Research area’s Jordy Gosselt

1.

Organisaties in de media (omgaan met de pers, selectiemechanismen in de media, effecten van berichtgeving op publiek/werknemers)

2.

Waarschuwingspictogrammen, classificatiesystemen (Kijkwijzer/Pegi)

3.

Nederlands medialandschap (bijvoorbeeld publieke/commerciële tv, radio)

4.

Jongeren en risicoproducten (beschikbaarheid en consumptie van bijvoorbeeld alcohol, tabak, schadelijke media, drugs, gokproducten)

5.

Politieke communicatie (argumentatie van politici, communicatiestrategieën, verkiezingscampagnes, politici en journalistiek)

6.

Onderzoeksmethoden (mysteryshopping, eyetracking, inhoudsanalyse, ….)

1.

Organisations in/and the media

The media play an important role in the constitution of how the public (but also the own employees) may perceive an organization (internal vs. external reputation). Due to all kinds of developments in the field of our information society it is increasingly difficult to deal with the media, but at the same time these developments make it essential to respond in a quick and effective way.

Several research areas may be an option here: for example an analysis of the (effects of) strategies used by organizations to gain media coverage or to respond in a crisis situation. More specific: strategies applied nowadays compared to earlier times, different types of organizations (public vs. corporate), different types of coverage (news frames), different channels (television, online, printed media), addressing the points of view of relevant actors responsible for the communication strategy, an (content-)analysis of (recent and/or major) news stories, (manipulating) framing of news stories, what types of stories are selected by the media and why, etcetera.

Specific research ideas:

1.

To what extent do people have knowledge of who are the producers of the news they consume?

2.

Effects of the five media frames (see Valkenburg et al, 2000) on the audience. Experiment: manipulate existing news messages based on these 5 frames. What are the differences in effect?

Theories and key concepts:

Media representations/coverage, framing, priming, agenda setting, medium theory, media richness theory, organizational identity and reputation, corporate communicative responses, social identity.

Methods:

Content analysis, case analysis, interviews/survey, experiments

References:

-Andrews, K.T., & Caren, N. (2010). Making the news: Movement organizations, media attention, and the public agenda. American Sociological Review, 75, 841-866.

-Kjaergaard, A., Morsing, M., & Ravasi, D. (2011). Mediating identity: A study of media influence on organizational identity construction in a celebrity firm. Journal of Management Studies, 48, 514-542.

-Huang, Y. (2006). Crisis situations, communication strategies, and media coverage. Communication Research, 33, 180-205.

-Liu, B.F., Horsley, S., & Levenshus, A.B. (2010). Government and corporate communication practices: Do the differences matter? Journal of Applied Communication Research, 38, 189-213.

2.

Media ratings / Warning labels

Media rating systems (also known as age classification systems, warning label systems, or restrictive ratings) can serve as an effective tool in restricting access and exposure to harmful media. Such systems, which at this time are used in at least 52 countries worldwide, are designed to inform parents about and protect children from violent or otherwise harmful media content. Age pictograms (also known as evaluative ratings) show whether a media product’s content is harmful for minors below a given age. Furthermore, in various systems, the actual content is specified with additional warning pictograms (descriptive ratings). Both the age classification labels and the warning labels can be placed on covers, packing materials, posters, and other advertising materials, and they can be shown at the start of a movie or television program. How are these pictograms used by the public and what are the effects?

Specific research ideas:

1.

Content analysis of classification systems / pictograms used worldwide: what labels are in use and what are the most important differences/similarities?

2.

Diary study into the media consumption patterns within Dutch families and the specific role of media ratings.

3.

An eye tracking study into the awareness of and attention to (Dutch and European) media ratings.

4.

Experiment(s) in which the prominence of media ratings is manipulated.

5.

Study into the clarity of media ratings: What do media ratings communicate and do parents and children understand this?

Theories and key concepts:

Forbidden fruit theory, commodity theory, reactance theory, sensation seeking, modeling, social learning theory.

Methods:

Content analysis, interviews/survey, experiments

References:

-Gosselt, J.F., De Jong, M.D.T., & Van Hoof, J.J. (2012). Effects of Media Ratings on Children and Adolescents: A Litmus Test of the Forbidden Fruit Effect. Journal of Communication, 61, 1161-1178.

-Jordy Gosselt, Joris van Hoof, Menno de Jong, Bärbel Dorbeck-Jung & Michaël Steehouder (2008). Horen, zien en verkrijgen? Een onderzoek naar het functioneren van Kijkwijzer en PEGI (Pan European Game Information) ter bescherming van jongeren tegen schadelijke mediabeelden. Universiteit Twente/WODC Onderzoek & Beleid. Den Haag: Boom Juridische uitgevers

3.

Changes in the (Dutch) television/radio landscape.

Because of considerable cutbacks of governmental support in the media industry the Dutch public television broadcasters are forced to think about far-reaching cooperation activities. As a consequence, the last symbols of the compartmentalization (verzuiling), namely the public networks like Avro, Vara and Kro, are about to disappear. Explorative conversations between several broadcasters take place. Who can/should merge/cooperate with whom and under what conditions? Another line of interest: What are the main resemblances and differences between public and commercial broadcasters (e.g., in composition of the audience, image/reputation, quality of the programmes, quality of programming, efficiency, NL/worldwide, etcetera)?

In conclusion: What are the major changes and challenges for the future with regard to the Dutch media broadcasters and how can/should both public and commercial broadcasters anticipate these changes?

Theories and key concepts:

Media representations/coverage, framing, priming, agenda setting, medium theory, media richness theory.

Methods:

Content analysis, case analysis, interviews/survey, experiments

4.

Off Limits: The effectiveness of age limits.

Many products meant for human consumption that are associated with addictive behaviours are also particularly dangerous for children and adolescents. The negative effects of drinking alcohol, smoking tobacco, using drugs, gambling, watching detrimental media and playing violent games for the general public are widely acknowledged. Risks may involve people’s mental or physical health and/or their social well-being. Risks may be especially valid for specific groups in society. Societies generally aim to protect children and adolescents from risk products. A possible line of research focuses on what organizations (that sell such products) can do and how they should deal with this matter. Also: what are the perspectives of adolescents and (their) parents?

Theories and key concepts:

Availability theory, theory of triadic influence, social availability, physical availability, economic availability, legal availability, age limits.

Methods:
Mysteryshop research, experimental research, content analysis, mystery calls and questionnaires.

References:

-Gosselt, J.F. (2011). Off Limits: The Effectiveness of Age Limits in Reducing Underage Sales. Enschede, the Netherlands: University of Twente.

-Gosselt, J.F., Van Hoof, J.J., Baas, N., & De Jong, M.D.T. (2011). Under 20? Show your ID! Effects of a national information campaign on compliance with age restrictions for alcohol sales. Journal of Adolescent Health, 49, 97-98.

5.

Political communication

Political communication is about the communication of politics. Research areas can be: argumentation style of nowadays politicians (for example by means of content analysis), communication strategies, analyzing election campaigns, and the area of politics and journalism.

Research idea:

1.

How do issue-specific media frames (regarding several different issues) affect the public?

Methods:

Content analysis, interviews/survey, experiments