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MESA+ News

21 Oct 2014 - BP invests 2 million in fundamental research UT In the next five years, BP will invest two million euros in fundamental research by the department of Physics of Complex Fluids of  the UT research institute MESA+. The purpose of the research is to obtain a better understanding of how oil is attached to the porous bedrock of an oil field at the molecular level. Application of this knowledge ought to make it possible to extract increased quantities of oil from existing fields.  17 Oct 2014 - Kleinste handkrachtsensor ter wereld in aantocht Het is de kleinste handkrachtsensor in zijn soort ter wereld en de sensor is nuttig voor het meten van de motoriek bij patiënten die moeten revalideren, of hoe de daadwerkelijke belasting is bij het verrichten van fysieke arbeid en zelfs om te meten hoe een sporter, bijvoorbeeld een speerwerper of een kogelstoter zijn techniek kan verbeteren. Het prototype is gereed en UT- promovendus Robert Brookhuis is in gesprek met de industrie om het product daadwerkelijk op de markt te krijgen. Hij promoveert op 17 oktober.  15 Oct 2014 - Tide Microfluidics grote winnaar COMS 2014 Tide Microfluidics, spin-off van het MESA+ instituut voor nanotechnologie van de Universiteit Twente, is tijdens COMS 2014 in Salt Lake City (VS) in de prijzen gevallen. Het jonge, innovatieve bedrijfje won tijdens de grote, internationale conferentie over commercialisatie van nanotechnologie zowel de publieksprijs als de Young Technology Award van 5.000 dollar. 15 Oct 2014 - FOM Valorization Award for Dave Blank and Guus Rijnders The prestigious “Valorization Award 2014” of the Dutch FOM Foundation will be awarded to top scientists Prof Dave Blank and Prof Guus Rijnders of UT’s MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology. “They successfully build bridges between various scientific disciplines, between science and business and between science and society”, according to the jury. The award, involving 250,000 euros, will be handed out during the annual Physics@FOM conference in Veldhoven, January 2015. 9 Oct 2014 - Please vote for UT scientists in VIVA400 Every year, the glossy VIVA, a weekly magazine for women, composes a list of the 400 most inspiring and successful women under 45 of The Netherlands. 7 scientists from the UT are nominated for the 2014 edition. The UT nominees are: Angele Reinders, Anne Leferink, Heidi Witteveen, Kitty Nijmeijer, Marieke Martens, Renske van Wijk en Sophie van Baalen. Now the game has begun and people can vote for their favourite.  The person with the highest number of votes will be awarded the VIVA 400 award 2014. It would be great if someone from the MESA+ will receive that award. 29 Sep 2014 - Creating nanostructures using simple stamps Nanostructures of virtually any possible shape can now be made using a combination of techniques developed by the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology of the University of Twente. Especially the unique properties of so-called perovskites can be exploited further: their crystal structure is not influenced by the process. The UT scientists present their findings in the journal Advanced Functional Materials. 25 Sep 2014 - Poster Award winners at MESA+ Annual Meeting 2014 On Monday September 22nd, the annual meeting of MESA+ institute for Nanotechnology was held in Cinestar Enschede. This symposium gives an overview of activities within MESA+, among which their collaboration in various fundamental and applied research projects and programs. Over the past year, MESA+ published over 450 scientific publications, 60 PhDs graduated, and over 15.000 MESA+ articles have been cited. The annual meeting also hosts the David Reinhoudt Poster Award. 24 Sep 2014 - A prison for photons in a diamond-like photonic crystal Scientists from the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology at the University of Twente in the Netherlands have designed a novel type of reso­nant cavity that serves as a prison for photons. The cavity confines light in all three dimensions in space inside a photonic crystal. The crystals have a struc­ture similar to how atoms are arranged in diamond gems. Confining photons has many applications in optics (efficient miniature lasers and LEDs), communication technology (on-chip storage bits of information), and even in life sciences (tiny, yet sensitive sensors of phar­maceutical materials). The results appear in the leading journal Physical Review B that is published by the American Physical Society (APS).