CHAP 8 ORGANISATION OF THE BME PROGRAM OFFICE

From left to right: Marion Meenink, Monique Davids, Theo van Dam,

Diny Broenink, Betty Folkers en Jan van Alsté

PROGRAM DIRECTOR

Within the faculty each study program has its own organisation with a program director in charge. At BME, this is dr.ir. Jan A. van Alsté. He has the final responsibility for the educational quality of study programs. This concerns the overall policies, regulations and performance in the program, but also the daily management. The program director forms the board of the study program and plays an important role in the development of new courses and in monitoring and improving of the existing tracks and courses.

E-mail: j.a.vanalste@utwente.nl

Tel: +31 53-489 4689/ 5826 (mobile phone)

Room: Horstring Z-108

PROGRAM COORDINATOR

The program coordinator supports the program director and is in charge of the organisational, procedural and content-related co-ordination of the study program. At BME, this is dr.ir. Ben H.L. Betlem. He coordinates the combination of courses and the quality assurance of the educational program. Together with the OKC, he evaluates the courses and initiates necessary changes.

E-mail: b.h.l.betlem@utwente.nl

Tel: +31 53-489 3043

Room: Horstring Z-104

STUDY ADVISER

The study adviser can support students during (study) problems that they might encounter. At BME, this is ir. Theo van Dam. Besides discussion of program-related problems, students can talk to him about experiences with studying, planning, complaints, educational and examination regulations, legal position and possible other suggestions concerning the personal program. The study adviser is the person of trust for students. The study advisor of BME also advises potential students for the BME program.

E-mail: t.vandam@utwente.nl

Tel: +31 53-489 3154

Room: Horstring Z-100

INTERNSHIP COORDINATOR

The Master’s program includes an external internship during which the student is located at a biomedical company, institution of health care, research institute or university. International internships are optional. Arrangements for internships have to be made with the internship coordinator, which at BME is ing. Betty Folkers. The regulations regarding internships are discussed in chapter 13.

Students can also consult the coordinator about following courses abroad. The internship coordinator has information available about:

o

Associated foreign universities;

o

Existing international (exchange) programs like the Socrates/Erasmus exchange programs of the European Union;

o

Support for encountering foreign courses in your Master’s curriculum;

o

Organisation of staying abroad;

o

Admission of EC’s and grades that are acquired abroad.

E-mail: betty.folkers@utwente.nl

Tel: +31 53-489 2772

Room: Horstring Z-102

SECRETARY

The secretary provides the first contact to the educational staff. At BME, this is Monique Davids. She is available from Monday to Thursday from 8.30h to 17.00h. Until 16 October 2007, Marion Meenink is replacing her. Her office hours are every morning form 08.30 to 12.30.

E-mail: m.davids@utwente.nl

Tel: +31 53-489 3150

Room: Horstring Z-106

EDUCATIONAL AFFAIRS OFFICE (BOOZ-TNW)

For all affairs regarding the direct organisation within the study program, like indistinctions in schedules, your grades registration or course admissions, the office of educational affairs is opened from 10.00h to 13.00h. At the office of BOOZ of the faculty TNW, Riëtte Nuijts-Kruse and Pinar Iz are the staff members who support the BME study program. To make things easier, most of the (information) forms that might be required are available on the internet (http://www.tnw.utwente.nl/organisatie/boz, in Dutch).

E-mail: r.d.nuijts-kruse@utwente.nl

p.iz@utwente.nl

BOOZ-BMT@utwente.nl

Tel: +31 53-489 1118

Room: Horstring W 221

SCIENTIFIC STAFF

The education within the study program is the responsibility of the scientific staff, which includes primarily professors, academic lecturers, research members, educational members and PhD students (AIO’s). Besides providing lectures, most lecturers also contribute in research projects. At the UT, the main biomedical research projects (and therefore also the scientific staff), are brought together in a special research institute, called the Institute for Biomedical Technological (BMTI), which will be discussed in the next paragraph. A list of all tutors, lecturers and professors is included in appendix 4.

INSTITUTE FOR BIOMEDICAL TECHNOLOGY (BMTI)

BMTI is an interdepartmental institute of the UT, focussing on research and education in biomedical engineering. It is recognised world-wide as a leading institute in this multi-disciplinary field of science where engineering concepts and methods are employed to solve and understand medical and biological problems. Research at the institute focuses on the basic biomedical disciplines as well as on fields of actual clinical utilisation. So, research at the institute concerns for instance biomedical mechanical engineering, biomedical signals and systems, polymer science and biomaterials or biophysical techniques in general or diagnostic systems for hospitals, tailored aids for rehabilitating patients or tissue recovery for patients with (partial) loss of body functions in specific. Covering all research disciplines, 125 co-workers are associated to BMTI. Most final assignments in the bachelor and Master’s program also concern current research at BMTI.

Scientific director and chairman: Prof.dr. J. Feijen

Managing director: Dr. W. Pontenagel

Secretary: mw. M.A.G. Wiehink

E-mail: info@bmti.utwente.nl,

Tel.: +31 53-489 3367

Room: Zuidhorst 116

STUDENT ASSOCIATION PARADOKS

Paradoks has started as student association of the study programs of Biomedical Engineering and also embraces Technical Medicine. This relatively new association has already 600 members and looks after the interests of all students at these programs. The board of Paradoks supports students in many ways with help of 25 committees:

o

Active contribution to educational policies and active handling on complaints regarding the study program;

o

Extra services of study support, like maintaining (digital) databanks with old exams and summaries and providing study books for profitable prices;

o

Study-related activities, like excursions, special lectures, symposia and (international) study trips;

o

Informal activities, like a two-weekly get-together, feasts and a gala;

o

Distribution of information by the student association magazine “Parallaks” and yearbook.

All students and staff at the UT can become member of Paradoks for € 8.50 per year and in case of a membership to another student association for a reduced rate of € 4.25 per year. For questions, students are welcome to visit the Paradoks room or contact Paradoks otherwise.

Site (Dutch): http://www.paradoks.utwente.nl

E-mail: info@paradoks.utwente.nl

Tel.: +31 53-489 2491

Room: Horst C004

COMMUNICATION OFFICE OF THE FACULTY

The general information supply to potential bachelor and master students of the faculty is performed by the communication office. They are supported by teams of students.
Head: Drs. H. ter Huurne

BME representative: E. Adlouni

Secretary: E. Diepenveen

Tel.: +31 53 -489 3176

Room: Hogekamp B 2126

RESEARCH GROUPS

This chapter describes the research groups, their interest and major research themes. All research groups participate in the Institute for Biomedical Technology (BMTI), except for the BIOS group that is only liated to the research institute MESA+. This chapter sequentially discusses the following research group. At each group faculty and relating Master’s track is indicated:

1.

Biochip group (TNW, HFT)

2.

Biocompatibility (TNW, MCTE)

3.

Biomechanical engineering (CTW, HFT)

4.

Biomedical chemistry (TNW, MCTE)

5.

Biomedical signals and systems (EWI, HFT)

6.

Biophysical engineering (TNW, MCTE & HFT)

7.

BIOS, Lab-on-a-chip group (EWI, HFT)

8.

Engineering fluids dynamics (CTW, HFT)

9.

Health Care Technology (EWI, HFT)

10.

Low temperature physics (TNW, MCTE & HFT)

11.

Membrane Technology (TNW, MCTE)

12.

Molecular cell biology (TNW, MCTE)

13.

Physics of fluids (TNW, HFT)

14.

Polymer chemistry and Biomaterials (TNW, MCTE)

15.

Signals and Systems (EWI, HFT)

8.1.1 BIOCHIP GROUP (TNW, HFT)

Dr.ir. Schasfoort

The mission of the Biochip group is to develop micro fluidic tools for rapid parallel analysis of thousands of compounds in proteomics and related applications. The group is strongly linked to the Clean-Room facilities of MESA+ to enable advanced fabrication tools for the devices. In our projects, advanced micro fluidic chips in combination with biosensor technologies are under development to allow separation of a complex sample and detection of a large number of biomolecular interactions simultaneously and in real-time in biological and food matrices and in water. The group is linked to the Strategic Research Orientation Bio Multi Analyte Devices (BioMAD) of MESA+. The Biochip Group is core member of the new Biomolecular Interaction Centre of the BMT Institute in the ZuidHorst of the University of Twente. Current Projects are:

o

"Proteomics on a chip" for monitoring autoimmune diseases (STW-IOP-genomics)

o

Bio-multianalyte devices (BioMAD, Strategic Research)

o

Multi-analyte food screening with micro fluidic biochips (SCREENCHIP STW)

o

Super sensitive detection in combination with nanoparticle SPR (MicroNED)

o

Microbial screening of water using micro fluidics devices (UT & WETSUS)

o

The group is organisationally embedded in the Biophysical Engineering (BPE) group of TNW.

Site: http://www.mesaplus.utwente.nl/biochip

Contact: Dr.ir. R.B.M. Schasfoort

8.11.2

BIOCOMPATIBILITY (TNW, MCTE)

Prof.dr. C.A. van Blitterswijk

The research in the group’s lab aims at developing regenerative therapies for patients with bone and cartilage defects. Typical research projects combine state-of-the-art biomaterials science with in-depth knowledge about stem cell biology to manipulate the process of skeletal regeneration.

Applied technologies include:

Cell biology

o

Bioreactor technology

o

Mesenchymal and embryonic stem cell biology

o

Molecular biology (recombinant DNA technology, qPCR, transgenesis)

o

Histology

o

Non-invasive imaging of tissue growth and differentiation in animal models

Biomaterials science

o

Rapid prototyping of biomaterials

o

Calcium phosphate ceramics and coatings

o

Polymeric scaffolds

Site: under construction

Contact: Prof.dr. Clemens van Blitterswijk/ Dr. Jan de Boer

8.11.3

BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING (CTW, HFT)

Dr.ir. Koopman, H.F.J.M. (CTW)Dr. B. Koopman (BW)

The research of the Biomechanical Engineering group is directed at the mechanical engineering aspects related to the treatment of impairments of the musculo-skeletal system. This includes biomechanical analysis and modelling as well as the design and development of constructions to replace, support or correct the skeletal system. From a medical point of view, the research topics are related to the areas orthopaedics and rehabilitation.

Biomechatronics

The basic research question is to gain insight in the coordination and control of human movement. The results are applied in the development of mobility aids with improved controllability, stability and energy requirements. Topics in this area range from basic to application research:

o

Analysis and Modelling of Gait disorders
The development of an interactive tool which allows clinicians to learn from if-then scenarios with respect to treatment methods of gait disorders

o

Dynasit
The development of an interactive tool which allows clinicians to learn from if-then scenarios with respect to treatment methods of gait disorders

o

Lopes
Development of a Lower extremity Powered ExoSkeleton (LOPES) to enhance gait training in post stroke patients

Orthopaedic implants

Various systems are developed for scoliosis correction, such as a force controlled orthosis for scoliosis redress and implants based on the properties of memory metal. Current research is on the development of a patient-friendly system for the evaluation and monitoring of scoliosis progression. Recent developments include the intramedullary leg-lengthening device where, in contrast to current devices, no connections through the skin of the patient are needed.

Site: http://www.bw.ctw.utwente.nl

Contact: Dr.ir. B. Koopman

8.11.4

BIOMEDICAL CHEMISTRY (TNW, MCTE)

Johan EngbersenProf.dr. J.F.J. Engbersen

The main research program of this research group is:

Targeting drug and gene delivery systems

Targeted delivery of pharmaceuticals to an intended site of action in the body is one of the most important issues for the next generation of therapeutics. Polymeric nanoparticles with surface-attached functionalities directed towards certain receptors/cell types can function as carriers for targeted drug or gene delivery. In gene therapy, DNA or RNA is delivered to the cell, inducing or suppressing a specific genetic function. In our research tailor-made biodegradable and non-toxic polymers with desirable functional groups and properties are developed for innovative drug and gene delivery systems.

Organisatorically, this group is embedded in the Polymer chemistry and biomaterials group.

Site: http://pbm.tnw.utwente.nl

Contact: Prof.dr. J.F.J. Engbersen

8.11.5

BIOMEDICAL SIGNALS & SYSTEMS (EWI/EEMCS, HFT)

Prof.dr.ir. P.H. Veltink

The expertise of the BSS group is Neural Engineering, covering the information exchange with the central nervous system for support and modulation of sensory and motor functions. Information is typically exchanged in the electrophysiological domain, activating the neural system by electrical stimulation and obtaining information by electrophysiological sensing.

The research themes of BSS are:

o

Neurotechnology and Cellular Engineering:

Signal exchange on the level of single cells in a cultured neural network. The research involves new interface technologies and learning in neural networks. In addition, Brain-Computer-Interfaces are investigated (Prof. Wim Rutten, Prof. Enrico Marani).

o

Electrical stimulation of the nervous system:

Spinal cord stimulation and cortex stimulation for suppression of intractable pain, Deep Brain Stimulation for motor control in Parkinson, vagal nerve stimulation and sensing for suppression of Epilepsy and modulation of the cardiac system (Dr. Jan Holsheimer, Dr.ir. Ciska Heida, Dr. Jan Geelen, Prof. Peter Veltink, Dr. Rik Buschman).

o

Rehabilitation Engineering and Biomechatronics:

Technology for support of motor control (for example by Functional Electrical Stimulation), on-body sensing of body movements, forces and muscle activation and electrophysiological diagnostic methods in Rehabilitation (Prof. Peter Veltink, Prof. Hermie Hermens, Prof. Maarten IJzerman, Prof. Hans Rietman)

o

Central Mechanisms underlying Chronic Pain:

Modelling of the processing of pain signals by the Central Nervous System and evoked response measurement methods for validation and diagnosis, involving peripheral painful electrical stimuli and cortical response measurements using EEG (Dr.ir. Jan Buitenweg).

BSS collaborates with the Roessingh rehabilitation centre and the research department Roessingh Research and Development (RRD), general hospital Medical Spectrum Twente, Twente Institute for Neuromodulation (TWIN) and several other national and international clinical academic groups in the area of Neuromodulation / Neurostimulation. Industrial partners include Philips, Advanced Bionics, Medtronic, Xsens and Demcon.

Site: http://bss.ewi.utwente.nl

Contact: Dr.ir. Jan R. Buitenweg

8.11.6

BIOPHYSICAL ENGINEERING (TNW, MCTE & HFT)

Prof.dr. V. Subramaniam

The Biophysical Engineering (BPE) group is a multidisciplinary research group operating at the interfaces of physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The research activities draw upon the expertise in the interaction of light with biological matter to probe the complexities of functional biological systems. The range of investigations spans the elucidation of structure-function relationships at the single molecule level, advanced imaging of complex molecular organisation, quantitative biology at the cellular level, and analytical and diagnostic imaging of functional tissue. The BPE group has research activities in the following BMTI research programs:

Biomolecular physics

Subjects of study are:

o

Protein misfolding and amyloid formation, with emphasis on neurodegenerative disease

We have active national and international collaborations in this area, including those with clinical specialists

o

Photophysics and cell-biological applications of fluorescent proteins,

o

Biophysics of Protein-nucleic acid interactions.

Optical technology for genomics-, proteomics- and cellomics research

Research subjects are:

o

Optical technology for genomics-, proteomics- and cellomics research,

o

Advanced microscopy – fluorescence (widefield and confocal), Raman, nonlinear, lifetime, total internal reflection

o

Ensemble and Single Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

o

Scanning Probe Microscopy

o

Optical and Magnetic Force Micro spectroscopy

o

Surface Plasmon Imaging instrumentation

o

Flow cytometry methods for characterization of blood cells

Bionanotechnology

Research subjects are:

o

High resolution imaging of protein complexes,

o

Force spectroscopy of chromatin,

o

Nucleotide excision repair of chromatin,

o

Organization of photosynthetic membranes,

o

Developing biomimetic drug delivery vehicles,

o

Optical immunosensors

Non-invasive functional monitoring and imaging of living tissue

This part of the Biophysical Engineering group focuses on the interaction of light with tissue for non-invasive tissue diagnostics. The aim is to develop new diagnostic tools which are non-invasive or minimally invasive. Technique applications that are being investigated include: Photo acoustics tissue imaging, Laser doppler blood flow instrumentation, Low coherence interferometry, Acousto optic imaging of blood vessels, Photo acoustic for mammography and tumour detection. A selection of these projects is:

o

Non-invasive Molecular Tumour Imaging and Killing (NIMTIK)

o

Imaging of blood vessels

o

Photo acoustic Small Animal Imaging

o

Contrast enhancement based on endogenous and exogenous chromophores and contrast agents

Site: http://bpe.tnw.utwente.nl

Contact: HFT-track: Dr.ir. J.S. Kanger

MCTE track: Dr. C. Otto

Clinical Physics: Prof.dr. A.G.J.M. van Leeuwen

Information about the chair: Prof.dr. V. Subramaniam

8.11.7

BIOS, LAB-ON-A-CHIP GROUP (EWI/MESA+, TRACK?)

Prof.dr.ir. A. van den Berg

The BIOS-chair (“Miniaturised systems for biomedical and environmental applications”) aims at the research and development of Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) systems. In our vision, in the future there will be an increasing convergence of micro- and nanotechnologies with physics, chemistry and life sciences to improve the quality of life. Therefore, the group sees it as their mission to:

o

expand the knowledge and understanding of nanofluidics,

o

bridge the gap between users from physical, chemical, biomedical and life-sciences fields,

o

develop new micro- and nanotechnologies and

o

demonstrate the potential of LOC applications.

The core competence is found in micro/nanofluidics, micro/nanofabrication, and electrical measurement techniques. The BIOS group has strategic collaborations within EWI with the group TST, and within TNW with the groups AMK, SMCT, PCF and PF groups.

Site: http://bios.ewi.utwente.nl

Contact: Prof.dr.ir. A. van den Berg

8.11.8

ENGINEERING FLUIDS DYNAMICS (CTW, HFT)

Prof.dr.ir. H.W.M. Hoeijmakers

Research of the Group Engineering Fluid Dynamics deals with theoretical, numerical and experimental studies. One of the four themes concerns:

Biophysical flows

Biofluid dynamics is mainly concentrated on flows in the human body and, more specific, flows in the human lungs. This research deals, in particular, with the flow-induced deformation of the elastic tubes. Research is aimed at developing new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. At the subsection of biophysical fluid dynamics the following projects are under investigation:

o

Flows through elastic (lung) tubes

o

Development of a device to measure continuously and non-invasively the workings of breathing

o

Deposition of aerosols in the human lung

Site: http://www.ts.ctw.utwente.nl

Contact: Dr.ir. F.H.C. de Jongh

8.11.9

HEALTH CARE TECHNOLOGY (EWI, HFT)

prof.dr.ir. H.J. HermensProf.dr.ir. H.J. Hermens

Organisatorically, this group is embedded in the research group of Biomedical Signals and Systems of Prof.dr.ir. P.H. Veltink.

Health Care Technology addresses research and teaching in the area of technology for care of clients with chronic and irreversible disorders, especially in neurological and neuromuscular disorders. The area focuses on innovative technologies and processes that improve the quality of life of clients and their caregivers, as well as on the quality of work of health care professionals. The emphasis is on the patient’s problems that result from impairments of the neural system. Technologies considered are: information- and communication technologies, assistive and adaptive technologies, domotics, tele-health and home care technologies. Research projects are conducted in close cooperation with local and regional health care, industry, and public authorities.

Site: -

Contact: Prof.dr.ir. H.J. Hermens

8.11.10

LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS - BIOMAGNETISM (TNW, MCTE & HFT)

Picture of Ten HakenDr.ir. B. ten Haken

The Biomag group in the LT-division is studying magnetic interactions with human beings and bio-materials. The magnetic fields that are presently used in medicine range from ~1.5 Tesla, in a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system, down to ~1 femto-Tesla (1 fT = 10‑15 T), which is a typical detection limit in a Magneto-EncephaloGram (MEG) system measuring the activity of a human brain.

The broad magnetic field-range applied medicine explains why the Biomag group is part of the Low Temperature division. To generate a magnetic field sufficiently strong for MRI and to measure a magnetic signal sufficiently sensitive for MEG, superconducting systems are required. Superconducting devices can only be operated at temperatures far below room temperature. At present almost all MRI and MEG systems placed in hospitals are operated at a temperature near 4 Kelvin (= -269 ºC).

The Biomag group can host students from the following various courses on the scale from physics to medicine. Active collaborations exist with various hospitals and research institutes in the Netherlands and abroad.

Current research projects concern:

·

Development of new magnetic measurement methods

·

Application of magnetically active nano-materials in medicine

·

Magnetic measurements on stem cell cultures (cardiomycytes)

·

Magneto-cardiogram of the Foetal Heart

·

New techniques in Neuro-imaging (collaboration with FC-Donders/Radboud)

·

Magnetic methods for Brain Computer Interfaces

·

Development of new detection systems for MRI

Site: http://lt.tnw.utwente.nl/research/bio

Contact: Dr. ir. B. ten Haken

8.11.11

MEMBRANE TECHNOLOGY (TNW, MCTE)

WesslingProf.dr.-ing. M. Wessling

The Membrane Technology Group works in the field membrane technology and applications. The strategy of the group is the application of multiple disciplines to challenging fields of separation processes and mass transport control. Currently, the group hosts about 15 PhD students, 2 postdocs, 7 technicians, and 5 staff members. A wide range of instruments for membrane preparation, characterization and testing is available. The group is collaborating with several industrial companies and is participating in a variety of national and international research programs. Besides, the group is part of a Network of Excellence, entitled “Expanding membrane macroscale applications by exploring nanoscale material properties”. In BME, the group performs research in the following projects:

Advanced polymeric structures for tissue engineering

A new micro-fabrication technique called: Phase Separation Micro Molding (PSmM) is used to a broad range of materials (polymers ceramics etc) to create scaffolds for tissue engineering. The effect of scaffold patterning to the tissue formation is evaluated using different cell types.

Bio-mimetic capillary networks for tissue engineering

This project aims at engineering scaffolds for tissue engineering wherein nutrients and oxygen would be supplied homogeneously. Polymeric scaffolds are designed through novel methods involving free form fabrication and fibre spinning.

Effect of local micro-environment to the tissue formation

Commitment of stem cells to different lineages is regulated by many cues in the local tissue micro-environment. In this project, the effect of micro-structure on the cell behaviour and tissue formation is investigated. The micro-structures are prepared by phase separation micro-molding using various materials. Micro-fluidics technology is used for the modification of the structures

In this project, a mixed matrix membrane is developed in which affinity particles are entrapped. The result is a porous matrix in which the particles are positioned, fixed in space. Because of the membrane porosity the particles are easy accessible for target molecules such as proteins, peptides, hormones etc.

Mixed Matrix Membranes for Enzyme Immobilization

Enzymes are immobilized in mixed matrix membranes (either bound to particles by a ligand or by interactions between the particle and the enzyme). Main efforts are focused on material selection and ligand binding. Ideally, the particles must be highly porous and small to create a high active surface for enzyme loading.

Massive parallelization of CEC for bio-separations

The project aims to fabricate nano-porous polymer fibres as stationary phases in capillary electro-chromatography (CEC). A new capillary-based module allowing the massive scale-up of analytical CEC towards preparative chromatography is developed for various bio-separations.

Site: http://mtg.tnw.utwente.nl

Contact: Dr. D. Stamatialis

8.11.12

MOLECULAR CELL BIOLOGY (TNW, MCTE)

Wiebe KruijerProf.dr. W. Kruijer

Research of the Molecular Cell Biology group is focused on stem cells and their application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Proliferation and differentiation of stem cells is studied in response to growth factor action as well as in relation to interaction with functionalised extra cellular matrix substrates. Cellular responses to these factors are investigated at the level of activation of intracellular signalling pathways and gene transcription in the nucleus. The research is performed using a wide variety of cell biological, molecular, biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, including gene transfer into stem cells, analysis of gene expression by high density micro-arrays, confocal microscopy and image analysis and bioinformatics.

Current research projects concern:

o

Genome-wide characterisation of DNA binding sites of transcription factors involved in regulation of stem cell pluripotency;

o

Chromatin assembly and dynamics in relation to transcription of stem cell specific gene expression;

o

Stem cell behaviour in response to different cell-matrix interactions;

o

Generation of ES-equivalent cells from somatic cells.

Site: http://pbm.tnw.utwente.nl (organisatorically embedded in PBM group)

Contact: Prof.dr. W. Kruijer and/or Dr. J.N. Post

8.11.13

PHYSICS OF FLUIDS (TNW, HFT)

Detlef LohseProf.dr. D. Lohse

The Physics of Fluids group works on a variety of aspects in fluid mechanics, in particular on those related to bubbles. The focus of their work is the fundamental understanding of the phenomena of the physics of fluids, bubbles and jets, which is undertaken by experimental, numerical and theoretical means. One of the four themes is:

Biomedical flow

Bubbles have various applications in the biomedical field. Coated micro bubbles are used in ultrasound imaging to enhance the contrast in cardiac or liver perfusion images. Bubbles can be targeted to specific cells for molecular imaging to non-invasively detect the presence and location of diseases such as cancer or atherosclerosis. Furthermore, the bubbles can be exploited to generate acoustic streaming and jetting near cell boundaries which leads to permeation, destruction or removal of target cells. Research subjects are:

o

Ultrasound Contrast Agents

o

Lithotripsy and Gene Transfer

o

Non-invasive Molecular Tumour Imaging and Killing (NIMTIK)

o

Cells under Jetting Flow Conditions

o

BURST: Bubbles for Ultrasound and Therapy

o

TAMIRUT: Targeted Micro-bubbles and Remote Ultrasound Transduction

o

ENDO: Ultrasonic cleaning of root canals

Site: http://pof.tnw.utwente.nl

Contact: Dr. Michel Versluis

8.11.14

POLYMER CHEMISTRY AND BIOMATERIALS (TNW, MCTE)

Jan FeijenProf.dr. J. Feijen

The PBM group is involved in the following research programs:

o

Design and synthesis of novel biodegradable polymers

o

Polymer systems for drug delivery

o

Tissue engineering

o

Gene delivery

Biodegradable polymers based on different synthetic monomers have been prepared by ring-opening polymerization. These include poly(esters), poly(carbonates) and poly(depsipeptides). The drug-delivery systems are based on hydrogels, nano-particles, nano-spheres and polymersomes. Tissue engineering is directed to the engineering of blood vessels, cartilage and bone. Novel systems for gene delivery based on synthetic polymers are being designed.

Site: http://pbm.tnw.utwente.nl

Contact: Prof. Dr. J. Feijen or Dr. P. Dijkstra

8.11.15

SIGNALS & SYSTEMS (EWI, HFT)

Kees SlumpProf.dr.ir. C.H. Slump

The Systems & signals group focuses at the research theme Non-invasive diagnostics and contributes to several research topics

Non-invasive diagnostics

o

The project Iso-surface volume-rendering aims at fast and high-quality real-time 3D visualization of human objects as revealed by 3D CT and MRI data.

o

The Reuma project aims at an automated measurement of joint-space widths in hand radiographs as objective measure of the damage due to rheumatoid arthritis.

o

In the project ‘Non Invasive Molecular Tumour Imaging and Killing’ (NIMTIK) a combined effort is made to design non- or minimally invasive screening methods to specifically identify and eradicate early tumours.

Site: http://www.sas.el.utwente.nl

Contact: Prof.dr.ir. C.H. Slump