CTIT University of Twente


Centre for Monitoring and Coaching (CMC)

Multidisciplinary Expertise Centre for Smart Technology in Health and Wellbeing

CMC website

Prof. dr. Hermie Hermens, Prof. dr. Dirk Heylen, Prof. dr. Ernst Bohlmeijer


The UT/CTIT research centre "Centre for Monitoring and Coaching" (CMC) aims to develop smart, innovative technological solutions for applied questions on health and wellbeing. For this, we combine multidisciplinary expertise from different fields, including telemedicine, human-media interaction and psychology.

Healthcare, especially the care for people with chronic conditions, has to change dramatically in the near future as the increasing demands in quality and quantity of care cannot be met with the present manpower and finances. The creation of sustainable healthcare for our citizens that at the same time supports a healthy independent aging, requires substantial innovations. There is a strong belief that technology will enable the necessary innovations, but only when this technology is co-created with the users: the targeted population, the health care professionals and the informal caregivers. This belief is clearly reflected in the European programs such as the present seventh framework program, but even much stronger in the upcoming Horizon2020 program, where ambitions such as active healthy aging are quantified in terms of two more healthy life years. Also in other European programs, like the Ambient Assisted Living program (AAL) and national programs, changes in healthcare towards a sustainable health and wellness care are clearly formulated.

The Centre for Monitoring and Coaching is a multidisciplinary CTIT/UT research centre, which aims to develop smart, innovative technological solutions for applied questions on health and well-being.

Research agenda and scientific goals

The centre's ambition is to create smart, innovative technological solutions that:

  • Supports people in their ambition of active healthy aging;
  • Decreases the load on intramural care by supporting self-management;
  • Enables elderly to live as long as possible in their own environment.

The focus is on researching and creating smart monitoring and coaching systems following the concept of 'High Tech Care with a Human Touch'. Our ambition is to become the national leader and a major European player in this domain within five years.

The main building blocks of systems that enable smart monitoring and coaching are sensing, processing and reasoning and human inter-action. Main scientific challenges that will be addressed are:

  • Ambulatory physiological sensing and environmental sensing using wireless sensor networks are input to such system and need to be combined with e-diaries, questionnaires and other subjective sensing (e.g. mood).
  • Training at home, including robotic devices, should be remotely monitored and controlled. Combined with context information, intelligent reasoning results in coaching advices to the patient and decision support to the health care professionals.
  • Smart self-learning algorithms and probabilistic behavioural models able to provide coaching advices, based on sensor and contextual information.
  • User interaction should be friendly, intuitively and persuasive, able to adapt to the environment and enable efficient personalized human computer interaction.
  • The system should support effectively changes in behaviour required in people with chronic conditions by involving the personal characteristics and integrating behavioural theories in the technology.


In order to realise our aims and ambition, building blocks have to be developed and interconnected by close collaboration of multi-disciplinary research groups. Staff and researchers of the CTIT groups BSS/Telemedicine (BSS), Human Media Interaction (HMI), and IGS group Psychology, Health & Technology (PHT), are the core of this Centre with essential expertise in the required areas to research and create successful telemonitoring and coaching applications. Key persons are the coordinators (prof. Hermens, prof. Heylen and prof. Bohlmeijer and researchers from their groups).

There is a strong cooperation with Roessingh Research and Development in many areas, where the PhD's have a PNUT position at the BSS group. In addition, there are strong and on-going cooperations with other UT groups such as EEMCS-BSS (sensing), EEMCS-SCS (requirements, infrastructure), EEMCS-PS (wireless sensor networks), and EEMCS-IS (software, architecture). In addition, there are project-based cooperations with research groups related to security and privacy (EEMCS-DIES), business modelling (BMS-IEBIS), impact on the society (BMS-STePS) and efficiency of the health care solutions (BMS-HTSR).

Core researchers




Prof. dr. Hermie Hermens (EEMCS-BSS)


Prof. dr. Dirk Heylen (EEMCS-HMI)

Human-Computer Interaction

Prof. dr. Ernst Bohlmeijer (BMS-PHT)

Mental Health Promotion

Organization committee

dr. ir. Harm op den Akker (EEMCS-BSS)

dr. ir. Randy Klaassen (EEMCS-HMI)

dr. ir. Monique Tabak (EEMCS-BSS)

dr. ir. Hester Trompetter (BMS-PHT)

Core researchers

Prof. dr. Miriam Vollenbroek-Hutten (EEMCS-BSS) (EEMCS-BSS)

dr. ir. Bert-Jan van Beijnum (EEMCS-BSS)

Prof. dr. Peter Veltink (EEMCS-BSS)

Prof. dr. ir. Paul Havinga (EEMCS-PS)

Prof. dr. Vanessa Evers (EEMCS-HMI)

dr. ir. Rieks op den Akker (EEMCS-HMI)

Prof. dr. Karlein Schreurs (BMS-PHT)

Prof. dr. Lisette van Gemert-Pijnen (BMS-PHT)

dr. ir. Marten van Sinderen (EEMCS-IS)