Miri, dr. H. (Hossein

Miri, dr. H. (Hossein)






Mo. / Tu. / Wed. / Thu. / Fr.



Cubicus, room B205



+31 (0)53 – 489 5555



+31 (0)53 – 489 5279



(room B217)



+31 (0)53 – 489 2895




Personal website







I am a Postdoctoral Research Scientist in Virtual Reality and Motion Capture at the University of Twente. Together with colleagues in HMI (Human Media Interaction technical laboratory) and PCRS (Psychology of Conflict, Risk and Safety research group) my current research project is concerned with developing a multi-modal virtual reality simulation environment for training good interpersonal sense-making in law-enforcement officers. We are building a unique tutoring platform and a realistic avatar interaction model, fusing together virtual reality, motion capture, and text/speech analysis, in order to model human reactions to cooperative and competitive behaviours, in conjunction with the presence and absence of nonverbal mimicry. We aim to use this immersive virtual environment to capture and manipulate verbal and non-verbal behaviours for experimental investigation of cooperation paradoxes in human interactions. The project is a collaboration between the University of Twente in Enschede, the Dutch National Police in the Netherlands, and the High Value Interrogation Group at the FBI in the USA.

I come from a multitude of background competencies, including Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, my Ph.D. work in Cognitive Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, and recently my keen interest in Virtual reality and its application in Health and Education. I started my Higher Education studies nearly 18 years ago in my home country, Iran, and ever since, I have lived, worked, studied, researched, and taught in Cyprus, England, Germany, Portugal, and Iceland; prior to my re-location to the Netherlands. As an educator, academic, and research scientist, I enjoy pursuing a variety of research topics, provided they are approached from a technical perspective, while taking into consideration psychological and social factors. I firmly hold that science is a process, not really a position or a belief system, therefore new facts come along all the time and so we have to be learning and researching and working continuously. I also enjoy moving around the globe, as I believe working and teaching and conducting research in multi-cultural groups allows us to gain valuable insights into human nature and learn more about people from other ethnic groups. This way of life broadens our understanding of human behaviour, and so far I have had the privilege of living it!