems. MIS Quarterly, 30(3), 611–642.
  • Lindblom, C. E. (1959). The science of“ muddling through.” Public Administration Review, 19(2), 79–88.