Deel B BMT gerelateerde informatie Master

5. Master BME

5.1 Time scope and work load of the programme

The master’s programme Biomedical Engineering (BME) is a full-time study of two years designated as M1 and M2. The language for the whole master’ s programme is English. The work load per year consists of 60 European Credit points (EC). One EC corresponds with 28 hours of study time for the average student, which corresponds to 1680 study hours for a full year.

The work load for most courses is 5 EC (140 hours for the average student), which include lectures, tutorials, work on projects, report, assignments, self study and the examination. Although the official language of the master’s programme is English, courses may be given in Dutch in case only Dutch students attend the course. This will always be consulted with the students that are present.

5.2 Schedule of the academic year

BME operates on a semester basis, in which an academic year of 40 weeks is divided into two semesters. Each semester is devided in two blocks called quarters. A quarter consists of eight weeks of classes and two examination weeks. Most courses cover one quarter, although some courses cover a whole semester.

5.3 Master’s tracks

There are two main master tracks in the BME master’s programme. Students can specialize themselves in:

o

Molecular, Cellular & Tissue Engineering (MCTE)

o

Human Function Technology (HFT)

Next to the main HFT track there are two extra differentiations: The sub tracks Care (HFT-Care) and Biomedical Physics (before: Clinical Physics) (HFT-ClPh).

5.3.1 Molecular, Cellular & Tissue Engineering (MCTE)

The aim of the MCTE track is to educate students in the fields of new materials and tissues that can be used in and around the human body. Applications of these materials are for example artificial organs, artificial blood vessels, artificial bone and cartilage and skin replacements. The emphasis of this track lies on understanding, diagnosing and manipulating the underlying molecular and cellular processes involved. Furthermore the possibility of gene modification under normal and pathological conditions are discussed. Also cell responses to artificial materials are researched with the goal to minimize undesirable effects.

This track enables specializations in all relevant related research questions like: “Which materials are suitable for controlled release of medicines?” and ‘’what matrices are suitable for the reconstruction of tissues and organs?”

The track comprises the following research areas:

o

Tissue Engineering (Artificial culture of tissue)

o

Biomaterials (Materials, suited for artificial organs or matrices)

o

Biophysical Engineering (Diagnostic techniques for molecular and cellular processes)

This track is based on research and development.

5.3.2 Human Function Technology (HFT)

The aim of the HFT track is to educate students research and develop tools and technology for the use in diagnostics, therapy and rehabilitation. The track primarily focuses on the analysis of failing functions of the human body and the design of medical aids for either support or rehabilitation purposes.In this track advanced techniques for treatment are being analysed, together with analytical and imaging techniques used in clinical diagnostics. Moreover, the track enables students to thoroughly investigate all sorts of related research questions like: “How can biomechatronics assist the recovery of body movement functions or be launched as technology for rehabilitation or for reduction of physical strain?”

This track contains the following research areas:

o

Biomechanical Engineering (body motion, muscle coordination, heart and lung functions, motion rehabilitation, tissue mechanics)

o

Biosignals & System Engineering (neural functions, neural rehabilitation)

o

Biomechatronics (combination of the two research areas above)

o

Biophysics (diagnostic techniques for the first two research areas above)

In the this track medicine and technology are brought together and are related to the patient. Besides studies on new medical aids and diagnostic equipment, the student may also focus on the design process of these two to improve the user functionality for patients and the clinical environment.

This master track has a sub track, called Health Care Technology. This track focuses on the development of advanced technology for people with chronic disorders. To assist them in their daily life by making use of innovative technology and making health care processes more efficient. The target group are people with (neurological) disorders where the performance of movements is directly or indirectly affected. Students are trained in the user centered design, development and application of technology. This is done to insure successfull use of the applications in a healthcare setting. The main research areas in this sub track comprise:

o

Methods for user centered design of products and services

o

Biomedical signals and systems;

o

Information and communication technology;

o

Organisation of health care;

Research and education activities within this track are done in cooperation with the regional care institutions for as much as possible.

Another sub track of HFT is called Biomedical Physics (before: Clinical Physics):

The sub track Biomedical Physics (HFT-ClPh) builds on the orientation “klinische fysica” in the bachelor phase. It prepares students that are interested in becoming a clinical (medical) physicists.

Clinical physicists are responsible for the proper functioning (e.g. standardization and calibration) of medical instrumentation and work in close cooperation with medical and paramedical professionals. Furthermore, they are responsible for the accuracy and safety of physical methods, applied in the hospital for diagnosis and therapy. The clinical physicist therefore, often has a strong position with respect to investments in medical equipment. Medical professionals and hospital management rely heavily upon their judgement. Specilisations can be divided into five areas of interest: general medical physics, radiation therapy, radiology, nuclear medicine and audiology.

These aspects of the scope of the clinical physicist are reflected in part by the selection of courses in this sub track. There is a specific list of recommended courses, which can be found in the curriculum part B, §5.7. This curriculum is based on the requirements set by the Nederlandse Vereniging voor Klinische Fysica (NVKF). A certificate called ‘Fysica in de kliniek’ is given to those students that have met the criteria. Together with the MSc BME this certificate allows the students to participate in the selection procedure for a so-called “Opleidingsplaats Klinische Fysica” (KLIFIO).

5.4 Entry requirements – Admission & Enrolment

5.4.1 General admission to BME

The BME master’s programme is the continuation programme of the Dutch bachelor’s programme ‘Biomedische Technologie’ (BMT). Students with the following background are, without further notice, admitted to the programme:

o

BMT Bachelor’s degree of the University of Twente or Eindhoven;

o

Life Science & Technology Bachelor’s degree at the University of Groningen with a specialisation in BMT

Students from other bachelor’s and master’s programmes (side-continuates) have to be specially submitted to the programme on admission request, see also next paragraphs.

Students with close prospects to the BMT Bachelor’s degree (or other relevant degree), may also be allowed to follow courses in the master’s programme. This is a favour of the UT for students that otherwise will not be able to follow a full-time curriculum. To use this option, students have to confer a year planning, which shows the necessity of following master’s courses, with the student counsellor. Starting a master’s internship or assignment is, however, not an option without a Bachelor’s degree.

5.4.2 Admission to BME of academic side-continuates

Students in possession of a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Applied Physics, Applied Mathematics, Physics or Chemistry from a Dutch university, will be allowed to enter the BME master’s programme. These students have to follow a special “homologation” track within the master’s programme to straighten knowledge with regular BME students.

The homologation programme is part of the master’s programme for Dutch side-continuates. A side-continuate will in general pick a master track close to the technological character of the students bachelor’s programme. This bachelor’s programme in general, lacks the broadness of biomedical engineering topics that are typical for the UT-BMT bachelor. We strongly believe in the multidisciplinary character of the biomedical engineering future. The homologation programme supplies knowledge of and an entrée to other important BME fields, knowledge that the labour market expects the BME Master graduate to possess. The size of the homologation programme is 15 EC. The homologation programme does not extend the size of the master. Technology bachelor graduates can find biological and healthcare organizational topics below. The Board of Examiners is responsible for the admission and fitting-in of side-continuates.

NOTE: please consult the student counsellor Theo van Dam before starting the BME master programme:

E: t.vandam@utwente.nl

T: 053-4893154

R: HR Z100

The courses are:

Homologation programme (15 EC)

Course

Course code

EC

Kwartiel

Docent

Anatomie en fysiologie v/h bewegen

B1, 270200

5

K1

Van Wessel

Bouw en werking van cellen

B1, 135006

5

K3

Kruijer

Zorgprocessen voor BMT

B1, 273011

2,5

K4

Oosterwijk

Zorg- en revalidatietechnologie

B2, 273055

2,5

K4

Hermens

WO Sidecontinuates

EC

HBO students

EC

No premaster

0

Premaster (non)-mathematical courses (refer to 5.4.3)

30

Homologation

15

Homologation

15

Compulsory

15

Compulsory

15

Biomedical Courses

10

Biomedical Courses

10

Biomedical Engineering Courses

15

Biomedical Engineering Courses

15

Elective Courses

5

Elective Courses

20

Sum Courses

60

Sum Courses

85

 

 

 

 

Internship

15

No Internship

0

MSc Assignment

45

MSc Assignment

45

Total Master Programme

120

Total Master Programme

120

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre-master + Master Programme

150

5.4.3 Admission to BME for students from Higher Professional Education (HBO students)

Skilful HBO graduates (grades above average) from a, for biomedical engineering point of view, relevant programme can be admitted to the BME master’s programme after successfully finalising a special pre-master’s programme. This programme helps eliminating any backlog of the candidate and focuses on academic in-depth. Potentially desired broadening of the BME courses will be dealt with in the special “homologation” programme within the master’s programme. (See part B §5.4.2)

For admission to the programme, HBO students are judged on their programme’s suitability: an exploratory interview will be taken and previous study results will be reviewed. When admitted to the official programme, a tailored pre-master’s programme is composed for the aimed master’s track and prior bachelor’s programme. Only students that need a pre-master’s programme of maximally 30 EC are admitted. The Board of Examiners is responsible for the specific curriculum of the tailored pre-master’s programme for HBO students.

Pre-master’s programme

The pre-master’s programme has a mathematical part of Calculus and Linear Algebra –with a total size of 15 EC – scheduled over the first semester. The courses are Calculus A, B and C (course codes 151200, 151202, 151204) and Linear Algebra A and B (course codes 151206, 151208). The other part of the pre-master depends on choices made during the bachelor study and interest in the research in the group where the master’s assignment will be carried out. Here are some examples.

For the research group Biomechanical Engineering the courses could be “Mechanica van het Bewegingsapparaat” (B3, K3, 115049, 2,5 EC, Homminga), “Fysische Transport Verschijnselen in Biologische Systemen” (B2, K3-4, 271311, 5 EC de Jongh) and “Mechanica van Technische en Biologische Materialen” (B3, K1, 115030, 5 EC Homminga).

For the research group Biomedical Signals and Systems the courses could be “Signalen en Systemen” (B2, K1, 156180, 5 EC Zwart), “Biomedische Systeem Analyse” (B2, K3, 121166, 5 EC Veltink) and “Bio-elektriciteit” (B3, K3, 121139, 3 EC Heida).

For the research group Biophysical Engineering the courses could be “Molecuulspectroscopie” (B3, K1, 136013, 5 EC Otto), “Medische Technologie” (B2, K1-2, 140201, 5 EC Manohar) and “Biomedische Sensoren” (B3, K2, 140205, 2.5 EC Kooyman).

For the research groups in Polymerchemistry and Biomaterials the courses could be “Polymeerchemie en Biomaterialen” (B3, K3, 271304, 5 EC Grijpma), “Bio-organische Chemie” (B3, K2, 132055, 3.5 EC Dijkstra) and “Molecuulspectroscopie” (B3, K1,136013, 5 EC Otto).

The courses of the non-mathematical part of the pre master’s progamme are scheduled according the BMT bachelor’s programme and will be held in the first and second semester. It is allowed to add some master courses to the planning to get a more or less full (= 60 EC) planning of the academic year. Preferably these extra courses are part of the homologation programme.

HBO continuates will have already performed an internship during their bachelor’s programme. The incorporated bachelor courses (15 EC) in the homologation programme will replace the master’s internship (see part B, §5.2). By doing this we preserve the full academic character of the master and broaden the complete BaMa trajectory of the individual student to best meet the demands of the research, and industry labour markets.

Please consult the student counsellor Theo van Dam before starting the BME master programme:

E: t.vandam@utwente.nl

T: 053-4893154

R: HR Z100

5.4.4 (Re-)Enrolment for the master’s programme

Formal registration for a master’s programme at the UT must be submitted to the CSA. S&OA-TNW-BME will inform CSA on whether enrolling students meet the requirements for the specific master’s programme, which is based on the decisions of the Admission Committee and/or the Board of Examiners.

When bachelor students apply for their bachelor’s exam, S&OA-TNW asks all bachelor students to specify in which master’s programme they want to continue. This is communicated to CSA by S&OA-TNW .

For each year at the university, students have to renew their enrolment. Its important that reenrolment is done before the start of the new academic year, CSA will contact you by email or regular mail with information on reenrolment. Enrolments are based on the provisions in the Higher Education and Research Act (WHW) and must be completed before the first of September. Only after all requirements are met, including payment of tuition fees, will the enrolment be completed.

On the (re-)enrolment forms of the UT, students can indicate whether they want to enrol for a second study. This is only useful when a degree or propaedeutics of this second study programme is desired. Extra courses at other programmes can also be taken by any master’s student. In that case, the (extra) study results will be registered to the student’s “first” study programme. CSA will communicate enrolments with the IBG

Please note that the various pre-master’s programmes concern different programmes for which separate enrolment is required! More information for admission and enrolment can be found at the following website:

http://www.utwente.nl/en/education/enrolment_procedures

5.5 Checklist (prior to) study start

Prior to start of the master’s programme, a number of steps have to be taken by the (future) master’s student. The list below can be regarded as the first directions. More extended information can also be found in this guide.

1. Admission and enrolment to the programme

The admission requirements to start a master’s programme are presented in part B, §5.4 of this guide. Enrolments are centrally organised at CSA. In part A, chapter 5 the terms and fees and finance for enrolment are presented.

2. Composition of a personalised master’s curriculum

The master’s programme of Biomedical Engineering at the UT is characterised by its specialisation and depth in a particular part of the BME research area. This allows the master’s student to compose a personalised master’s curriculum. To ensure quality of the programme, the composition of this curriculum has to consent with a number of programme rules, which will be explained in part B, §5.7. This requires a number of steps to be taken by a future student before/ at the start of the programme.

3. Choose a master’s track and research group

Prior to the start of a master’s programme, students have to sort out their interests and abilities in order to determine a fitting master’s track. Hereafter, a biomedical research group of the UT can be chosen to conduct the master’s assignment. Part B, §5.3 provides information about the different master tracks in the programme. In part B, §3.2 a description of the various BME-related research groups is given. In general, the chosen bachelor orientation will continue in the master track.

4. Plan a set of courses together with the professor of the chosen research group

The professor of the chosen research group can be consulted to plan a personalised set of courses for a master’s track. This set has to consist of three compulsory courses and a number of elective courses, which has to comply with some general rules and some specific demands of the professor of the chosen research group.

5. Select compulsory and elective courses

The schedules for the master’s programme consist of the compulsory courses and the courses that are primarily intended as elective courses for BME students. The information for other elective courses can be found at the schedules of the relevant study programmes for that course or can be acquired from the concerning lecturer.

6. Fill in a course list form

The determined set of courses has to be submitted in a course list form with the signatures of the student and the professor. Specific demands for graduation at a certain research group can be found in part B, §5.7. An up-to-date version of this information can be found at: http://www.tnw.utwente.nl/bme/education.

The forms can be found in appendix 4 and on the following website:

http://www.tnw.utwente.nl/onderwijs_onderzoek_en_organis/organisatie/SenO/onderwijszaken/formulieren/

7. Submit form to S&OA-TNW-BME and get consent of Board of Examiners (via S&OA-TNW-BME)

The course list form has to be submitted to S&OA-TNW-BME. The form will be reviewed by the Board of Examiners for its conformity to the programme’s demands. The content of the course profile is the responsibility of the student and professor of the chosen research group. S&OA-TNW-BME will send an e-mail to the student about admission approval or not.

Please note that this form needs to be submitted at S&OA-TNW-BME at least 1 month before start of the master programme courses.

8. Enrolment for courses

Enrolment for the individual master’s courses is required via Blackboard at least 6 weeks prior to start of the course (except for the courses that are given directly at programme start). In this way, a lecturer is able to adapt the course preparation to the expected number of students.

5.6 Internationalisation

The MSc education programme prepares a student for jobs and research positions in Biomedical Engineering. The BME learning and research environment is highly internationally oriented and the programme and its courses are in English. This enables easy access to our programme for foreign students. Our students may carry out part of the master’s programme at a university abroad. Currently the BME programme office is actively recruiting students from various European countries and from other continents. This will result in a more international composition of our master’s student population.

BME master’s students may study up to one semester at another selected university. With some universities BME has an exchange contract or has good contacts within the Biomedical Technology Institute research groups.

The master’s programme of BME offers several opportunities for adding an international dimension to the knowledge and the practical experience of a student. BME believes that a stay abroad is a valuable component of the study.

The guide “BME Internship/ Studying BME Abroad” presents information for the students of the BME master’s programme who want to study abroad, fulfill the internship or carry out a part of the master’s assignment abroad. The master’s assignment is still under the supervision of the professor of one of the BME research chairs of the UT and under the responsibilty of the Master’s Assignment Committee.

The possibility to do a part of the master’s programme abroad is currently in an experimental phase, so everything may not be as well organized as in the regular study programme. This is expected not to be a problem for entrepreneurial students who are seeking for foreign experiences.

More up to date and factual information will become available on the BME website. Be sure to make an appointment well in advance of your study plans with the internship coordinator (eng. Betty Folkers) and the internationalisation coordinator (eng. Rik Akse). There you can discuss all possibilities and procedures concerning studying abroad.

Contact information eng. Rik Akse:

Contact information eng. Betty Folkers:

E: h.a.akse@utwente.nl

E: stage@tnw.utwente.nl

T: 053-4892886

T: 053-4892772

R: HT 615

R: HT 705

5.7 Master’s course curriculum

This chapter helps you compose your master curriculum. In the first three paragraphs general information is given on the requirements. In paragraph 5.7.4 each research group gives a list of its recommended courses. The last two paragraphs give different overviews of the courses given in the BME programme. Detailed VIST information on the courses mentioned in this study guide can be found in Part B §5.10 of this study guide and on the website www.utwente.nl/vist.

5.7.1 Choosing the master’s course curriculum

To compose a suitable master’s curriculum by choosing a set of courses, the following topics are important:

o

What do you want? This will result in the specialisation of the master’s programme: track and research group. The tracks can be found in part B, §5.3, detailed information about the research groups can be found in part B, §3.2. This choice has to be made before the start of the programme, because it determines the main part of courses to be taken.

o

How do you want to plan your programme? The study programme is concluded with a master’s assignment. So especially planning the internship in the master’s programme is important because this is hard to shift.

The following checklist represents the formalities concerning planning of the curriculum:

Checklist planning master’s curriculum

Quarter

Planning

Application forms (appendix 4)

Bachelor’s phase

o

Orientation on tracks and master’s specialisations

o

Chose appropriate bachelor orientation

o

Attend B2 colloquia and master’s information meeting

 

Before start master’s programme

o

Choice of master’s track and research groups

o

Selection of courses

o

Planning of courses and internship

Application form for course list

(S&OA-TNW website)

1st quarter

o

Orientation on internships

o

Selection and planning of an early internship

Internship forms

(Student Mobility System, internship coordinator)

2nd quarter

Selection and planning of a late internship

 

4th quarter

Orientation master’s assignment

 

At least 1 month before start of master’s assignment

Selection and planning of master’s assignment

Application form for master’s assignment (S&OA-TNW website)

At least 1 month before graduation

Determination master’s assignment colloquium

Application form for master’s exam (S&OA-TNW website)

8th quarter

Graduation BME

 

5.7.2 Rules for the master’s curriculum

The total study load for the entire master’s curriculum must consist of minimally 120 EC’s. It has to contain the following items:

o

Three compulsory courses (listed in next paragraph) of 5 EC each (15 EC in total),

o

Courses (minimal 45 EC),

-

Minimally 15 EC of biomedical engineering courses (B-courses) in the chosen master’s track. Generally these courses concern the (highly) recommended courses by the chosen research group (listed in part B, § 5.7.4) that are often the main courses, provided by this group.

-

Minimally 10 EC biomedical courses (M-courses) in the chosen track;

-

A number of additional courses, recommended by the research group, often concerning supportive engineering courses (E-courses);or elective courses; or special courses (S-courses)

-

Courses that you choose freely; which may be provided by other master’s tracks or extracuricullar courses, see note part B §5.7.5;

o

An external internship (15 EC), see part B, §5.8.

o

A master’s assignment (a thesis project of 45 EC), see part B, §5.9

The master’s assignment is the last item in the programme to perform.

5.7.3 Compulsory courses

MCTE

o

Tissue engineering (364004, 5EC) van Blitterswijk / Habibovic / van Apeldoorn

o

Biophysical techniques & molecular imaging (364002, 5EC) Subramaniam / Otto

o

Biomedical materials engineering I (374002, 5EC) Dijkstra

HFT

o

Technology for the support of human functions (121131, 5EC) le Feber / Veltink

o

Integrative design of biomedical products (115070, 5EC) Verkerke / Hekman / Homminga

o

Non-invasive diagnostics (354204, 5EC) Steenbergen / Slump/ ten Haken

HFT-Clinal Physics

o

Technology for the support of human functions (121131, 5EC) le Feber / Veltink

o

Biophysical techniques & molecular imaging (364002, 5EC) Subramaniam / Otto

o

Non-invasive diagnostics (354204, 5EC) Steenbergen/Slump/ten Haken

See for additional information part B, §5.7.4

HFT-Care

o

Technology for the support of human functions (121131, 5EC) le Feber / Veltink

o

Integrative design of biomedical products (115070, 5EC) Verkerke / Hekman / Homminga

o

Home care technology (121147, 5EC) Hermens

5.7.4 Recommended master courses

The various research groups all have a list of courses that they recommend in case of a planned master’s assignment at their group. The research groups and their recommended courses are given below.

Please note that not all of these recommended courses are necessary due to different specialisation directions within the research group. Always make an appointment with the lecturer of the research group of your choice to discuss the different options.

Recommended courses in the Molecular Cellular & Tissue Engineering track

Biomedical Chemistry (BMC)                                       TNW

B 374001 Controlled drug and gene delivery (Engbersen)

B 374003 Biomedical Materials and Engineering II (Feijen)

M 135043 Advanced cell biology (de Boer / Kruijer)

M 135044 Practical course on cell biology (de Boer / Kruijer)

M 374200 C.S. Biomedical Chemistry (Engbersen)

Contact: Prof. dr. J.F.J. Engbersen

Biophysical engineering (BPE) TNW

B 350000 Biomedical optics (Steenbergen)

B 340011 Bionanotechnology (Bennink)

B 121112 Lab-on-a-chip (van den Berg)

B 364008 Biophysics (Claessens)

M 135043 Advanced cell biology (de Boer / Kruijer)

M 135044 Practical course on cell biology (de Boer / Kruijer)

E 136013 Molecular spectroscopy (Otto), if not obtained in bachelor

Contact: Dr.ir. J.S. Kanger

Medical Cell Biophysics (MCBPh) TNW

B 340011 Bionanotechnology (Bennink)

B 350000 Biomedical optics (Steenbergen)

B 364008 Biophysics (Claessens)

B 354204 Non-invasive diagnostics (Steenbergen / Slump / ten Haken)

B 373504 Biomedical membrane applications (Stamatialis)

M 364005 Clinical chemistry (Vermes / Doelman)

Contact: Prof.dr. W.M.M. Terstappen

Low temperature physics (LTP) TNW

See recommended courses for this group in the HFT track

Membrane Technology (MTG)                                                          TNW

B 373504 Biomedical membrane applications (Stamatialis)

B 373702 Biomaterials; Materials for hard tissue replacements (Winnubst)

B 374001 Controlled drug and gene delivery (Engbersen)

M 135043 Advanced cell biology (de Boer / Kruijer)

M 135044 Practical course on cell biology (de Boer / Kruijer)

E 373506 Colloids and interfaces (Lammertink)

E 373505 Membrane technology laboratory (Stamatialis)

From this list, courses should be chosen that relate to the contents of the desired Master’s assignment.

Contact: Dr. D. Stamatialis

Molecular Cell Biology                                                          TNW

B 350000 Biomedical optics (Steenbergen)

B 364008 Biophysics (Claessens)

M 135043 Advanced cell biology (de Boer / Kruijer)

M 135044 Practical course on cell biology (de Boer / Kruijer)

Contact: Prof.dr. W. Kruijer

Polymer Chemistry and Biomaterials (PBM) TNW

B 374001 Controlled drug and gene delivery (Engbersen)

B 374003 Biomedical materials engineering II (Feijen)

M 135043 Advanced cell biology (de Boer / Kruijer)

M 135044 Practical course on cell biology (de Boer / Kruijer)

E 374004 C.s.Organic chemistry of polymers (Feijen)

E 373506 Colloids and interfaces (Lammertink)

Contact: Dr. P.J. Dijkstra

Tissue Regeneration (TR) TNW

B 374001 Controlled drug and gene delivery (Engbersen)

B 374003 Biomedical Materials Engineering II (Feijen) OR

B 373702 Biomaterials for hard tissue replacements (Winnubst)

M 135043 Advanced cell biology (de Boer / Kruijer)

M 135044 Practical course on cell biology (de Boer / Kruijer)

Contact: J. van den Brink (Prof.dr. C.A. van Blitterswijk)

Recommended courses in the Human Function Technology track

Biomechanical Engineering (BW) CTW

B 115039      Biomechanics (Koopman / de Jongh)

B 115048      Human movement control (van der Kooij / van Asseldonk / Schouten)

B 121116      Biomechatronics (Veltink / Koopman)

M 115071      Clinical rehabilitation and technology (Rietman)

Contact: Prof.dr.ir. B. Koopman

Biomedical Signals and Systems (BSS)                                                     EWI

B 121116  Biomechatronics (Veltink / Koopman)

B 121072  Biomedical signal acquisition (Olthuis) 

B 115048 Human Movement Control (van der Kooij / van Asseldonk / Schouten) 

B 121113  Neurotechnology (Rutten)

M 115071      Clinical rehabilitation and technology (Rietman)

M 411122  Clinical efficacy and medical technology assessment (IJzerman)

E 121044  Control engineering (van Amerongen) OR

E 157109  Time series analysis (Zwart)

Contact: Prof.dr.ir. P.H. Veltink

Biophysical Engineering (BPE) TNW

B 340011 Bionanotechnology (Bennink)

B 350000 Biomedical optics (Steenbergen)

B 364008 Biophysics (Claessens)

B 364002 Biophysical teqniques & Molecular imaging (Otto/Subramaniam)

M 364006 Radiation expertise (Jonkergouw)

M 115474 Biophysical fluid dynamics: The Respiratory ystem (de Jongh)

E 136013 Molecular spectroscopy, if not obtained in bachelor (Otto)

E 155115 Numerical techniques for PDE (Bokhove)

Contact: Dr.ir. J.S. Kanger

Medical Cell Biophysics (MCBPh) TNW

B 340011 Bionanotechnology (Bennink)

B 350000 Biomedical optics (Steenbergen)

B 364008 Biophysics (Claessens)

B 364002 Biophysical teqniques & Molecular imaging (Otto/Subramaniam)

B 373504 Biomedical membrane applications (Stamatialis)

B 364004 Tissue engineering (van Blitterswijk / Habibovic / van Apeldoorn)

M 364005 Clinical chemistry (Vermes / Doelman)

Contact: Prof.dr. W.M.M. Terstappen

Engineering Fluid Dynamics (TS)                                                               CTW

B   115039 Biomechanics (de Jongh/ Koopman)

M   115474 Biophysical fluid dynamics: The Respiratory System (de Jongh)

E 358002 Experimental techniques in physics of fluids (Sun)

E   155115 Numerical techniques for PDE (Bokhove)

Contact: Prof.dr.ir. F.H.C. de Jongh

Low Temperature Physics (LTP) TNW

B 353005  Magnetic methods for (neuro)imaging (ten Haken)

B 350000  Biomedical optics (Steenbergen)

B 382003      Reconstruction and visualisation (Slump / van der Heijden)

E 155115      Numerical techniques for PDE (Bokhove)

Contact: Dr.ir B. ten Haken

Physics of fluids (POF) TNW

B 354207      Medical acoustics (Versluis / De Jong)

M 115474      Biophysical fluid dynamics: The Respiratory system (de Jongh)

E 358002      Experimental techniques in physics of fluids (Sun)

E 357001 Advanced fluid mechanics (van der Meer)

E 155115      Numerical techniques for PDE (Bokhove)

Contact: Dr. A.M. Versluis

Signals and Systems (SAS) EWI

B 121116 Biomechatronics (Veltink / Koopman)

B 121072 Biomedical signal acquisition (Olthuis)

B 382003 Reconstruction and visualisation (Slump / van der Heijden)

B 121090 Introduction to biometrics (Veldhuis)

E 121091 Image processing and computer vision (van der Heijden)

The biomedical courses according to the HFT track.

Contact: Prof.dr.ir. C.H. Slump

Sub track Health care technology

B 121116 Biomechatronics (Veltink / Koopman)

B 115048 Human movement control (van der Kooij / van Asseldonk / Schouten)

B 212040 Business process modelling in health care (Sikkel))

B 263100 Mobile e-health applications and services (van Beijnum)

B 236050 E-Health strategies (Spil)

B 411211 Health and health systems (Bridges)

M 115071 Clinical rehabilitation and technology (Rietman)

M 153133 Medical statistics & epidemiology (Albers)

M 364007 Clinical safety & quality assurance (Vaartjes)

M 411122 Clinical efficacy and medical technology assessment (IJzerman)

M 411216 Organizational aspects of applying Medical Technology (Hummel)

E 411118 Effective health care technology (Oudshoorn)

E 234010 Implementation of IT in organisations (Muntslag / Katsma)

Contact: Prof.dr.ir. H.J. Hermens

Sub track Biomedical physics (before: Clinical physics)

The sub track HFT-ClPh has a specific list of highly recommended and recommended courses, which can be found in the curriculum in the following subparagraph 5.7.6. This curriculum is based on the requirements set by the Nederlandse Vereniging voor Klinische Fysica (NVKF). A certicate called ‘Fysica in de kliniek’ is given to those students that have met the criteria. Together with the MSc BME this certificate allows the students to participate in the selection procedure for a so-called Opleidingsplaats Klinische Fysica (KLIFIO).

Note that not all courses presented in the curriculum are required. From each group a number of courses have to be selected. See also the recommended courses for Low Temperature Physics and Biophysical Engineering.

Please consult the student counsellor and the curriculum coordinator for further information about the requirements for this sub track and the cerficate.

NOTE: There is an ongoing discussion concerning the optimal preparation of BME students to become clinical physicists. Therefore, please check the BME website for updates regularly.

For more information about clinical physics please visit the website of the NVKF: http://www.nvkf.nl.

The highly recommended courses in addition to the compulsory courses mentioned above are:

B 350000 Biomedical optics (Steenbergen)

E 155115 Numerical techniques for PDE (Bokhove/Geurts)

E 358002 Experimental techniques in physics of fluids (Sun)

E 357201 Physics of bubbles (Versluis)

E 364013 Nuclear and solid state physics (Harkema)

E 150600 Mathematical methods (Krystul)

E 15…. Linear algebra (Geveling) if not obtained in bachelor

Contact: Prof.dr. A.G.J.M. van Leeuwen

5.7.5 List of categorised BME courses

In this paragraph all BME courses are arranged by course name, classified per category (M, B, E and S ), per track and per quarter in which they can be followed. On the BME website http://www.tnw.utwente.nl/bme/education the digital version of this list can be found. This list can be easily arranged to suit your criteria. The list below is arranged on course code, and the course names are linked to VIST.

NOTE: The division per track is not restricted: this means that it is also possible to choose courses from other tracks if they are more suitable to your curriculum. Contact the research group of your choice for more information.

NOTE: In case a student wants to take one or more courses outside the ‘regular’ curriculum (meaning all courses that are not presented in the list in this paragraph) as an eligible course, this will always need approval from the Board of Examiners. In most cases it is not allowed to incorporate this course in the 60 EC determined for BME-related courses. However, these courses can be presented as ‘extra-curriculair’ courses. Therefore, the grades for these courses will not be included in the final grade list but in a supplement to the grade list instead.

NOTE: When this study guide was printed, several courses are still under development, for instance Topics in Anatomy & Fysiology.

Category

Course code

Course name

Teaching Staff

EC

Quarter

MCTE

HFT

HFT Care

HFT Clin.Ph.

E

110214

Design Tools

Vaneker

5

4

 

x

 

 

E

112171

Composites

Warnet/Akkerman

5

2&3

 

x

 

 

E

112172

Design, Production and Materials

Akkerman / Warnet / de Rooij / Bor / Schipper

5

2&3

 

x

 

 

B

115039

Biomechanics

Koopman/de Jongh

5

2

 

x

 

 

B

115046

Biomechanical Engineering - Capita Selecta

Koopman

5

-

 

x

 

 

B

115048

Human Movement Control

van der Kooij / Asseldonk / Schouten

5

3

 

x

 

 

B

115070

Integrative Design of Biomedical Products

Hekman / Verkerke / Homminga

5

4?

 

c

c

x

M

115071

Clinical Rehabilitation and Technology

Rietman

5

-

 

x

x

 

M

115474

Biophysical fluid dynamics: the respiratory system

de Jongh

5

1

 

x

x

x

E

115650

Elastomeric Technology

Noordermeer / Dierkes

5

-

x

 

 

 

E

115651

Capita Selecta Elastomer Technology Engineering

Noordermeer / Dierkes

5

-

x

 

 

 

E

115711

Introduction to the Finite Element Method

Meinders

3.5

1

 

x

 

 

E

115771

Numerical Methods in Mechanical Engineering

van den Boogaard / Meinders / van der Weide

5

1

 

x

 

 

E

115773

Computational Structural Optimization

Geijselaers

5

4

 

x

 

 

E

115774

Advanced Dynamics

van der Hoogt / Wolbert / de Boer

5

1

 

x

 

 

E

121044

Control Engineering

van Amerongen / Stramigioli

5

3

 

x

 

 

B

121072

Biomedical Signal Acquisition

Olthuis

5

3

 

x

x

 

B

121090

Introduction to Biometrics

Veldhuis

5

1

 

x

 

 

E

121091

Image Processing & Computer Vision

van der Heijden

5

3

 

x

 

 

B

121112

Lab on a Chip

van den Berg / Carlen / Eijkel / le Gac

5

4

x

x

 

 

B

121113

Neurotechnology

Rutten

5

3

 

x

 

 

B

121116

Biomechatronics

Veltink / Koopman / Schouten / van der Kooi / Rietman

5

4

 

x

x

 

B

121131

Technology for the Support of Human Functions

le Feber / Veltink

5

1

 

c

c

c

B

121147

Home Care Technology

Hermens / Vollenbroek - Hutten

5

3?

 

x

c

 

M

135043

Advanced Cell Biology

de Boer / Kruijer

5

2

x

 

 

 

M

135044

Practical course on Cell Biology

de Boer

5

3

x

 

 

 

E

15….

Linear Algebra NOTE: If not obtained in bachelor

Geveling

5

3

 

 

 

x

E

150527

Mathematical Modelling II

Vink-Timmer

5

2

 

x

 

x

E

150600

Mathmatical Methods

Krystul

5

2

 

x

 

x

E

152025

Theory of Complex Functions

Bokhove / Jeurnink

5

4

 

x

 

x

E

153044

Regression and Analysis of Variance

Poortema

5

3

 

x

 

x

M

153133

Medical Statistics & Epidemiology

Albers

5

2

x

x

x

 

E

153135

Statistical Techniques

Poortema

5

1

 

 

x

 

E

153145

Linear Statistical Models

Poortema

5

4

 

 

x

 

E

155115

Numerical Techniques for PDE

Bokhove

5

2

 

x

 

x

E

155116

Applied Finite Element Methods for PDE's

Bokhove / van der Vegt

6

3&4

 

x

 

x

E

155120

Scientific Computing

Bochev

6

3&4

 

x

 

 

E

156056

Introduction to Mathmatical Systems Theory

Stoorvogel

5

4

 

x

 

 

E

156067

Robust Control

Meinsma

5

3

 

x

 

 

E

157109

Time Series Analysis

Zwart

5

1

 

x

 

 

E

180067

Management of Technology

Brandsma / Veldman / Hummel / Mes

5

1

 

 

x

 

E

211037

Graphics & Virtual Reality

Zwiers

5

2

 

x

x

 

B

212040

Business Process Modelling in Healthcare

Sikkel

5

2

 

 

x

 

E

234007

Computer Supported Co-operative Work

Sikkel

5

2

 

 

x

 

E

234010

Implementation of IT in Organizations

Muntslag / Katsma

5

3

 

 

x

 

B

236050

E-Health Strategies

Spil

5

4

 

 

x

 

E

262001

Mobile and Wireless Networking

Heijenk

5

3

 

 

x

 

B

263100

Mobile E-Health Services & Applications

Beijnum / Widya

5

3

 

x

x

 

E

264002

Business Process Engineering

Kroese (extern)

5

4

 

 

x

 

E

265215

Service-oriented Architecture with Web Services

van Sinderen / Ferreira-Pirez

5

3

 

 

x

 

B

340011

Bionanotechnology

Bennink

5

3

x

 

 

 

B

350000

Biomedical Optics

Steenbergen / Leeuwen / Manohar / Koopman

5

4

x

x

 

x

B

353005

Magnetic Methods for (Neuro) Imaging

ten Haken / Bennink

5

4

 

x

 

x

B

354204

Non-invasive Diagnostics

Steenbergen / Slump / ten Haken

5

3

x

c

 

c

B

354207

Medical Acoustics

Versluis / de Jong

5

4

 

x

 

x

E

357001

Advanced Fluid Mechanics

van der Meer

5

1

 

x

 

x

E

357201

Physics of Bubbles

Versluis

2.5

2

 

x

 

x

E

358002

Experimental Techniques in Physics of Fluids

Sun

5

3&4

 

x

 

x

B

364001

Selected topics BME

Various

5

-

x

x

x

x

B

364002

Biophysical Techniques & Molecular Imaging

Subramaniam / Otto

5

2

c

x

 

c

S

364003

Interaction Training Healthcare

Lansbergen

5

-

x

x

x

x

B

364004

Tissue Engineering

van den Brink / Blitterswijk / Apeldoorn / Habibovic

5

4

c

 

 

 

M

364005

Clinical Chemistry

Doelman / Vermes

5

4

x

 

 

 

M

364006

Radiation Expertise

Knoopers / Jonkergouw

5

3

x

x

 

x

M

364007

Clinical Safety and Quality Assurance

Vaartjes

5

3

x

x

x

x

B

364008

Biophysics

Claessens

5

1

x

x

 

x

E

364013

Nuclear and Solid State Physics

Harkema

5

1

 

x

 

x

S

364088

International studytour

Alers (Paradoks)

5

-

x

x

x

x

 

364099

Internship BME

Various; Folkers (coordinator)

15

-

c

c

c

c

 

365099

Master assignment BME

Various

45

-

c

c

c

c

E

373004

Polymers and Material Science Practice

Hempenius / Vancso

3

1

x

 

 

 

B

373504

Biomedical Membrane Applications

Stamatialis

5

2

x

 

 

 

E

373505

Membrane Technology Laboratory

Stamatialis

5

4

x

 

 

 

E

373506

Colloids & Interfaces

Lammertink

5

1

x

 

 

 

B

373702

Biomaterials for Hard Tissue Replacement

Winnubst

5

4

x

 

 

 

B

374001

Controlled Drug and Gene Delivery

Engbersen

5

2

x

 

 

 

B

374002

Biomedical Materials Engineering I

Dijkstra

5

1

c

 

 

 

B

374003

Biomedical Materials Engineering II

Feijen

5

3

x

 

 

 

E

374004

C.S. Organic Chemistry

Feijen

5

-

x

 

 

 

M

374200

C.S. Biomedical Chemistry

Engbersen

5

-

x

 

 

 

E

377006

Corrosion & Corrosion Resistance

Boukamp / Gadgil

5

3

x

 

 

 

B

382003

Reconstruction & Visualization

Slump/van der Heijden

5

2

 

x

 

 

E

411118

Effective Health Care Technologies

Oudshoorn / Dorkbeck-Jung

5

2

 

 

x

 

M

411122

Clinical efficacy and MTA

IJzerman

5

1

 

x

x

 

E

411150

Innovation & Technology Dynamics

Faems / Kuhlmann

5

3

 

 

x

 

B

411204

International Health Strategy & Hospital of the Future

van Harten / van Rossum

5

3

 

 

x

 

B

411211

Health and Health Systems

Bridges

5

2

 

 

x

 

M

411216

Organizational Aspects of Applying Medical Technology

Hummel

5

2

 

 

x

 

E

412004

Organising Innovation

Faems / Groen

5

2

 

 

x

 

5.7.6 Course curriculum

This paragraph gives different overviews of the courses for each master’s (sub) track. The courses are arranged in a table according to the quarter in which they are given. Furthermore, the category of the courses is represented and listed per quarter. The legend below shows the meaning of the different colors that are used in the tables.

Compulsory

C

Biomedical

M

Biomedical Engineering

B

Engineering

E

Special

S

The curriculum starts at the next page.

Track: Molecular, Cellular & Tissue Engineering - MCTE


Track: Human Function Technology - HFT (not scheduled + quarter 1 & 2)

Track: Human Function Technology - HFT (quarter 3 & 4)

Track: Human Function Technology – Health Care Technology

Track: Human Function Technology – Biomedical Physics (before: Clinical Physics)

5.8 Organisation of the internship

IMG_2903A

5.8.1 General information

The BME internship (course code 364099) is a compulsory part of both master tracks except for HBO-continuates: The internship covers minimally 10 weeks (15 EC) during which the student is posted at a biomedical company, institution of health care, research institute or university. The learning goal of the internship concerns experience to the future working field by performing a relevant assignment at an external organisation. During this assignment, gained knowledge and skills at the study programme can be applied in an actual working environment. Two supervisors are assigned:

o

A daily supervisor: of the organisation that provides the internship.

o

An UT-supervisor: member of the scientific staff of the programme.

Students are evaluated on terms of their daily work and scientific level of research, which shows from the internship thesis.

All internships are coordinated by the internship coordinator. Only when all obligations of the bachelor’s programme are fulfilled, students are allowed to start the internship. Orientation for internships has to start half a year prior to national internships and a year prior to international internships. This time is required for actual arrangement of the internship, accommodation and all formalities. Application for the internship has to be submitted to the new Student Mobility System accessible by MyCampus webapplications: http://mycampus.utwente.nl.

At Blackboard (http://blackboard.utwente.nl/), all relevant information and every required form for the internship are available under My organizations and name: Internships TNW

This Blackboard site comprises:

o

Practical information concerning general events for internships, like: aims of the internship, preparation, manuals, links and forms.

o

Many links to companies and all sorts of useful organisations concerning arrangements and finances of internships;

o

All internship assignments that the internship coordinator receives by companies and organisations, will be added to the site;

o

Summaries and reports of internships by BME students so far, mostly performed in foreign countries.

Possible places to do an internship in the Netherlands are: Medisch Spectrum Twente (MST) in Enschede, Carint in Hengelo, Ziekenhuis Groep Twente (ZGT) in Hengelo, Ambroise in Enschede, Philips Medical Systems in Best, ErasmusMC in Rotterdam, Medtronic in Heerlen and Magna Medics Diagnostics in Maastricht.

Possible places for an internship outside of the Netherlands are: Perimed in Sweden, University of Sydney in Australia, MediUniWien in Austria, University of Alberta in Canada, Ossür in Iceland, Orthopedics in Zürich and Guttmann Institute in Barcelona.

Make a timely appointment with the internship coordinator Betty Folkers to discuss all possibilities and procedures concerning internships! In the following paragraph a checklist of the whole procedure for the internship from beginning to end presented. This helps plan and organize your internship.

E: stage@tnw.utwente.nl

T: 053-4892772

R: HT 705

5.8.2 Checklist for procedures regarding the BME-internship

From one year to at least 3 months prior to start of the internship:

1.

Student announces start orientatiation by submitting “Aanmeldingssformulier”: https://webapps.utwente.nl/srs/nl/srsservlet

2.

Internship coordinator makes an appointment with the student;

3.

Student chooses one of the following options for finding an appropriate internship:

a.

Help from Internship coordinator;

b.

Internship through a lecturer/professor;

c.

Internship personally arranged by student.

4.

Internship coordinator and student agree on the actions to be taken and keep each other informed by means of e-mail;

5.

Student checks possibilities for grants and other information at the site of the International Office (http://intoffice.utwente.nl, in Dutch) and the UT Internship site (http://www.stage.utwente.nl, in Dutch).

Internship post is found:

1.

Student submits internship assignment formby submitting “Opdrachtformulier”

2.

UT-supervisor confirms suitability of internship and informs internship coordinator;

3.

Student fixes insurances;

4.

Student submits: forms for grants available at the site of the International Office (and if applicable, lets internship coordinator sign the form of the “Twente Mobility Fund” TMF-form);

5.

(Dutch) students may put their “OV-kaart” on hold and request a refund from the IBG (the internship coordinator sign has to sign a document);

6.

Student arranges possible housing and trip.

At internship post:

1.

Student announces presence by submitting “Meldingsformulier” as soon as possible and at the very latest two weeks after arrival:

https://webapps.utwente.nl/srs/nl/srsservlet

2.

Student in a foreign country submits an extra form “Important Information” (blackboard.utwente.nl), for the internship coordinator, daily supervisor and personal contact persons; and permanently caries this with him/her.

3.

Internship coordinator files all data and sends a copy to S&OA-TNW-BME

4.

Internship coordinator sends an e-mail with evaluation form to the daily supervisor and to the UT-supervisor.

After the internship:

1.

Student takes the following actions:

a. Finishing of internship thesis;

b. Submitting to UT-supervisor: internship thesis;

c. Submitting to the internship coordinator:

i. Internship thesis (paper and digital version);

ii. Daily “Supervisor Evaluation” form (provided by the daily supervisor);

iii. Student’s evaluation form;

d. Submitting to Blackboard: A short summary of the internship;

e. When applicable, submitting of report for TMF-grants.

2.

UT-Supervisor takes following actions:

a. Evaluation of thesis and sending of the tutor’s judgement form to internship coordinator.

3.

Internship coordinator takes following actions:

a. Arrangement overall evaluation of the internship in an concluding conversation with the student;

b. Filing of data and arrangements for completion of the internship (e-mail to provider of the internship);

c. Closing the internship file of the student.

NOTE: In this checklist, forms to submit are marked underlinded and persons to take action in italics.

5.9 The master’s assignment

The master’s assignment is the final part of both BMT master’s tracks. The master’s assignment (course code 365099) covers minimally 30 weeks (45 EC) during which the student performs individual scientific research under supervision of a member from the chosen research group. The assignment is completed with a master thesis.

5.9.1 Objectives

During the assignment, students have to individually perform a relatively complex and large research project, which meets certain scientific criteria. The objectives of the assignment concern:

o

Specialisation in a certain research area: recognition of problems and formulation of research problems;

o

Independent performance of biomedical-engineering research or biomedical-engineering design;

o

Oral and written report of a research project.

5.9.2 Requirements

The student has to show and develop a sufficient level of:

o

Scientific work, including showing considerations of the “how and why” of the research;

o

Creativity, including making links and using of know-how from former studies and literature;

o

Working speed and methodology;

o

Progress of personal research contribution;

o

Oral and written expression skills to clearly report on the executed work.

The assignment is concluded with a thesis including amongst others conclusions from the work and recommendations for further research.

For endterms of the master BME please check the BME-specific part of the OER at http://www.tnw.utwente.nl/bme/education/forms_reg/regulations/oer-bme (in Dutch).

5.9.3 Choice and start of the master’s assignment

Choice

Students are recommended to timely discuss with the professor possible assignments in the research group at which they want to graduate. This may be well before the actual planned start of the assignment. The professor has to be allied to a research group of the BME group. The research group and professor have to be chosen at the beginning of the study programme to confirm the curriculum to be followed.

Requirements

Before starting the assignment, a student has to meet the following requirements:

o

In possession of a Bachelor’s degree;

o

At least 65 EC of the master’s courses completed (including internship).

Supervisor(s)

Once the student and the professor have agreed on the assignment, supervisor(s) will be appointed by the responsible professor. This generally concerns:

o

A daily supervisor;

Often, this concerns a PhD student of the research group and, in case of an external assignment, a member of the concerning company/organisation.

o

A tutor of the regular scientific staff;

Whether a tutor is appointed is dependent of the organisational structure of the group. In many groups, such a tutor is the daily supervisor of the PhD student, who most of the time also coordinates general tasks, like the official description of the assignment and the composition of an Master Assignment Committee.

The professor, tutor and daily supervisor determine the content of the assignment, for which the professor is held ultimately responsible.

Master Assignment Committee

Before start of the assignment, the Master Assignment Committee has to be composed and subsequently approved by the Board of Examiners. The Master Assignment Committee evaluates the results and monitors the progress of the assignment. The Committee has to contain at least three members from the BME scientific staff:

o

The professor (chairman);

o

The daily supervisor;

o

A member of a different (preferably) BME research group;

o

A member of the respective organisation (fulfilling an advising role in the committee) in case of an external assignment.

Application form for master’s assignment

At least one month before start of the master’s assignment, an application form for the master’s assignment has to be submitted to S&OA-TNW-BME. This form can be found at the S&OA-TNW website:

http://www.tnw.utwente.nl/onderwijs_onderzoek_en_organis/organisatie/SenO/onderwijszaken/formulieren/ and in appendix 4. The form must include the title of the assignment, a short project description, a short time plan and signatures of the professor and student. In case not all master courses have been completed with consent of the professor, this has to be indicated on the application form accompanied by a grounded reason for a premature start of the assignment and a planned final date for each course. The application is required to ensure that a student has met all requirements before starting the master’s assignment. The application form has to be confirmed by the Board of Examiners. Without such confirmation, the student is not allowed to start.

Practical arrangements

Some practical arrangements have to be made before starting the master’s assignment, which differ per research group. In general, this concerns:

Action by the secretary of the research group:

o

Provision of safety rules and signing these rules by the student.

o

Registration of contact information (home address, phone number) to ensure contactibility.

o

Appending of e-mail address to mailing lists for colloquia and news letters.

Actions by the daily supervisor:

o

Appointing a working space and necessary facilities.

o

Introduction to the staff members.

o

Arrangements for keys and overtime approval (e.g. access to building outside office hours).

Actions by the system administrator:

o

Generating an account.

o

Including student name to the website of the research group.

5.9.4 Progress and coaching

Progress

o

Individual assignments require high levels of independency. In the first place, students are responsible for their own progress, planning and arrangements for coaching during the assignment.

o

In general, students are expected to perform the assignment at the working space of the research group (instead of working at home). In this way, a normal working rhythm can be generated which allows for scientific and social contacts and increases the coachability. Potential absence has to be announced.

o

Students should make a good time schedule to ensure that the assignment can be finished in the planned period. This schedule can be discussed with the daily supervisor to determine whether it is realistic and should be adapted when circumstances turn out to be different.

o

Tip: start as soon as possible with the thesis. Postponing writing, generally leads to delay.

o

Tip: for evaluation of written work (parts of thesis or other work): supply timely to the daily supervisor and add previous versions (with comments on previous work).

Coaching

o

Preferably, students should have a weekly discussion with their daily supervisor about progress, time schedule and scientific work: approach, theory, modelling, experiments, results, conclusions.

o

Plan timely all meetings of the Master Assignment Committee together with the daily supervisor and tutor. Minimally two official meetings are required. At these meetings, a research approach, progress (especially halfway) and results will be discussed. Dependent on the professor, the draft version of the thesis or the management summary can be point of discussion during these meetings. In that case work has to be provided timely.

Group presentations and social events

o

At some groups, it is also a rule to give short presentation(s) for people within the group during the execution of the assignment.

o

The organisation of all events is strongly dependent of the size and culture within the group.

IMG_2901A

5.9.5 Completion of assignment

Course of actions

The final part of the graduation process consists of possible revising the draft version of the thesis, processing latest corrections and preparations of the Master Assignment colloquium. Once the thesis is finished and all master’s courses are completed, the final colloquium can be planned with the Master Assignment Committee. Furthermore, at least one month prior to the colloquium (excluding holidays), an application form for the master’s exam has to be signed by the professor and student, submitted to S&OA-TNW-BME and approved by the Board of Examiners. This period is required to comply with the meeting frequency of the Board of Examiners and is required for S&OA-TNW-BME to prepare a diploma.

When every requirement for graduation has been met, S&OA-TNW-BME will announce the colloquium at VIST and the BME website. S&OA-TNW-BME will give her consent and provide a list of grades. Students should check this grade list on correctness and completeness. This list can be adapted, only until a week before the colloquium and only based upon formal written evidence from grade slips, formal official grade lists by S&OA-TNW-BME and official e-mails by tutors. Additionally an electronic version of the final master’s thesis has to be handed over to S&OA-TNW-BME and a printed version to the the BME secretariat, minimally one week before the colloquium. These master theses are required for the accreditation of the study programme.

Master’s thesis

The thesis has to be in written English and should contain a summary in English and Dutch (also required for foreign students).

Structure:

o

The standard lay-out of the cover for BME master’s theses can be found on the BME website.

o

The number of theses to be printed has to be conferred with the tutor of the Master Assignment Committee.

o

Reproduction of the report (copying and binding) has to be conferred with the secretary of the research group.

o

An electronic version has to be handed over to S&OA-TNW-BME and a printed version to the BME secretariat

Points for evaluation:

o

Contents and structure;

o

Design;

o

Language and style;

o

Discussion and conclusion of results plus recommendations for future research;

o

References, list of symbols, description of the experimental set up, etc.

Colloquium

During the final presentation, the texts on the sheets need to be in English to accomodate foreign group members and students. The language of the presentation is preferably English, but depends on the composition of the research group. The student can consult the professor on this matter. The oral presentation is in the first place meant for the scientific members of the research group (and possibly the research partners or clients) and in second place for other interested parties such as fellow students, family, etc. The speaking time should be approximately 30 minutes, the defence afterwards approximately 10 minutes.

Arrangements:

o

The student is responsible for planning the colloquium with all committee members on a time at which no other meetings of the research group are planned. The latter can be consulted with the secretary of the research group.

o

A location for the colloquium can be arranged after consent of S&OA-TNW-BME. All courses have to be completed, otherwise presentation of the diploma is not possible! Along with the formal application for the master’s exam, the arrangements for the colloquium can be made. On the application form, the estimated number of attending persons and preference for location have to be indicated.

o

The student is responsible for the presence of required presentation material (beamer, pointers, lights, etc.) at the arranged location for presentation. This should be checked well in advance. Consult the secretary of the group.

Points for evaluation:

o

Contents and structure;

o

Message, selection of presented work considering the attending parties;

o

Explanation of used methods and results (clearness);

o

Style of presentation and use of audio-visual matters;

o

Answering questions.

Overall evaluation

The student is evaluated on several aspects during the assignment:

Final result of the delivered work:

o

Quality and quantity;

o

Relevancy;

o

Complexity;

o

Accessibility and usefulness (important criteria for possible publication);

Execution of the assignment:

o

Insight of the assigned work;

o

Theoretical foundations and applied methodology;

o

Practical skills;

o

Originality and creativity;

o

Attitude, effort, tempo;

o

Cooperation with ‘client’ and co-workers;

Thesis (see master’s thesis);

Final presentation (see Colloquium).

Presentation of diploma

Directly after the colloquium, the Master Assignment Committee determines the final grade for the master’s assignment and presents the diploma with a temporary grade list at which the mark for the master’s assignment is still missing. After a few days, S&OA-TNW-BME sends the final grade list with the mark for the master’s assignment to the student’s home address. At BME, it is not allowed to present gifts to the Master Assignment committee after the colloquium. Optionally, the student may invite guests for a festive drink afterwards, which is up to the student and has to be arranged personally.

To preserve the quality of the study programme, the student is expected to cooperate in a final survey by filling in the Exit survey of the Quality Assurance Committee. This concerns questions about the chosen curriculum, internship and master’s assignment. Especially the connection of the different programme parts is of importance.

5.9.6 Sign out at CSA and IBG and stop grants

S&OA of the concerning faculty will inform CSA about the official graduation dates of their students. Subsequently, CSA will inform the IBG.

For students that graduate during the academic year (ending in August), it is important to sign out of the programme/university directly after graduation at CSA. This way, the student can apply for a refund for a part of the tuition fees from the official date of signing out. This can be arranged at CSA (blue desk, Bastille) from the end of the month in which graduation takes place and by means of an application form for tuition refunds. The application has to be submitted within a month after graduation.

NOTE: Students have to stop their allowance for study grants themselves!

For Dutch students this implies that they should personally take care of quitting studiefinanciering and turn in their OV-card.

5.9.7 Credit points during master’s assignment

At moment of starting the master’s assignment (official date on the application form), some kind of counter for study progress is started at S&OA. Like this, every month 4 virtual EC is subscribed to the student’s record with a maximum of 36 EC. This may be of interest for study grants. The full 45 EC are only accounted to the student’s total record at actual graduation.

5.9.8 Checklist for procedures regarding the master’s assignment

In this checklist: Forms to submit are marked bold, Persons to take action in italics.

At least 1 month prior to starting date of master’s assignment:

1.

Student acquires a master’s assignment by consulting the staff of the chosen research group.

2.

Student, professor, tutor and daily supervisor compose and agree on a project description.

3.

Student and professor sign an Application form for master’s assignment, to get consent for proposed assignment and confirmation to have met all requirements for starting the master’s assignment.

4.

Student submits application form to S&OA-TNW-BME, who will pass it on to the Board of Examiners.

Start of the assignment

1.

Student signs safety rules provided by the secretary of the research group.

2.

The secretary of the group registers the contact information of the student.

3.

The daily supervisor appoints a working space to the student, introduces the other staff members and plans the assignment.

4.

The system administrator generates a student account, appoints a computer to the student and adds the student’s name to the group’s website.

During the assignment

1.

Student and daily supervisor have (a weekly) consultation.

2.

Student and daily supervisor make interim colloquia plans.

3.

Student and Master Assignment Committee plan at least two interim meetings (in consultation with secretary).

During completion

1.

Student sets date and time for colloquium after consult with Master Assignment Committee and secretary of the research group.

2.

Student submits Application form for master’s exam and arrangements for colloquium to S&OA-TNW-BME at least one month before planned colloquium

3.

The colloquium is announced internally by the secretary of the group and externally by S&OA-TNW-BME by announcement at VIST.

4.

Student/S&OA-TNW-BME arranges room for colloquium and presence of required audio-visual materials.

5.

Student invites guests for colloquium and may plan a festivity drink.

6.

Student requests BMT thesis number at S&OA-TNW-BME and potentially an entry number at the secretary.

7.

Student (with help of secretary) takes care of reproduction and distribution of the thesis at least two weeks prior to the colloquium.

8.

Student hands over a printed version of the thesis to the secretary of the study programme.

9.

Student hands over an electronic version of the thesis (PDF format) to S&OA-TNW-BME.

10.

S&OA-TNW-BME sends admission with unsigned diploma, temporary grade list and empty grade slip to the daily supervisor and informs student.

11.

Student (with daily supervisor and system administrator of the group) clears desk, dismantles experimental set-up, restores books and backs up data.

After colloquium

1.

Student signs diploma.

2.

Daily supervisor turns filled-in grade slip to S&OA-TNW-BME.

3.

S&OA-TNW-BME sends final grade list to student’s home address.

4.

Student signs out of programme at CSA (and IBG).

5.

Student submits master’s exit survey to the programme coordinator.

5.10 Course descriptions (VIST)

This paragraph contains all course descriptions of the courses in the course list given in part B §5.7.7.

[ Only in the printed Study Guide. Use the link to VIST below to see the Course descriptions. ]

The VIST information for the courses are arranged on course code. These descriptions are also available on the VIST website: www.utwente.nl/vist/.

An overview of the format and the abbreviations used is given below

Course code

EC

Course name

Other participating programmes besides BME

(see below)

Quarter

Teaching staff

 

Course description

 

Examination

 

Teaching methods

 

Course material

 

Extra info

Possible extra information

 

EnCon:

PK nec:

PK rec:

PK for:

OA:

Stud:

CHrs:

Extra:

Conditions for enrolment

Necessary prior knowledge

Recommended prior knowledge for BME students

Prior knowledge for next courses

Obliged attendance

Number of students

Contact hours per week

Extra info

Possible participating study programmes:

AM MSc Applied Mathematics

APH MSc Applied Physics

BA MSc Business Administration

BME MSc Biomedical Engineering

CEM MSc Civil Engineering and Management

CHE MSc Chemical Engineering

CS MSc Computer Science

EL BSc Elektrotechniek

EE MSc Electrical Engineering

HMI MSc Human Media Interaction

HS (HM) MSc Health Sciences (Health Care Management)

IDE MSc Industrial Design Engineering

IEM MSc Industrial Engineering and Management

IO BSc Industrieel Ontwerpen

MBI MSc Business Information Technology

ME MSc Mechanical Engineering

MTE MSc Telematics

NAN MSc Nanotechnology

SET MSc Sustainable Energy Technology

ST BSc Scheikundige Technologie

TM MSc Technical Medicine

TN BSc Technische Natuurkunde

TW BSc Toegepaste Wiskunde

WB BSc Werktuigbouwkunde