Overview research projects

Members of the UAPD research group

The UAPD research group

(Back: Mascha van der Voort, Boris van Waterschoot, Jan Miedema, Arie Paul van den Beukel, Irene Anggreeni;

Front: Frederik Hoolhorst, Julia Garde, Mieke van der Bijl-Brouwer)

Currently, the UAPD research group incorporates 9 PhD research projects, all developing new use anticipating design methods, however focussing on different aspects, i.e.:

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integration of scenario based design with the use of virtual reality and gaming techniques. This approach enables future users to compose a product according to their needs and directly evaluate this design within expected use scenarios through simulation (see also Figure 1), thereby revealing their actual needs and wishes to the designer (Researcher: Martijn Tideman, MSc. Finished: Spring 2008);

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supporting designers in dealing with the dynamics of a use situation, i.e. the variety in characteristics and goals of users as well as variety in the circumstances under which a product is used, in order to design a product that addresses the needs and wishes of users in all situations (Researcher: Mieke Brouwer, MSc. Expected end date: end 2010, part-time);

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supporting the design process by providing tools to investigate the interactions between potential users and potential products by means of a synthetic environment, in particular the requirements for such a synthetic (partly virtual, partly real) environment and the way it should be incorporated in the design process in order to optimize the added value (Researcher: Jan Miedema, MSc. Expected end date: autumn 2009) (IOP-IPCR project ‘Synthetic Environments’);

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formalisation of the definition of scenarios in order to enable semi-automatic generation and selection of relevant scenarios by identifying the relevant components of a scenario in each of its application forms and the criteria used for scenario selection by designers in practice (Researcher: Irene Anggreeni, MSc. Expected end date: autumn 2010);

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reducing usability problems with electronic consumer products by developing and offering companies a coherent design methodology to anticipate expectations and needs of users on the one hand, and product influences on use practices on the other. The methodology of scenario-based design is expanded to incorporate knowledge regarding the interaction between product design, user characteristics, and user behaviour resulting from the research project “Design for Usability” (involving the three Dutch Universities of Technology) as a whole. (Researcher: Frederik Hoolhorst, MSc. Expected end date: summer 2011) (IOP-IPCR project ‘Design for Usability’);

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developing a driver-interface for transitions between automated and non-automated driving, optimized for user-acceptance and at the same time fulfilling requirements regarding safety and traffic performance. (Researcher: Arie Paul van den Beukel, MSc. Expected end date: end 2012, part-time);

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incorporating human factors as an integral part of the design process of advanced driver assistance systems. Traditionally, human factors is only incorporated in the analysis and evaluation phases. Aim is to support engineers to also include human factors during synthesis activities. (Researcher: Boris van Waterschoot, MSc. Expected end date: spring 2012);

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facilitating user participation in the design of medical appliances. Aim is to improve the usability and “experience” of complex medical appliances and treatment systems through active involvement of users in problem analysing, design evaluating as well as design generating activities. (Researcher: Julia Garde, MSc. Expected end date: end 2013, part-time);

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developing a surgical robotic manipulation system for the new generation of flexible instruments, that increases the opportunities of minimal invasive surgery. Specific attention will be paid to intuitive control by means of haptic feedback, visual information and working posture. (Researcher: Jeroen Ruiter, MSc., Expected end date: end 2012, part-time) (PIDON project ‘Teleflex’);

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resolving the paradox of user-centred design. Aim is to develop tools for flexible and rapid prototyping and methods employing these tools to collect user feedback at different stages of the product creation process. In particular the use of virtual reality to collect user feedback will be investigated. (Researcher: Jos Thalen, MSc., Expected end date: end 2013) (IOP-IPCR project REPAR).